Torching a form
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Taxidermy.Net Forum  |  Taxidermy Discussion Categories  |  Deer and Gameheads  |  Topic: Torching a form « previous next »
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Author Topic: Torching a form  (Read 3866 times)
Greg Livbucks
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« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2012, 10:54:42 PM »

You could media blast it with a special airbrush if you want to get really finicky.
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Matt
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« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2012, 11:00:25 PM »

Well, you asked for thoughts on this and as for mine, I wouldn't do it. It literally takes a few minutes with a scratcher and you are done, and with no health issues afterwards.
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brigham boy
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"if it's horny, mount it"

« Reply #17 on: April 08, 2012, 12:39:38 AM »

Thanks for all the input fellas. I don't even have a torch I was just curious.   I will look into that tool George that sounds great thanks.
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joeym
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« Reply #18 on: April 08, 2012, 07:27:04 AM »

Scratching a deer mannikin takes less than 5 minutes with the tool George is referring to.  I do this while waiting on bondo to kick in the ears....multitasking at its best!
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Joe Miitchell (aka jkmitch) and Joey Murphey (joeym)

Joey Murphey, Taxidermist    Chunky, Mississippi    www.mstaxidermist.com     http://wokk.com/pages/2965375.php
Matt Marulli
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« Reply #19 on: April 08, 2012, 07:39:58 AM »

If you have alot of forms to prep you can get a local kid and pull a Miagi on him. Show me, scratch the form.
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Jerry Huffaker
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« Reply #20 on: April 08, 2012, 08:47:18 AM »

The best form rougher I've found is a teenager.
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George Roof
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The older I get, the better I was.

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« Reply #21 on: April 08, 2012, 09:50:18 AM »

I don't farm mine out. I actually find it a bit relaxing to work into the detail of the form with the scratcher and insuring that I didn't miss anyplace. Where else can I make $32 an hour doing something like that. Sure beats hell out of skinning a roadkilled skunk.
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bowerbird
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« Reply #22 on: April 09, 2012, 01:12:42 AM »

I begin to shake my head at the risk AND real health issues that perpetuates in this industry. It seems that we are the only industry where OHS,,Occupation Health and Safety have not given us a good work over...yet

Could you image the automotive or home insulation industry purely as an example disclosing that they  torch foam which has   isocyanate as a component.? It was never meant to be burnt,,,tourched,,even rasped or sanded,, let alone burnt inside confined spaces! Give your fire department and insurance agent a call and see if they approve or have you covered on this in the event you burn the place down,,,i doubt it very much
And for what advantage??? so you can eventually contract some carcinogenic cancer and die??
But the mounts look good??,, 
I'm sure wners don't give too hoots over a bit of drumming on a mounted head,,the only satisfaction they are seeking is that the wife allows them to get it through the door..
As others have said, light sanding, even course scouring with steel wools and detergents are adequate to remove residue wax and the shine off urethane forms without killing yourelf in the process.
It ain't worth dying over.


http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/isocyanates/#hhe

Isocyanates are powerful irritants to the mucous membranes of the eyes and gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. Direct skin contact can also cause marked inflammation. Isocyanates can also sensitize workers, making them subject to severe asthma attacks if they are exposed again. Death from severe asthma in some sensitized subjects has been reported. Workers potentially exposed to isocyanates who experience persistent or recurring eye irritation, nasal congestion, dry or sore throat, cold-like symptoms, cough, shortness of breath, wheezing, or chest tightness should see a physician knowledgeable in work-related health problems.

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Bighunter4x4
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« Reply #23 on: April 09, 2012, 08:25:59 AM »

I wonder what Osha would say about it other than wear your respirator.  I work in an industry where brazing refrigeration lines on equipment that has been in service is part of a certain task.  The refrigerant residuals left in the compressor oil that migrate to the heat source come into contact with an open flame create phosgene gas or mustard gas.  Get a whiff of that stuff just once and you will never want to get near it again, yet it exists in the trade.  Other than co-existing with the hazards that are present in a specific career and "getting upwind" precautions what else can you do? 

Firefighters have to deal with this all the time.  It is considered a risk that they take in their job.

Other jobs have their inherent dangers as well.  The bottom line is safety is ultimately up to you and the risks the individual is willing to take.
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George Roof
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« Reply #24 on: April 09, 2012, 08:28:00 AM »

Nicely put, Bighunter
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Greg Livbucks
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« Reply #25 on: April 09, 2012, 08:52:22 AM »

A customer of mine is a tower rigger that climbs and constructs those 800 foot radio towers you see. Imagine THAT job on a windy day or ANY day for that matter. There are times that he must unhook and free climb. What does OSHA do to address that? At that point the decision is HIS over what risks he will take to retain employment.

Just gettting out of bed is a risk. Hell, even staying in bed is a risk, of a heart attack if you know what I mean. Happens every day.
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Jerry Huffaker
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« Reply #26 on: April 09, 2012, 09:05:04 AM »

 Your right Greg, there are risks in many things we do but why would you want to do something that you KNOW is going to harm you, and the one who thinks he can go to Home Depot and get one of those paint respirators and be protected is kidding himself. Speak with a firefighter, they are experts on burning gases.  Everyone makes their on choices and I have been advised that burning polyeurathane foam is extremely toxic so I say no. I don't smoke cigarettes either.
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Greg Livbucks
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« Reply #27 on: April 09, 2012, 09:07:28 AM »

I surely wouldn't do it. I would burn the nose off with my luck. Plus my wife would never tolerate it even if I did it outside. She has the nose of a beagle.

Shut up Ron!
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When our founders came here they musta been crazy to cross the ocean without insurance.
josh s.
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« Reply #28 on: April 09, 2012, 09:19:34 AM »

http://www.greatnecktools.com/products/show/CBC2

get one of these and put a  file handle on it.....fast and  simple....i still wear a mask while roughing though and it is a good workout!!
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Cole
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« Reply #29 on: April 09, 2012, 09:55:32 AM »

Burning urethane foam releases carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide and dioxins. Cancer isn't the biggest risk, instant death is.
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Cole Cruickshank
Cameron, MO 64429
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Taxidermy.Net Forum  |  Taxidermy Discussion Categories  |  Deer and Gameheads  |  Topic: Torching a form « previous next »
 



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