Shop heaters?

Submitted by Steve on 10/26/05 at 9:03 AM. ( ) 12.177.8.34

I just got a new shop and I am looking to upgrade my heating source. It currently has a bigger propane heater with the vent pipe and all. I am wanting to take it out and put in one of the wall mount propane heaters. I am either going with a blue flame or a radiant style. Just curious if anyone else uses these and what you would recomend. I really like the radiant, but am worried about it drying out the mounts too fast. With a blue flame I would think would be better with the circulating warm air.

Any comments or suggestions would be greatly appreciated! Thanks.....

Return to The Taxidermy Industry Category Menu


heaters

This response submitted by dan on 10/26/05 at 9:33 AM. ( ) 216.56.60.34

Steve, I used to be in the HVAC industry and installed a lot of heating equipment. 1) Check with your local building inspecter,(some local codes exceed National fuel and vent codes) AND your insurance company to see what they will allow. My advise is a "direct-vent" through the wall type heater. These are sealed combustion type gas heaters. The advantages are: Safety for you, no exposed flame. Which is kind of handy if you do a lot of air brushing with lacquer. They meet or exceed most codes (insurance companys love that). Energy efficency is quite competitive when compared to similar shop heaters. They are easy to install. See your local heating contracter, they may have other recommendations too. My shop is 24x18 and heats with a 36k btu D/vent heater. A bit over-sized for now, but I will be expanding soon. Good luck. Dan


Heat Pump

This response submitted by J Best on 10/26/05 at 1:11 PM. ( ) 207.118.217.160

I'm not sure what your budget allows, but a heat pump may be an option. A heat pump is something that's been catching my eye lately. It also works as an air conditioner in the summer, and there is no fuel needed. (Runs off electricity)
It looks like a standard air conditioner condenser (outside unit), but it's somewhat larger, and it works by drawing the heat out of the outside air. Some of the better ones function down to around 0 degrees F. Even though the outside air is cold, there is still heat in it, and the heat pump draws it out, and basically works like a furnace. You would need an air handler in the shop or something to mount the coil in, and blow the air, but just thought I would mention it as an option. My father is a union HVAC/pipefitter tech, and recently installed a heat pump in his home. Seems to be working great so far, but we are in Wisconsin, so I'm curious to see how it will work in December and Jan. Good luck.


Return to The Taxidermy Industry Category Menu