Deer Head Skinning Fixture for one-man shops (Usage pictures added)
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Taxidermy.Net Forum  |  Beginners, Training & Tutorials  |  Tutorials  |  Topic: Deer Head Skinning Fixture for one-man shops (Usage pictures added) « previous next »
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Author Topic: Deer Head Skinning Fixture for one-man shops (Usage pictures added)  (Read 33057 times)
Skin Deep
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« Reply #45 on: November 28, 2015, 10:05:41 PM »

thanks for the pic! I really like the concept that i will be able to turn it over and place the neck meat to skin out the mouth. I have all the wood now just need to pick up a dowel.
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Wyatt Oakley
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« Reply #46 on: November 29, 2015, 09:42:49 PM »

@ Skin believe me,  when you get it built it will be one of the best tools you have in the shop!!!  and cutting the horns off it is the best at holding a head.
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George Roof
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« Reply #47 on: November 30, 2015, 10:43:08 PM »

woakley, just a tip here.  Instead of cutting your "Y" down that far, try this.  I get in a LOT of whitetails just like that one but my "Y" is always less than 2 inches.

Set the forehead of the deer atop the stand.  That lets the neck meat stand straight up.  Roll the cape down and flesh the skin downward.  Now here's the tricky part.  At the base of the jaw and the top of the neck you will see the muscle structure form a <> diamond shape. That's over the larynx of the deer.  With nothing more than a scalpel, cut across the diamond much like the space between the symbols above (<I>).  The heavy cartilage of the larynx has a soft tissue center and you can easily cut completely through it and the esophagus.  Continue to cut straight down and you will hit dead center of the Atlas joint.  With your scalpel cut through the spinal cord.  Gently cut around the Atlas joint until you sever the two big ligaments that hold it in place.  The head will literally pop downward when you cut them.  Very carefully cut the back strap muscle and tendons  being careful not to cut through the hide and the neck meat will lift right out.  Now pull the hide back and set the face of the deer in the jig.  You can may your "V" cuts to the Atlas joint and then cut the tail of your "Y" down a couple inches.  Carefully sever the ears through the "Y" and cut the skin from under the pedicles.  Free the "Y" tab between the antlers and you'll be able to remove the entire skull through the "Y".
« Last Edit: December 06, 2015, 10:18:16 PM by George Roof » Logged

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Skin Deep
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« Reply #48 on: November 30, 2015, 10:52:17 PM »

Wow George talk about a detailed message. That was great information thanks for sharing! i always make my Y incision way longer than 2 inch's, i would say but i am embarrassed with how far off i am. If i cut them shorter i would never get the cape over the form. Are you detaching the heads from the form, to make the cape fit?
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George Roof
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« Reply #49 on: November 30, 2015, 10:57:05 PM »

LMAO  NO! I don't cut the head off, When you cut it that way, the hide will fit just fine. Just install your earliners first.  On that RARE deer that it's too tight, turn your hide inside out.  Fit the face over the manikin and then roll the cap back over the form.  You're probably trying to pull it all at once and it won't work that way.  As crude as the analogy, think of it as a condom.  Sometimes you gotta think outside the box.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2015, 10:19:29 PM by George Roof » Logged

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Mike@Tru2Life
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« Reply #50 on: December 02, 2015, 02:23:05 PM »

George always gives such good detailed instructions...if I ever had to defuse a bomb he would be the one I want talking me through the process. LOL!
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Naturalist
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« Reply #51 on: December 04, 2015, 11:58:26 AM »

woakley, just a tip here.  Instead of cutting your "Y" down that far, try this.  I get in a LOT of whitetails just like that one but my "Y" is always less than 2 inches.

Set the forehead of the deer atop the stand.  That lets the neck meat stand straight up.  Roll the cape down and flesh the skin downward.  Now here's the tricky part.  At the base of the jaw and the top of the neck you will see the muscle structure form a <> diamond shape. That's over the larynx of the deer.  With nothing more than a scalpel, cut across the diamond much like the space between the symbols above.  The heavy cartilage of the larynx as a soft tissue center and you can easily cut completely through it and the esophagus.  Continue to cut straight down and you will hit dead center of the Atlas joint.  With your scalpel cut through the spinal cord.  Gently cut around the Atlas joint until you sever the two big ligaments that hold it in place.  The head will literally pop downward when you cut them.  Very carefully cut the back strap muscle and tendons and the neck meat will lift right out.  Now pull the hide back and set the face of the dear in the jib.  You can may your "V" cuts to the Atlas joint and then cut the tail of your "Y" down a couple inches.  Carefully sever the ear through the "Y" and cut the skin from under the pedicles.  Free the "Y" tab between the antlers and you'll be able to remove the entire skull through the "Y".
Would really appreciate photo, George Roof! Not speak English, to understand clearly Your message...
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Wyatt Oakley
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« Reply #52 on: December 06, 2015, 10:05:08 AM »

Thanks George!  Most of the deer I get are not cut that far down the neck.  I knew I was cutting the Y too far, but being lazy and just didn't want to cut the neck off the head.....LOL I will have to try it on the next one in the shop. 

As usual your knowledge and willingness to share is unbelievable!!!  You have given me so many pointers since I joint this site that have helped to make my work better.   

And this device is still the most valuable tool I have in my one-man operation.....  Many customers ask what it is when I have it sitting on my bench. When I tell them what it's for they think that I came up with it, but I'm sure to tell them I am not smart enough to come up with something like this....LOL and that I found the plans on Taxidermy.net and you, George Roof, a master designed it.
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George Roof
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« Reply #53 on: December 06, 2015, 10:14:04 PM »

LOL  No "Master".  Just grew up poor in a generation that had to improvise. I went through a lot of jury rigging before I got it refined to this point.  Some people use other things that work for them and that's fine.  Others laugh at this, but I don't make any bones about it.  It gets used on EVERY DEER THAT COMES INTO MY SHOP.  I'll have guys who are generous and want to help and I tell them I honestly wouldn't know how to use help as I've become so dependant on that stand. Michael P. did convince me to use a Saw-Z-All instead of the hand saw, however. Still works great.
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Wyatt Oakley
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« Reply #54 on: December 06, 2015, 11:00:05 PM »

Yea I know about doing things the hard way..... I was using the handsaw to take the horns off but the Auodad I got in a few days ago I was having a hard time with removing the horns,  Broke out the Saw-Z-All and decided to try it again on the deer,  saves lots of time when removing antlers too!!!!! 
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Skin Deep
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« Reply #55 on: December 11, 2015, 08:40:32 AM »

Finally got mine made. I have not had a chance to use it yet, but im sure I will soon
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blingbait
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« Reply #56 on: December 11, 2015, 11:53:38 AM »

For some reason the pictures won't show for me....anyone else or am I just that stupid? 😀
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George Roof
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« Reply #57 on: December 11, 2015, 08:12:37 PM »

Bling, you can go to the Tutorial section and see if they work there.  If that doesn't get it done, PM me with an email and I'll see if I can send them in a JPG format.
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Eric Williamson
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« Reply #58 on: March 11, 2016, 10:23:40 AM »

George, Have to tell you that I saw this awhile ago and made one for this years season. It is a life saver! Thanks for posting this. "It Works"
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George Roof
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« Reply #59 on: November 14, 2017, 12:17:58 AM »

It's that time of year so imbumping this now so I dont have to look for it later.
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Taxidermy.Net Forum  |  Beginners, Training & Tutorials  |  Tutorials  |  Topic: Deer Head Skinning Fixture for one-man shops (Usage pictures added) « previous next »
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