New Ideas on Using Epply's Tru Eyes
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Taxidermy.Net Forum  |  Beginners, Training & Tutorials  |  Tutorials  |  Topic: New Ideas on Using Epply's Tru Eyes « previous next »
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boone
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« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2007, 01:09:58 AM »

Hi Ken, Ive used True-Eyes exclusively for years and havent had any problems that I can think of. I agree with you on the shape and coloration...hard to beat! I use a metal dental pic to do my initial tucking, then follow up with a wooden tool ( I use a cuticle stick(??)...your wife can get them from the nail salon and you can thin and shape them with a scalpel) to drive the skin in. I then use a stiff artist brush to detail and soften things up. As for cleaning...nothing special, remove over spray with a wooden tooth pick. Clean with alcohol and Q-tip or artist brush. Shine with windex. Take Care
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Big John
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« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2007, 06:54:55 AM »

I have found out when using the Eppley's Tru-eyes you really have to treat it like it's a whole different eye process.  I have found out through trial and error that you can use them successfully if you treat it gently; like taking care of a new baby.  Ha.

They are undoubtly the Best eye on the market at this time in my Opinion.  They don't have that Cold look like glass.  When you put that light on them that pupil is very distinct and the color of the Iris is just about perfect in my Opinion.  So, my suggestion is use them and always be aware to treat them gently.  I am now even using metal sculpting tools to work around them.  It takes practice but once you get that confidence you can use then easily.  Yes, when I first began using them I got sorta discouraged because I have scratched my share of them also.  It all boils down to how to handle them and I suggest once you use them gently you shouldn't have a problem. 

John Griffith
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KBauman
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« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2007, 07:52:21 AM »

These are all excellent ideas.  I do 95% of them currently.  I have been using them for about 3 years now.  It still doesn't matter how careful I treat them, BAM an scuff.  I think my shop must be too dirty and the fan is blowing debris over them (HA HA).  They are definately a different ball park.
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Glen Conley
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« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2007, 02:48:28 PM »

Note from home.

The above adults now have written permission to make their own tools.

I abuse the Hell out of the Tru Eyes.  I checked three sets last night that have been used repeatedly, dropped, placed in modeling clay, dug out again, reset, eye lid edges trimmed of excess oil base or wax clay with metal tools......got my drift?  Out of those, I found one eye that had a slight mar that could be seen if the light was just right.

I do use brass modeling tools, and it does seem to make a difference.

Catch is, you have to roll yer own.  1/8" soft brass brazing rod is all you need, get it from any welder of metal supply.  They'll either give it to you, or charge a token amount.

Use the anvil on a vise to draw the metal out with a ballpeen hammer, trim off excess with diagonals or lineman's pliers.  File to shape.  Use a progression of sanding papers to get rid of file marks.  Final polishing is done with wet or dry, followed by a buffing with crocus cloth, and then the backside of a leather belt.

Make a tool to fit anything you need.

Pictured is some of the end variations I use that are the most versatile.  The one in the center works real good for tucking eye skin.  I use 'em for about any medium, body filler, earth clay, two part epoxy, whatever, just keep them clean as you go.  They last for years.  Heath, you may have seen a set I made for Cary back when you guys were working together.  The ones pictured were made back before then.
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Heath Cline
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« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2007, 06:37:01 PM »

Glen ,
Yes I do remember those tools and I remember them working great. But to put them in Cary's hands is not a very good test, I think he could use two pieces of firewood for modeling tools and still produce an excellent mount !!!  HAHAHA
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« Reply #20 on: June 06, 2007, 12:51:46 AM »

Kenneth, I think you are cleaning them TOO much. Less wiping = less chance to scratch. Heath knows how many years I have been using those eyes, and I can count on one hand the number of scratches. I use a T pin and/or a pointed thin modeling tool to set the lids, then an artists brush to adjust, along with a wet rag. After lacquer paint I clean with alcohol, wipe with Static Guard and polish it. Brad told me of Future Floor wax for scratches, I have an eye I purposely scratched and treated with Future sitting on my window sill from almost 3 years ago, still is ok.
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Terry Vining
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« Reply #21 on: June 06, 2007, 12:28:52 PM »

I don't think I've ever scratched one. I do like the fact that "when" I drop one, I can pick it up and not sweep it up like the glass eyes.
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KBauman
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« Reply #22 on: June 07, 2007, 08:10:27 AM »

Who the heck knows.  All these success stories with these fragile eyes.  Like I said, I must have two left thumbs when it comes to these eyes.  I like the Q-tip thoughts above and I think I might of figured it out.  As a few of you know, my first love was fish.  I do quite a few fiberglass fish mounts for people.  I am beginning to think my Q-tips are contaminated with the fiberglass dust from doing replica fish.  I am getting a clean sealed jar to keep my Q-tips in.  Hopefully, this will help.  Thanks for all the info.
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Randy Miller
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« Reply #23 on: October 25, 2008, 03:24:23 PM »

I use the Trueyes almost exclusively for commercial whitetail and of course they will scratch. The last thing I do after all the finish work is done is lob on some Don Holt Wet for the Wild. Sctatches no longer exist.
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Brian Claar
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« Reply #24 on: October 29, 2008, 09:15:58 AM »

Hey Ken, just so you don't feel bad.  Last season I tried a pair and everything was great.   I was finishing 5 deer at the same time and forgot all about those eyes.  You see sometimes I'll scrape paint off with a scalple blade ,  :o , OUCH!    What a mess.  I will be trying some more of them this coming season, and I will be careful this time.
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« Reply #25 on: October 29, 2008, 03:48:39 PM »

They also make great keys when building a mold! ;)
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