wild boar & hair slipping

Submitted by Witty on 7/2/00. ( witty56308@yahoo.com ) 206.147.21.93

Will the hair slip out on a wild boar that is shoot in July? And if you have any tips on doing hogs I could use them to, since it will be my first.
Witty

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I've done some

This response submitted by Tony Finazzo on 7/2/00. ( finazducks@aol.com ) 152.163.189.67

I've done enough boars to know a little about their skin. The hardest part is fleshing the shoulders because of the thick armor or grissel. Also because there is so much fat in the flesh it is more difficult to flesh than other animals. The hair stays pretty good unless you cut the roots off during fleshing. One thing I have done with boars is to do quite a bit of fleshing, and split the eyes nose and lips, turn the ears. and than salt the cape and refrigerate overnite. This firms up the flesh on the face and allows you to flesh the face and the split lips and nose much easier. You don't have to refrigerate if it is not to hot, and you have a cool place to keep your cape over night. Make sure you get all the fat off so you don't loose any dermis on the hair side.
I'm sure some of the experts on pigs can give you good advise, but if I can help any more call or email.
Tony Finazzo (909)-886-8640


Hawgs

This response submitted by George Roof on 7/2/00. ( georoof@aol.com ) 152.163.188.199

Witty,
A wild boar is just as tough after it's dead as it was when it was alive. I know a guy who capes it out and lays it out in the sun for a few days before he fleshes it. He swears the shield will come off easier this way, but I'm not going there.

Hogs are the perfect animal to convince you you need a fleshing machine if you don't already have one. That shield will turn your fingers raw if you have to do it with a scalpel. If you DO, I suggest you "draw" one inch strips with your scalpel and flesh it one strip at a time.

When you select a form, I'd suggest either Rick Carter's or supply Mike Noonkester Supplys. Their jaw sets are just as good and look for all the world like real teeth. I like the IQ boar eyes from Tohickon. I was once told to use wolf eyes to add fierceness to the mount, but besides making the hog look goofy, good eyes will give you as much meanness as you'd ever want. I use the real nose, but lots of folks use the artificial. Using the artificial may be a little easier in some ways, but you lose the prickly hairs that are all over a real nose.


Dave Says:

This response submitted by It wudn't me! on 7/2/00. ( ddt@bayou.com ) 209.209.198.146

(LOL) I know ya'll think I'm crazy, but "for the record", I'm not the one George is talking about concerning laying the skin out in the sun. I believe you should treat a hog skin with the same care as others, they are tough, but they will slip(I've noticed that when a spot slips, the hair stays in, but the top layer of skin comes off---very strange--)anyway, I've never managed to flesh one on a machine. I use a fleshing beam and a big ass knife(a 12 inch butcher knife), use both hands(hold with one, push with the other), and push the shield off one chunk at a time. I have experimented with others tools that can work OK also--Scapels, steak knife, fish skinning knife(some aren't sharp enough), plain ole pocket knife, dremel with a cutting disk---with any of these tools, you should be careful and take it one piece at a time. experiment and decide what works best for you(almost everyone I know uses something different)

Here's some HOG HINTS-----
**you should flesh down until the hair roots are visible.(on sides and back)
** You need to de-grease your pig--I use gas, but paint thinner would be safer.(wash, de-grease, wash, peserve or tan, then mount)
**D.P. works fine after de-greasing, and I'm sure tanning is fine also.
**WASCO sells 2 excellent pig forms--the one by Carter that George mentioned, and another line with a more narrow face that works better for the "russian" boar.Both are Excellent.
**for simplicity, the Noonkester jawset is ideal, and it is made to fit those forms(or vice versa).
**Bear eyes are generally recommended for pigs, but I prefer a dark brown eye instead.I think it looks more natural.
** if your customer wants the real tusks, saw the lower jaw off near the hinge, then boil for a while--the tusks will tap right out of the jawbone. You can crack the fakes off the jawset, and glue the real ones in place.
** if you want to use the real jawset, boil and clean it, and before re-installing, coat the teeth at the gum-line with a 5 minute epoxy, this will prevent them from working loose later.
** on pigs, I prefer to dremel a small lipline around the open mouth. after the skin is tucked and dries, it leaves a much cleaner line to blend with your mouth interior.
**if you have a skin repair or slipped spot, you can blend it with spray paint that matches your hair color.(or skin dye, just like you'd do on a bear)
** if you want your pig to look good, you have to get the hair to stand up. not just on top, but also on the jawline and cheek area.
**You can pull the hair forward and pour coarse sawdust over it to keep it standing tall. I have actually used spray glue instead, but you'll have to clean the residue off later after everything sets.

Can't think of anything else right now, but just ask if you have any more questions.

Good Luck
Dave


hide any repairs

This response submitted by don on 7/3/00. ( ) 199.171.212.100

A great way to cover any repairs on the skin, nose, ears or around the eyes is with "mud". Mix up some dirt, sand or a mixture to match the area the pig came from, with white glue amd apply to the "bad" areas. It will stick to the hair and what ever you want. It looks natural as you can get and the customers love it. Thats what the nasty things look like when you kill-em anyway. The first time I tryed this is with a hog that a customer brought in after he caped it. I think he used a chainsaw and a sledge hammed. A patch about the size of your hand was missing from the chest so I patched it by sewing pieces from the cut off. I tryed to match the hair patterns as best as I could. After it dryed I sealed the seem lines with Epoxy putty and blended with the airbrush. Then I "ran him through the mud". I have guys asking for this on good skins now. Try it, you will like it!


boar hide fleshing

This response submitted by mbchoate on 7/20/00. ( mbchoate_2000@yahoo.com ) 207.144.243.13

when fleshing a hog with thick grissle i use a beam. hook the ear on the end of beam nearest you and start fleshing to end of cape. the best knives to use are the "old hickory" brandof knives. on really thick, nasty hices i use a 2and one half foot machete. the technique to learn is that when you start your cut go down to the hair roots then lay blade flat and push away all the time applying lots of weight on the blade.(it actually bends when i do it). i am the primary flesher at a taxidermy shop that mounts 300-350 wild boar a year. i can flesh the average boar hide in 30-45minutes. if you are interested in a video of me leshing a boar head call me at 931-879-6340 or email me at mbchoate_2000@yahoo.com and i'll send you one!


fleshing boar hide with leshing machine

This response submitted by matt choate on 7/20/00. ( mbchoate_2000@yahoo.com ) 207.144.243.202

FLESHING MACHINE WILL NOT WORK ! ON THE AVG. BOAR HIDE THEY WONT EVEN MAKE A DENT . WE TRIED AND WHEN YOU PUT A LITTLE PRESSURE AGAINST THE BLADE IT COMPLETELY BOGGED THE MOTOTR DOWN. THEY ARE USELESS! GET YOU A GOOD "OLD HICKORY BUTCHER KNIFE SET AND GO TO TOWN, IF THE GRISSEL ON SHOULDERS IS BAD GET YOU A 2 FOOT MACHETE. I DO THE FACE SHOULDERS ,ALL BUT THE NOSE WITH THE "OLD HICKORIES" AND MACHETE!


That @#$#% SHIELD

This response submitted by TP on 8/9/00. ( ) 216.208.65.59

Food for thought gentlemen,I work 6 month's out of the year in
the Czech Republic. I see,skin,& scrape more @#$% pig's than one
can imagine.To scrape the "shield",i made a 6 inch wide cheese
slicer,works great! You can flesh the thickest hide in 15 mins.
Best part,you can never make a hole. Just get a beautiful golf
ball hide!
Try it,you'll be amazed.


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