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Taxidermy.Net Forum  |  Beginners, Training & Tutorials  |  Beginners  |  Topic: corn cob grit « previous next »
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Author Topic: corn cob grit  (Read 724 times)
Venuswolf
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Posts: 33

« on: October 22, 2012, 01:42:00 AM »

I want to try using the dryer as a tumbler (would putting everything into either a canvas knapsack or tied off pillowcase work?) and I was wondering what size grit to use. I was looking at a sitewhich made me realize that the grit isn't a one-size-fits-all product. Some for blasting, some for smoking, part drying and polishing, animal bedding, and many more. I already know that the heat on the dryer should be turned off. As a side question, what would the recommended setting be (delicate, etc.). Thanks ahead of time. I appreciate it.

PS. will be tumbling rabbit furs.
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Low T
Platinum Member
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Location: my house
Posts: 21361


« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2012, 06:09:13 AM »

Are you talking one or two rabbits, or hundreds? For a couple of Rabbits, you do not need to buy cob grit or saw dust, just blow dry them with a shop vac. Why do you want to tumble them anyway?
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And no, I do not own a Tshirt that has a wolf or unicorn on it.
There is no such thing as gun control, only people control.
Stop Rot,,use it or lose it.
Rest well our friend, you are missed.
kirk33
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Location: North Eastern lower penninsula
Posts: 642


lighten up buddy

« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2012, 12:04:16 PM »

Seal off the holes inside the dryer with sheet metal. If you are trying to use the same dryer you use for your clothes just use a bucket with a lid and roll it around with the grit inside.
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Providing wholesale fleshing/tanning services, as well as fish mounting for the taxidermy industry.
Venuswolf
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Posts: 33

« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2012, 09:08:22 PM »

@Low T- it will eventually add up to hundreds (not nearly at the same time though, probably around 4-8 hides each, ad around 6-8 months apart), but I am saving up pickled hides. As for why I need a tumbler, I need to get the hides soft. I was told that a tumbler is easier than doing it all manually, although I think I would try manually first (just in case), before the hide dries too much. I was told to use airplane wire to break the hide, but I don't have any. I tanned a squirrel and stretched and softened by hand, but it didn't come out too well. I'm trying to make a blanket from the hides, and eventually do full body mounts. If you have any ideas or insites, please let me know. I'm eager to learn.

@Kirk33- thank you very much. I guess I'd better do it in a bucket :p

Should I use grit or sand? I just read that some people use sand, but I don't trust the source (ehow) since I doubt they have experiece. I know that sandpaper can be used to soften, but I ended up putting a hole in the squirrel (I'd forgotten about the sandpaper). Thanks guys.
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Low T
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Location: my house
Posts: 21361


« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2012, 09:47:48 PM »

Then a clothes dryer is not the tumbler you need to soften hides. There isn't a tannery in the world that uses a clothes dryer. A clothes dryer runs to fast, all it will do to those little furs is spin them. You want a big 6, 8, or 10 foot tumbler with 100 pounds of sawdust, or you are wasting your time with a clothes dryer. You need height so the skins fall and get pounded soft by the heavy sawdust. A dryer will never do. A clothes dryer with cob or sawdust will dry a skin, but not break it soft.
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And no, I do not own a Tshirt that has a wolf or unicorn on it.
There is no such thing as gun control, only people control.
Stop Rot,,use it or lose it.
Rest well our friend, you are missed.
Venuswolf
New Member
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Posts: 33

« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2012, 12:36:47 AM »

Thanks. Do you know of any other way to do it? Like I mentioned, I tried doing a squirrel with sandpaper and breaking by hand (hide is thinner though, so I guess I shouldn't compare them). I was thinking about airplane wire but know nothing about it, and can't afford to send so many furs to a tannery.
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Dangitboy
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Location: Texas
Posts: 362


« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2012, 07:31:56 AM »

If you do try the dryer idea, be sure a totally disconnect the heater element. Your going to start yourself a fire if you don't.
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Low T
Platinum Member
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Location: my house
Posts: 21361


« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2012, 07:51:01 AM »

Thanks. Do you know of any other way to do it? Like I mentioned, I tried doing a squirrel with sandpaper and breaking by hand (hide is thinner though, so I guess I shouldn't compare them). I was thinking about airplane wire but know nothing about it, and can't afford to send so many furs to a tannery.

I guess you could get a job at McDonald's and save up some money to send the furs out for the best results. Or do it by hand, one bad squirrel should not stop you from working harder.
Logged

And no, I do not own a Tshirt that has a wolf or unicorn on it.
There is no such thing as gun control, only people control.
Stop Rot,,use it or lose it.
Rest well our friend, you are missed.
Venuswolf
New Member
*
Posts: 33

« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2012, 12:24:54 AM »

I was just wondering if there was a better way than what I did with the squirrel. Of course, it wouldn't be good for the first several tries, but needed advice. Guess I'll keep trying by hand in different ways. Will probably still try the bucket though after breaking most of it by hand.

Yeah, I read about the heat element, that's why I mentioned disconnecting it.

Thanks guys.
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kirk33
Gold Member
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Location: North Eastern lower penninsula
Posts: 642


lighten up buddy

« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2012, 10:25:30 AM »

Yes there is a much better way! You must learn to properly tan the hides you are working with and then you can just stake them and or sand them. Good luck it is a long process learning how to tan, I have been at it for 15 years and still learning. Even if you had a large tumbler it is not a magic tool that will fix all the things that were done wrong durring the tanning process.
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Providing wholesale fleshing/tanning services, as well as fish mounting for the taxidermy industry.
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