CWD in 14 new Counties in Wisconsin

Submitted by Mr. KIM on 03/13/2004 at 16:15. ( ) 205.188.209.75

Just passing this information on to all of you in Wisconsin. Hope it can be of help to those that like to keep up to date.---KIM

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE: New testing finds indicators of deer disease in 14 new counties

WAUSAU, Wis. The state Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory found preliminary indicators of chronic wasting disease in wild deer in more than a dozen additional counties using a new testing method approved by the federal government, according to state records the Associated Press reviewed.

However, the results of the new testing designed only to screen for the disease, not officially diagnose it could not be confirmed with a second test considered the "gold standard" for diagnosing CWD.

Thus, the state Department of Natural Resources has added no new counties to the list of eight with confirmed cases of the always-fatal brain disease.

A landowners group critical of the DNR's handling of the disease says hunters should be told deer are testing positive for the disease with one test but not the other, giving them the most complete information in deciding whether to eat the venison.

Citizens and Landowners for a Rational Response believes the results of the new testing likely provide early evidence that CWD is more widespread across the state, said spokesman Mark Peck, a landowner from Arena.

"We have two testing regimens in the state, of which we are coming up with differing results," Peck told the Associated Press. "As a hunting enthusiast I would like to know which one we can put our stock in."

The screening test is designed to produce some false positive results so no animals with the disease are missed, DNR wildlife veterinarian Julie Langenberg said.

Still, Langenberg acknowledges "there's a possibility" the new test is detecting some deer at an earlier stage of the disease.

The DNR found chronic wasting disease in three bucks shot near Mount Horeb in 2002, marking the first time it was found east of the Mississippi River.

The disease threatens Wisconsin's annual $1 billion deer-hunting industry because health experts warn no part of a diseased deer should be eaten. There is no scientific evidence the disease, discovered in Colorado in 1967, can infect people.

Testing so far found 316 wild deer with the disease in eight southern counties Columbia, Dane, Iowa, Kenosha, Richland, Rock, Sauk and Walworth, the DNR reports.

According to state documents the AP reviewed, deer that tested positive on the new IDEXX screening test were found in 14 additional counties Chippewa, Crawford, Dodge, Eau Claire, Grant, Jefferson, LaFayette, Manitowoc, Marinette, Marquette, Portage, Taylor, Vernon and Waukesha.

Marinette County is some 200 miles north of Mount Horeb.

Dr. Mark Hall, head of pathology at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, said the IDEXX test is certified by USDA as only accurate enough as a screening tool.

Chronic wasting disease can only be confirmed by the "gold standard" or immunohistochemisty test, which has been used for more than 20 years, he said.

A positive IDEXX test detects abnormal proteins, or prions, which cause chronic wasting disease.

It does not necessarily mean the deer is in the disease's early stages, but "clearly, that is a possibility," Hall said. "My best science tells me that those animals do not have evidence of the disease sufficient to make the diagnosis."

TEST NOT PERFECT

Since last fall's hunting season, the state Diagnostics Laboratory tested 9,476 deer with the IDEXX test. Lab director Robert Schull said 159 of them tested positive or scored at least 0.15 on a sliding scale to 4.0 and were retested with the older test.

Chronic wasting disease was confirmed in 42 deer, with final test results for another seven deer still unknown Wednesday, the records the AP reviewed showed.

The findings indicate the IDEXX test produced more than 100 false positives, about 1 percent of the total sample.

Tom Mikulka, a marketing manager for IDEXX Laboratories Inc., of Westbook, Maine, said his company's so-called rapid test for chronic wasting disease gives a laboratory an "initial reactor" about whether a deer has the disease.

A score of 1 or more generally would always be confirmed as positive by the second diagnostic test, he said.

But deer from Lafayette, Marinette and Marquette counties had an IDEXX result of more than 1, and the second, confirmation test was negative, state records show.

