Advice on Gobbling Turkey
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Taxidermy.Net Forum  |  Taxidermy Discussion Categories  |  Bird Taxidermy  |  Topic: Advice on Gobbling Turkey « previous next »
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Harry Whitehead
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« Reply #15 on: February 06, 2012, 07:24:05 PM »

Oops, I meant to say the neck was a little long....Anyway...Good luck!!!!
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royalpalm
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« Reply #16 on: February 06, 2012, 08:16:04 PM »

I have never seen a turkey mounted that way. All that work to the form and the things with the legs must have taken up a lot of time. I use a Tim Jordan body and i do nothing to body itself and while i am mounting it i make the legs and attach it right there into the body..you can bend your legs in any postion while mounting it. I do not understand the whole doing the body first then mounting the bird?? How do you know exactly how wide to make your drum sticks? I am very confused by this method..
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George Roof
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« Reply #17 on: February 06, 2012, 08:28:14 PM »

Just another way to "skin a cat".  Tim Jordan uses a ventral cut bird.  Cally uses a tube cut bird where it is split from knee bone/vent/kneebone and mounted sort of inferted from the front.  As you install the wings your roll the back body skin reaward and then sew and superglue your skin around the legs.  I like that way better myself, but I'm not Tim Jordan or Cally Morris.  Just the way I prefer.
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Harry Whitehead
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« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2012, 08:29:28 PM »

royalpalm, once you understand the skeletal features of turkeys this method makes way more sense than doing it any other way.  It takes a little more understanding and in time if you attempt it chances are you will do a better turkey mount.  Tim does a fine bird and I'm not really sure his methodology but this way really does work......
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DJ II
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« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2012, 09:39:53 PM »

Mr. Whitehead,

Thanks for the critique.  I've been making some adjustments and think it is looking better.  As far as the neck goes it measures 10.5 inches from the earhole to the point the neck attaches to the body.  I was thinking this was about right and could tweak it when I got the skin on.
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Aaron Stehling
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« Reply #20 on: February 07, 2012, 12:10:57 AM »

Harry

 I am with you on the mandible being down and the neck being slightly up. And I agree with Harry that the neck is to long.( BTW Harry sells some great forms DJ II ) If a bird is gobbling right out of full strut, the neck can actually be quite short.

Here is one I did recently. To me, this is accurate for a gobbling bird. Every time I mount a turk, I try to improve......so it could be different next time .

Feel free to tear into this one if you want... a good discussion on anatomy is always fun  8)

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Stehling's Taxidermy LLC
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B.Stillwell
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« Reply #21 on: February 07, 2012, 01:02:26 AM »

A couple of pics from my birds. Hope it helps.






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Harry Whitehead
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I love to hunt Buffalos!!!!!

« Reply #22 on: February 07, 2012, 06:47:30 AM »

Damn Brian, those are awesome mounts!!!!!  LMAO  As far as neck length, on a larger bird (22-24lbs) the neck length would be around 13 1/2 inches from the earhole to the first movable vertebrae which is approx 1 inch behind the attachment of the humerus.  The reason that I said that maybe the neck was too long was where the bottom of the wattles were in relation to the chest.  If you look at Brians pics you will see that the wattles are against the chest and thus showing no neck.  If you look at how the manikin is set up you will see a length of neck even after the skin is put on.  Again, without seeing it in person I can't be for sure.....

Aaron, The proportions on your bird look pretty good but you "side pockets" are more duck like than turkey like.  Taxi the skin forward so as to compact you side pocket.  It will give you a more balanced bird.  The way that it is makes the legs seem too far back.  Always remember that the weight of the bird should  be across the toes and not the heel.  Also, your scaps are a little flat for the bird to be in a full strut.....  Hope this helps, I'm not trying to knock anyone just giving my opinion...Good Luck!!!! :)
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Aaron Stehling
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« Reply #23 on: February 07, 2012, 07:18:14 AM »

Thanks Harry/ I will try to incorporate those tips into my next mount.

My client requested "gobbling, running out of full strut" . I advised a fast walk.....  :)

I tried to give the bird some forward motion, not making it too compressed in full strut.

