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Taxidermy.Net Forum  |  Taxidermy Discussion Categories  |  Skulls and Skeletons  |  Topic: Metallizing? « previous next »
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Author Topic: Metallizing?  (Read 3362 times)
bartman
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« on: October 14, 2010, 12:11:23 PM »

How is this done?  Is it the same as the water transfer stuff?

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George Roof
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2010, 01:13:11 PM »

No, that's a 3 part paint on system.  The skull is painted with a flat latex base. Then it's painted over with an oil based or lacquer based paint that's been saturated with metal flake powders to give you the bronze/copper/antique silver effect. In the past there was a company that sold this "system" for "antiquing" baby shoes, etc.  The company is out of business now I presume, however most hobby stores sell small kits that do this same job.  In the "OLD FORUMS" I wrote out a way of doing smaller projects using clear epoxy or very slow drying epoxy to give a more "glossy" finish.
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bartman
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2010, 01:17:57 PM »

With this process is there a need to degrease as much since the grease is essentially sealed inside the paint?
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Great Skulls?
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2010, 02:35:42 PM »

If anything I would guess that it would be more important to degrease.  You wouldn't want the paint to peel after some time when the grease comes back to the surface.
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George Roof
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« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2010, 04:48:24 PM »

If anything I would guess that it would be more important to degrease.  You wouldn't want the paint to peel after some time when the grease comes back to the surface.

X2
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rodlrock
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« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2010, 05:09:58 PM »

There are a few was to do this one is with A hot polyester resin or two part Polyurathane auto clear coat.
Sifft your bronze or other metal to 325 mesh.Add the siffed metal powder to your clear coat put in your spray gun and
spray  your part.Then let dry at 120 to 150  1 to two hr in a rush or let air dry over night,Lightly sand then buff with auto compound starting at the high grit then to to lower grit.
Then clean with gojo and water. 
After it drys clear coat it with gloss or mat  or you can let it age.
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Mold Maker since 1983,Ceramic plaster and polyurethane block,case,production molds, Glass molds,Silicone molds  for polyurethane foam  and polyester resin casting,,Wax molds.Fiberglass gelcoat molds for foam casting ,silicone spin casting molds and latex mold for plaster castings.Hobby photography
Ironclad
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« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2010, 09:25:55 PM »

The process I use is a commercial product not available for purchase without training from the manufacturer. Skull is cleaned, degreased and blasted with 180 grit AO media. I then mix ground metal (copper, bronze, nickel, etc) with a clear resin based binder and a catalyst. This is sprayed on with an hvlp gun and allowed to dry overnight. The wax reside left behind by the binder during curing is then removed via soda blasting exposing the metal. Piece can then be sanded, polished, buffed like a hot cast piece of metal. Different acids can be applied and the chemical reaction with the metal provides a natural aging or antiqued look. Last steps are highlighting and polishing as desired with buffing wheels and polishing compound or steel wool prior to an optional topcoat of wax or spray on clear sealer. The skulls I do are only part of my business.  I also use this process for copper countertops (over MDF plywood), bronze scupltures (over cast resin), signs (over high density foam) and many other applications. Not for your everyday guy to use, but the results in person are really unbelievable.

I do various trade and sportsman shows. Had a guy stop in the booth one day that owned a bronze foundry for 30+ years. He was baffled as to how I was getting such great detail in my molds on a deer skull he was looking at. When I told him that was the real deer skull under the metal he was blown away. Said it was undetectable from a hot cast bronze piece.




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George Roof
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« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2010, 09:31:23 PM »

Ironclad, that's some beautiful work you have there.
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Ironclad
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« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2010, 09:36:10 PM »

Thanks George. Appreciate it.
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rodlrock
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« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2010, 10:46:44 PM »

very nice
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Mold Maker since 1983,Ceramic plaster and polyurethane block,case,production molds, Glass molds,Silicone molds  for polyurethane foam  and polyester resin casting,,Wax molds.Fiberglass gelcoat molds for foam casting ,silicone spin casting molds and latex mold for plaster castings.Hobby photography
Head Hunting Iowan
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« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2010, 11:01:45 PM »

Ironclad, that's some beautiful work you have there.

x2.  Very cool.
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coop1212
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« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2010, 08:42:55 AM »

Great work!
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Clay.
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« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2010, 09:38:54 AM »

Very nice! Your website is well done also.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2010, 10:30:10 AM by Clay. » Logged
Mudcat72
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« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2010, 03:46:34 PM »

Here's a deer I just finished this week using George's method he described in the old forums...like he says above, flat black base coat...use good paint, I found out the 99 cent paint just wrinkles up in the next step...paint on metal powder in lacquer, then sand away the lacquer to reveal the metal with steel wool. I then polished it with a piece of stainless steel. I'm thinking a jewelry tumbler with stainless shot *might* work on small skulls. This skull was my 3rd project to bronze. I've gotten better each time. I can see why the skull metallizers charge what they do. Forgive the camera phone pic, but its what I had with me.

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