"My test can be wrong sometimes. It is good, but it's not perfect," Mikulka said.

The Wisconsin laboratory is the only one of 26 USDA approved labs in the United States currently using the IDEXX test, Mikulka said.

Barb Powers, director of Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostics Laboratory in Fort Collins, Colo., said her laboratory has tested 47,000 deer or elk for chronic wasting disease using a USDA-certified screening test from Bio-Rad Laboratories, a competitor of the IDEXX test that uses similar technology.

It found only three false positives, she said.

Powers is so confident a positive result with the Bio-Rad test means the animal has chronic wasting disease that she believes the test can stand alone, but the company and USDA recommends the second confirmation test.

Hunters in Colorado and Wyoming are told the results of the screening tests. Wisconsin hunters are not given that information, Langenberg said.

Peck questions how there can be so many false positives in the Wisconsin IDEXX samples.

"My fear is maybe we are not getting a true picture of where CWD exists in the state," he said. "We would suspect it was elsewhere based on those test results."


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Where did you get this article?

This response submitted by marty on 03/13/2004 at 18:06. ( ) 67.173.51.16

Sounds to me that there's some small room for error. But that's WAy too many positives to ignore.

Where did you get this info Mr. Kim?


?

This response submitted by Len on 03/13/2004 at 18:09. ( lengums@wi.rr.com ) 24.209.159.239

Mr. Kim,, If the new testing is not accurate and the "gold test" is the only real accurate test at this time, how can you title the above article as " CWD found in 14 new Counties in Wisconsin " The Gold Test did not show any CWD on the deer with the new test method. It is being assumed that it could be, but no verification.You should also break down the Verified CWD deer in each county, as it would point to a core area where the majority of the CWD have been found. Only 1 deer so far has been tested positive in Kenosha county( only 3 miles from my home) and only 2 so far in Walworth county.These 3 deer were tested with the Gold method, not the new method. Many tests from private firms in the fall of 2002 which were showing postive cases throughout Wisconsin. Many were retested again using the Gold method and all were negative.So before you panic everybody,watch how you label your articles.


Hope this helps

This response submitted by Mr. KIM on 03/13/2004 at 19:41. ( ) 152.163.252.167

I traced back the info I got and received the web site:

http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/news/local/states/wisconsin/8155037.htm


The same article I found which was sent to me!

This response submitted by Mr. KIM on 03/13/2004 at 19:44. ( ) 152.163.252.167

Posted on Thu, Mar. 11, 2004


CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE: New testing finds indicators of deer disease in 14 new counties

BY ROBERT IMRIE
Associated Press

WAUSAU, Wis. The state Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory found preliminary indicators of chronic wasting disease in wild deer in more than a dozen additional counties using a new testing method approved by the federal government, according to state records the Associated Press reviewed.

However, the results of the new testing designed only to screen for the disease, not officially diagnose it could not be confirmed with a second test considered the "gold standard" for diagnosing CWD.

Thus, the state Department of Natural Resources has added no new counties to the list of eight with confirmed cases of the always-fatal brain disease.

A landowners group critical of the DNR's handling of the disease says hunters should be told deer are testing positive for the disease with one test but not the other, giving them the most complete information in deciding whether to eat the venison.

Citizens and Landowners for a Rational Response believes the results of the new testing likely provide early evidence that CWD is more widespread across the state, said spokesman Mark Peck, a landowner from Arena.

"We have two testing regimens in the state, of which we are coming up with differing results," Peck told the Associated Press. "As a hunting enthusiast I would like to know which one we can put our stock in."

The screening test is designed to produce some false positive results so no animals with the disease are missed, DNR wildlife veterinarian Julie Langenberg said.

Still, Langenberg acknowledges "there's a possibility" the new test is detecting some deer at an earlier stage of the disease.

The DNR found chronic wasting disease in three bucks shot near Mount Horeb in 2002, marking the first time it was found east of the Mississippi River.

