Mount this... "this is sad" if you like honey take note

Submitted by R.L on 8/27/06 at 10:25 PM. ( ) 68.155.165.29

Charlie Pasley, 39, died after being stung about 300 times by a swarm of bees as he was working on the roof of his home with his father, Chuck Pasley, 62. The bees attacked minutes after the pair began work on the roof of their home in the rural community of Whetstone. Chuck Pasley was stung about 100 times but suffered no serious effects.

Michael Smith, a manager for the local extermination company which removed the bees Thursday, said the hive was likely about six months old and was 2 feet wide, a foot long and five inches tall.

"It was a well-established hive," Smith said. "There were about a quarter-million bees and the honeycomb was about 70 pounds."

It was located in a space underneath the family's mobile home and was not visible. He said the family had been noticing bees flying around the area, but were not concerned.

"They weren't bothering anyone," he said. "If you stood and watched them, it was like standing in a garden where bees just come and go, minding their own business."

After the bees attacked, the two men climbed down a ladder and the elder Pasley went into the house and showered to get the bees off him. Charlie Pasley stayed outside and tried to use a water hose to ward off the bees. When the family realized he was still outside, they went outside and tried to help.

"He was lying on the ground completely surrounded by thousands and thousands of swarming bees," said Angela Pasley, his sister-in-law. "If anyone got close to where he was lying, they would attack."

Africanized bees, or "killer bees," have invaded may parts of the United States, including Arizona.

"The only bees left in Arizona in the wild are Africanized," Smith said.

Africanized bees are less selective than native bees when choosing nesting sites. Whenever swarming bees are seen moving in and out of an area near a home, it's best to find shelter and call professionals to have them removed, said Liz Barta, an educator at the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center.

The average person can tolerate between 4 to 10 bee stings per 10 pounds of body weight unless they are allergic to the insects, Barta said. In a 150-pound person, that equates to about 100 stings.

Pasley was from Redding, Calif., and moved to Whetstone in 2003. He is survived by two daughters, his parents and two brothers.

___

Information from: Sierra Vista Herald, http://www.svherald.com

Copyright 2006 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.












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"He was lying on the ground completely surrounded by thousands and thousands of swarming bees," said Angela Pasley, his sister-in-law. "If anyone got close to where he was lying, they would attack."




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