Dorsal skinning a lifesize Bobcat & Beaver (Beaver pics added)
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Taxidermy.Net Forum  |  Beginners, Training & Tutorials  |  Tutorials  |  Topic: Dorsal skinning a lifesize Bobcat & Beaver (Beaver pics added) « previous next »
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Author Topic: Dorsal skinning a lifesize Bobcat & Beaver (Beaver pics added)  (Read 50796 times)
michael p.
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« on: December 28, 2007, 01:10:46 AM »

There was a young man the day before yesterday that asked for a tutorial on dorsal skinning. This is just the way I do it, some others may have better way's and/or advice so please add your 2 cents if you do. I will post the Bobcat today & then add the Beaver & Fox in a few day's. Hope this helps some beginners understand dorsal cut skinning for lifesize mammals.


BTW, I usually do not dorsal skin cats (most fox & all beavers I do though) I split the belly & leg's for I have found it a lot easier to modify or alter my form, totally prep it & then apply & Taxi the hide. But for this particular mount I am using a dorsal incision because it will work better for the form & mount I am doing for the customer.




Start by splitting the cat down the back from the bottom part of the neck to a couple of inches above the base of the tail.





start skinning around every reachable area & then snip the tail off at the base.





I prefer to spray the skin with Stop-Rot while skinning
 

Keep skinning around & make a 1 1/2" - 2" cut right above the pads in the feet (this allows easier skinning & easy insertion & modeling of clay when mounting) DO NOT CUT THE PADS!






Now to the feet, I prefer to remove the toes while skinning, not later during fleshing. Get as much done now while you can!

Start by skinning down as far as you can & then snipping the toes off.




Then split the toe & foot bone for easy removal


Skin on down & remove the toe bone & the very bottom joint, you can snip right in between the cartilage with ease.


After all the toes have been removed, move up to the head & skin. On the ears, skin & split them as far as you can while attached to the head....this gives you weight leverage of the cat to help you skin, and then later you will not have as much prep & splitting work to do. The less you have to touch the ears with your warm hands, the less chance you have of the ear hair slipping After splitting as far as possible, the remove the ear from the head as close to the base as possible. After that, finish skinning the skin away from the head until completely removed.


Cut off at base


This is what your finished skin & body should look like.





« Last Edit: December 29, 2007, 01:36:55 AM by michael p. » Logged

Spent my whole life lookin' back
 Not lookin' ahead to see
 Trying to keep my feet on track
 Doin' what was expected of me
 Kick my shoes off so they can't trace me
 Leave no forwarding address
 Before they all drive me crazy
 And I leave 'em all in a bloody mess
C.C.
crankin
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« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2007, 01:36:25 AM »

hey why do you snip the tail? i have a tail stripper i zip the bone right out with it on the carcass, 2 seconds and done... just wondering if you have a method to your madness...lol
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COLLIN
michael p.
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« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2007, 01:41:37 AM »

hey why do you snip the tail? i have a tail stripper i zip the bone right out with it on the carcass, 2 seconds and done... just wondering if you have a method to your madness...lol

Just the way i've always done it. I've never tried one of those tail zip's, but a few tears ago I was stripping the tail out while still attached to the body & I guess I applied the wrong pressure some where & the thing shot sh*t all over me! I think i'll still do it the stone age way :)
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Spent my whole life lookin' back
 Not lookin' ahead to see
 Trying to keep my feet on track
 Doin' what was expected of me
 Kick my shoes off so they can't trace me
 Leave no forwarding address
 Before they all drive me crazy
 And I leave 'em all in a bloody mess
C.C.
crankin
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« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2007, 01:56:26 AM »

get your self one man, it makes life easier, especially with the yotes!
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COLLIN
visions of wildlife taxid
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« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2007, 02:07:39 AM »

yep i do everything just about like you do michael, with the exception of what colin said, i have a tail zipper to, and it is a great tool especially for them long tailed critters, as far as it shootin crap all over ya, it wouldnt be the first time, and probably wont be the last, just dont stand there with your mouth open, or you wont want dinner that night  ;D.  I actually have never had one do what you described, LOL
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crankin
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« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2007, 02:15:47 AM »

LOL, i cant say that i have had one do that either, what you doin to that critter to make it do that??? lol, i think it is the best 3.00 you can spend, give it another try Michael...i also dont snip the toes, for me its easier to use the body for weight, but i get the rearend skinned then hang them from a gramble, just so im not bending over all the time.
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COLLIN
visions of wildlife taxid
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« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2007, 02:22:16 AM »

im not bent over either colin, its called a stainless steel topped skinning table and chair, LOL i am sittin on my softspot while i skin, LOL
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Visions of Wildlife Taxidermy Studio
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102 Laray St. Cassville,MO 65625


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Bobbi Meyer
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« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2007, 10:23:19 AM »

stuff their chutes with a paper towel...no more flying caca !
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Darrell
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« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2007, 10:28:04 AM »

stuff their chutes with a paper towel...no more flying caca !

ROTFLMAO

Good deal Michael, I like it when folks do these pictorials.  I am going to be altering some fawn forms in a bit I may do one on that.
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taxiyank
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« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2007, 04:13:34 PM »

Thanks Michael P.  It's always a great thing to watch the methods of someone with more experience.  I can't wait to see the rest of them.
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Hopefully not too old to learn something new!
Amy
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« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2007, 04:22:56 PM »

Great tutorial Michael! This would be a great help to beginners. The only thing I do differently is I don't make relief cuts in the feet. With a little practice, cat feet are pretty easy to invert (unlike canines). When I go to mount, rather the coat the legs of the form with hidepaste and risk getting it on the fur (always annoying), I simply take a big dollop of paste and push it down in leg itself .. squish it around till it gets all the way down in the foot. Makes things less messy. And just less darned sewing to have to deal with.
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JEJ
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« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2007, 04:44:16 PM »

MP, thanks for this tutorial.  looking forward to more.  I have only done game heads and planned on trying some small mammals this winter.  Am going to get some videos but this also helps greatly.  Appreciate it!
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michael p.
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« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2007, 05:18:35 PM »

Great tutorial Michael! This would be a great help to beginners. The only thing I do differently is I don't make relief cuts in the feet. With a little practice, cat feet are pretty easy to invert (unlike canines

I've tried it that way Amy, but I like to be able to shove my finger up there (Gosh that sounds terrible ::) :P ) and work the clay....kinda shape my foot before I slide the leg's on. That's what'sw cool about this though, different strokes work for different folk's & if you're a beginner I suggest you try both ways. I know a guy n Kerrville who think's any relief cut is for sissies!! LOL
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Spent my whole life lookin' back
 Not lookin' ahead to see
 Trying to keep my feet on track
 Doin' what was expected of me
 Kick my shoes off so they can't trace me
 Leave no forwarding address
 Before they all drive me crazy
 And I leave 'em all in a bloody mess
C.C.
Heavybarrel270
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« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2007, 05:20:11 PM »

Absolutely Incredible that the more experienced on here take the time to share all this info for us beginners to learn . Thank you Michael P!!!
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Mason(Ron&Linda)
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« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2007, 05:41:35 PM »

Thanks for your time you spent on that Michael!

         Mason
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Taxidermy.Net Forum  |  Beginners, Training & Tutorials  |  Tutorials  |  Topic: Dorsal skinning a lifesize Bobcat & Beaver (Beaver pics added) « previous next »
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