I actually thought I made the scaps a little too "puffy" for a bird in this fast walking, gobbling pose. If you look at Stillwells birds, the scaps are flat.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2012, 07:56:24 AM by Aaron Stehling » Logged

Stehling's Taxidermy LLC
N 4027 Hwy N
Jefferson, WI 53549
Main Office  920.674.3724


  
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long spur
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« Reply #24 on: February 07, 2012, 11:48:33 AM »

Let me start by saying, Harry is the rare exception to judges. He hasn't ever judged any of my birds but we've talked on numerous occasions and he KNOWS turkey anatomy. He also does a dang good freeze dried head. He also has outstanding customer service. All of the above also applies to Brett at Boondocks.

With that said, I agree with everything Harry said. In addition, the attachment of your legs is a couple of inches high. The center of the ball of the Femur should only be about 2.5 inches above the keel/breast bone (on wild turkeys). Considering we saw this ball joint off before mounting the bird, the top of your leg bone should be just above that keel/breast line.

Aaron, I can't see anything wrong with your bird from that angle. Very nice work. Your breast feathers fall straight off the wattles. Your scaps aren't puffed, which IMO is in keeping with your breast feathers. For me, if the scaps are standing, the breast feathers should be as well, and I don't think any of us want to pull that off on a customer bird.
As for the legs and balance, a puffed up turkey's legs aren't in the center as they would be on a duck. As the chest expands with blood/air, this should create the illusion of more body in front of the legs than behind. The skeletal structure doesn't change (the legs don't move forward as the chest expands to keep the legs under center). To be clear, Harry didn't suggest that they do, but I have had bird judges that did want the legs centered on expanded breast turkeys. It just isn't physically possible.

Royalpalm, there are several benefits to putting the bird together before putting the skin on. Keep in mind, most of us have done it both ways and chose the skin off method. A turkey's legs should be 3.5 to 4.5 inches apart center to center. The same goes for the humerus bones where they attach. The only way to know that you're getting your neck right, is to know where the ball joints on the humerus bones are. From the center of the ball joints to the back of the skull/ear holes ranges from 9.5 to 12.5 inches. Considering that most of us cut off the ball joint, you can add another inch to that length and start your measurement from the cut off Humerus.
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Harry Whitehead
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Location: Lexington, Kentucky
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I love to hunt Buffalos!!!!!

« Reply #25 on: February 07, 2012, 12:01:09 PM »

Aaron, I'm not talkiing about the scaps being flat in shape, I'm talking about the scaps being too horizonal instead of more vertical.  If those hackles are up on the back then the scaps will fill the void between the wing and the back hackles.  Always make sure that the last feather on the bottom side of the scapular is touching the wing.  That is an absolute......Not many things in taxidermy are but that is one!!!!! :o
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B.Stillwell
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« Reply #26 on: February 08, 2012, 01:14:54 AM »

Harry- the pic of the bird on the limb will be an upcoming mount. Stupid bird managed to get out of the pen last spring and a neighboring hunter shot him. Now I get to mount him, guess that's one way of paying for all of the feed he ate. Thanks for all of the input on the thread. It has been like an online seminar.  ;)
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Aaron Stehling
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« Reply #27 on: February 08, 2012, 06:40:58 AM »

Thanks for the input long spur.

I see what your saying Harry, thanks. I should have tightened the bird up a little more then I did.

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Stehling's Taxidermy LLC
N 4027 Hwy N
Jefferson, WI 53549
Main Office  920.674.3724


  
 www.stehlingstaxidermy.com

Learn Taxidermy Online www.taxidermyinsider.com

DJ II
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« Reply #28 on: February 20, 2012, 08:42:40 PM »

Anyone care to critique this mount.  I see issues in the pictures that I don't see in person.  I think my main issue has something to do with the neck.  I'm not sure if it's too long or too short but know that something is not quite right with it.
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mn_jimmer
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« Reply #29 on: February 21, 2012, 02:41:23 AM »

I'm not an expert but I see a lot of grooming issues.  Your bird will look smoother and cleaner if you work on your grooming.  In general, the back edge of the feathers should be showing, and try to hide the metallic parts of the feathers.
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