Changing the color of a deer rack

Submitted by Dan on 01/10/2003. ( Pyle@aristotle.net ) 206.66.231.23

This year I killed a 10 buck in North Arkansas. I am having it mounted but I brought the antlers home to see if I could clean them
up some. They are a strange blotchy or greyish stained white. Some
areas are ok but there are numerous blotchy spots. I don't know what
caused them but I wanted to get rid of them if I could. I thought that this was caused by the velvet but don't know. I washed them
in soap and water with a brush and no luck. I tried using a brillo
soap pad and no luck again so I quit. When the antlers dried, they
were now blotchy AND real flat colored or dull. What I want to do
is remove the blotches and make them white or color them a more
natural look and put a bit of a lustre back on them. In short, I
want them to look good. Anybody know how I can do that?
Thanks,
Dan

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Go back to your original post the answer is posted there.

This response submitted by John C on 01/10/2003. ( ) 64.216.172.20

No need to repeat the question. the answer is back there.


There it is

This response submitted by John C on 01/10/2003. ( ) 64.216.172.20

Changing the color of a weird colored deer rack
Submitted by Dan on 01/07/2003. ( pyle@aristotle.net ) 206.66.231.154
This year I killed a 10 buck in North Arkansas. I am having it mounted but I brought the antlers home to see if I could clean them
up some. They are a strange blotchy or greyish stained white. Some
areas are ok but there are numerous blotchy spots. I don't know what
caused them but I wanted to get rid of them if I could. I thought that this was caused by the velvet but don't know. I washed them
in soap and water with a brush and no luck. I tried using a brillo
soap pad and no luck again so I quit. When the antlers dried, they
were now blotchy AND real flat colored or dull. What I want to do
is remove the blotches and make them white or color them a more
natural look and put a bit of a lustre back on them. In short, I
want them to look good. Anybody know how I can do that?
Thanks,
Dan

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Well, since I am from N. Ark.
This response submitted by John C on 01/07/2003. ( ) 64.216.172.79
Been in this hills a long, long time, I have seen few white antlers, very few.

What you are seeing in quite normal for these deer

The only way I know of to fix it, is for yu too paint the antlers almond color, (Krylon) give it several days to dry.

Now buff them with course steel wool removing the shine.

NOw using a raw umber pigment, stain the antlers. once this is dry, well kind of, using 0000 steel wool buff off the pigment. Artist oil paints work very well.

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blotches

This response submitted by Bill Yox on 01/11/2003. ( ) 64.12.96.78

Those blotches are the actual antler density. It varies throughout the antler on some racks. Some years a deer has them, other years he doesnt. It sometimes is a reflection of his health and/or his diet changes. I refer to it as marbling. I wouldnt have scoured it with any abrasive, you will rub off the outer "gloss" or patina of natural antlers, similar to real eary season antlers fresh out of velvet.


Think thin

This response submitted by cur on 01/11/2003. ( wildart ) 66.90.179.3

I agree with Bill Yox about no abrasive materials. He is also keerect about the cause. The best way to even out the surface is by using stains that will uniformally pigment the surface without changing the patina.

To do this, you will need two types of paint: Acrylic paints, such as the "Folk Art" series from plaid, which are available from hobby shops, and the Windso Newton "Alkyd" paints.

The plaid paints are ultimate flat in finish and have a bit of tooth for the second step application of the Alkyd colors.

Alkyds are resin pigments similar to oil paint, but with a much faster drying time, and much better translucency and surface for taxidermy applications.

First, mix burnt umber, white, ochre, and burnt sienna and black if necessary to obtain a gray tone. Add small amounts of the pigments to white until the color matches the base tone of the antlers.

To apply, wipe the antlers down with a quality degreaser, rinse and allow to dry. Then wipe with a rag dampened with acetone or xylol. After the wipe, brush on a coat of the mixed acrylic colors and then wipe off with a soft cotton cloth (Old Tee shirt) that is damp, but not soaking wet. Wipe carefully to leave enough acrylic pigment to even out the color, but not a solid coating of paint. After the coat dries, you can thin some of the mixed color and spray thin amounts at random to even out the color, if necessary. You can also apply thinned paint with a 3/4 inch flat brush to even out. Just DON'T use too much paint.

When you are satisfied with the base tone, mix the alkyd paints to match the second or darker tone with burnt umber, black, and burnt sienna if needed. Thin with mineral spirits. Apply liberally with a soft paint brush, and then wipe off with a soft cloth dampened with mineral spirits. When dry, the effect should be soft, natural, and leave open pores and surface markings intact and unfilled. After the alkyd dries overnight, it may be coated with wax, matte clear, or what have you.

Practice on waste antler material if need be.

Good luck

Cur


Why not

This response submitted by Elmer on 01/14/2003. ( Tops ) 152.163.189.171

Let him go by next time and wait for the one that has the natural pattern you are looking for. It is nature a story in itself, something you should cherrish as far as look good I would want the mount to be nice the antlers are the reason you harvested the animal. Just my opinion.


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