The disease threatens Wisconsin's annual $1 billion deer-hunting industry because health experts warn no part of a diseased deer should be eaten. There is no scientific evidence the disease, discovered in Colorado in 1967, can infect people.

Testing so far found 316 wild deer with the disease in eight southern counties Columbia, Dane, Iowa, Kenosha, Richland, Rock, Sauk and Walworth, the DNR reports.

According to state documents the AP reviewed, deer that tested positive on the new IDEXX screening test were found in 14 additional counties Chippewa, Crawford, Dodge, Eau Claire, Grant, Jefferson, LaFayette, Manitowoc, Marinette, Marquette, Portage, Taylor, Vernon and Waukesha.

Marinette County is some 200 miles north of Mount Horeb.

Dr. Mark Hall, head of pathology at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, said the IDEXX test is certified by USDA as only accurate enough as a screening tool.

Chronic wasting disease can only be confirmed by the "gold standard" or immunohistochemisty test, which has been used for more than 20 years, he said.

A positive IDEXX test detects abnormal proteins, or prions, which cause chronic wasting disease.

It does not necessarily mean the deer is in the disease's early stages, but "clearly, that is a possibility," Hall said. "My best science tells me that those animals do not have evidence of the disease sufficient to make the diagnosis."

TEST NOT PERFECT

Since last fall's hunting season, the state Diagnostics Laboratory tested 9,476 deer with the IDEXX test. Lab director Robert Schull said 159 of them tested positive or scored at least 0.15 on a sliding scale to 4.0 and were retested with the older test.

Chronic wasting disease was confirmed in 42 deer, with final test results for another seven deer still unknown Wednesday, the records the AP reviewed showed.

The findings indicate the IDEXX test produced more than 100 false positives, about 1 percent of the total sample.

Tom Mikulka, a marketing manager for IDEXX Laboratories Inc., of Westbook, Maine, said his company's so-called rapid test for chronic wasting disease gives a laboratory an "initial reactor" about whether a deer has the disease.

A score of 1 or more generally would always be confirmed as positive by the second diagnostic test, he said.

But deer from Lafayette, Marinette and Marquette counties had an IDEXX result of more than 1, and the second, confirmation test was negative, state records show.

"My test can be wrong sometimes. It is good, but it's not perfect," Mikulka said.

The Wisconsin laboratory is the only one of 26 USDA approved labs in the United States currently using the IDEXX test, Mikulka said.

Barb Powers, director of Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostics Laboratory in Fort Collins, Colo., said her laboratory has tested 47,000 deer or elk for chronic wasting disease using a USDA-certified screening test from Bio-Rad Laboratories, a competitor of the IDEXX test that uses similar technology.

It found only three false positives, she said.

Powers is so confident a positive result with the Bio-Rad test means the animal has chronic wasting disease that she believes the test can stand alone, but the company and USDA recommends the second confirmation test.

Hunters in Colorado and Wyoming are told the results of the screening tests. Wisconsin hunters are not given that information, Langenberg said.

Peck questions how there can be so many false positives in the Wisconsin IDEXX samples.

"My fear is maybe we are not getting a true picture of where CWD exists in the state," he said. "We would suspect it was elsewhere based on those test results."



Thanks Mr. Kim...

This response submitted by marty on 03/14/2004 at 09:36. ( ) 67.173.51.16

Sounds to me like this test COULD be detecting early stages of CWD that the other test cannot find. I guess this test - tests in the lymph nodes vs. the brain (?) It has a tendancy to show false positives. Too many to be ignored though, and I'm sure the Wis. DNR is looking into things.

I beleive the DNR steered away from private testing for the very reasons this newspaper article brings forth. The Wisconsin DNR does not believe in their accuracy. And it's a newspaper article, so I'll take that for what it's worth. Given Wisconsin's EXTENSIVE research on the matter, I think I'll wait and see what they have to say before I draw any conclusions. Thanks...


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