This bird was in the yard today (pic)
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HOLMES
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« on: March 13, 2007, 01:26:08 PM »

Kind of looked out of place.


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* MVC-007S.JPG (29.44 kB, 640x480 - viewed 945 times.)

* MVC-006S.JPG (40.21 kB, 640x480 - viewed 945 times.)
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The devil made me do it the first time, but the second time I did it on my own.............
SteveP
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« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2007, 05:09:10 PM »

Piebald Grackle?
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endeavor
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« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2007, 05:10:27 PM »

That's my guess!
Piebald Grackle?
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HOLMES
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« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2007, 07:55:48 PM »

I wanted to shoot it but I was pretty sure it was not leagle.
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The devil made me do it the first time, but the second time I did it on my own.............
BeckyBird
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2007, 09:39:34 PM »

It always feels like spring when the grackles return!
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taxos
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« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2007, 05:42:13 AM »

a partial albino grackle
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Peter Span
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« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2007, 08:23:53 AM »

Its a leucistic bird, albinos have no pigment at all. Cool bird!
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Just_A_Beginner
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« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2007, 10:50:47 AM »

It's only a partial leucistic/pied. A complete leucistic would have been cool though.

There used to be a wild albino magpie near the castle's wood, it was white and pale caramel in colour. We also used to have a pied greenfinch which visited our garden but I haven't seen that one in months. They don't tend to last long though... :(
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[email protected] Life
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« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2007, 06:45:46 PM »

Looks like a Clark's Nutcracker
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[email protected] Life
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« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2007, 06:48:01 PM »

Sorry, take that back...no a nutcracker.....didn't look close enough at the tail colour......
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SteveP
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« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2007, 08:24:13 PM »

a partial albino grackle

That's what we call "piebald" over here.
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Pelc Wildlife Arts
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« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2007, 09:14:58 PM »

Albinism may be expressed as complete or incomplete (phenotypically), shown in varying degrees of pigmentation of skin, hair or eyes, feathers, etc..  The majority of men and women with genetic (genotypic, which is complete) albinism may have pink eyes, but most common are pale blue eyes, with some even having brown.

When I was in college (many years ago), tyrosinosis was a name given to a condition of tyrosine albinism.  The pigment level of melanin was normal, but the absence or reduced levels of the amino acid tyrosine, limited the permeability of the cell membrane for pigment to be placed.  Hence, a lighter or white physical appearance.

In essence, you could think of this as a placement factor, similar to a person being genetically brown eyed, but the placement gene for brown eyes is limited (resulting in ranges of green or hazel eyes) or absent (resulting in blue).

Albinism is not well understood. And because of such a limited understanding, a wide range of lighter colored conditions outside of what is expected as normal, may be called albino, or albinistic.   I am not so sure if I would place what is called piebald, or distinct pattern markings (i.e. the Holstein cow pattern) into this category.

As I am quite curious about this bird, I am asking my daughter to post a link to this page on a birding message board she is a member of; to see if further information can come to light regarding it.

Michael
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Pelc Wildlife Arts
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« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2007, 11:08:05 PM »

As mentioned, my daughter posted on a bird board, and received two responses . . . their last names have been removed.  Their posts are maroon in color.

Also, I am including Wikipedia information regarding leucism . . . it is quite interesting.  At the bottom of the information is a photo of, though different in pattern than Holmes bird, a leucistic common grackle.

Hope this information is helpful to you,

Michael
   

The rest of the birds in the picture are Common Grackles the bird in question is also a Common Grackle only it is a partial albino. This is a genetic defect but seen regularly in birds of all kind it is very similar to regular albinism where the animal is all white with pink eyes (technically the are not white they just lack pigment). In the case of this bird, for whatever reason it lacks pigment on parts of its body but retains it on other parts. Partial albinos are more common than "pure" albinos as albinism of any form is a recessive trait and the white color makes the animals stand out to predators.
 
Brady


I'm guessing it is a leucistic Brewer's Blackbird or grackle.

Bob


Leucism
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Leucistic)
Leucism is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals.
Leucism is a general term for the phenotype resulting from defects in pigment cell differentiation and/or migration from the neural crest to skin, hair or feathers during development. This results in either the entire surface (if all pigment cells fail to develop) or patches of body surface (if only a subset are defective) having a lack of cells capable of making pigment.
Since all pigment cell-types differentiate from the same multipotent precursor cell-type, leucism can cause the reduction in all types of pigment. This is in contrast to albinism, for which leucism is often mistaken. Albinism results in the reduction of melanin production only, though the melanocyte (or melanophore) is still present. Thus in species that have other pigment cell-types, for example xanthophores, albinos will not be entirely white instead displaying a pale yellow colour.
More common than a complete absence of pigment cells is localized or incomplete hypopigmentation, resulting in irregular patches of white on an animal that otherwise has normal colouring and patterning. This partial leucism is known as a "pied" or "piebald" effect; and the ratio of white to normal-coloured skin can vary considerably not only between generations, but between different offspring from the same parents, and even between members of the same litter. This is notable in horses, the urban crow[1] and the ball python[2] but is also found in many other species. In contrast, albinism always affects the entire animal.
A further difference between albinism and leucism is in eye colour. Due to the lack of melanin production in both the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and iris, albinos typically have red eyes due to the underlying blood vessels showing through. In contrast, leucistic animals have normally coloured eyes. This is because the melanocytes of the RPE are not derived from the neural crest, instead an outpouching of the neural tube generates the optic cup which, in turn, forms the retina. As these cells are from an independent developmental origin, they are typically unaffected by the genetic cause of leucism.
Genes that, when mutated, can cause leucism include, c-kit [3], mitf [4] and ednrb [5]
Term origin and pronunciation
The terms leucistic and leucism are derived from medical terminology. The prefix leuc- is the Latin variant of leuk- from the Greek leukos meaning "white" (see Steadmans, Dorlands or Tabers medical dictionaries). The correct pronunciation of leucistic is (loo-kiss-tic) and leucism is (loo-kism) since the prefix in Greek and Latin are pronounced with the hard C or K sound. Since the prefix leuc- is a variant of leuk-, in medical circles the terms may also be spelled with a k (leukistic and leukism).


* Common Grackle Leucistic-From Wikipedia.jpg (99.95 kB, 671x569 - viewed 517 times.)
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