Antelope slippage

Submitted by Dan M on 1/5/02. ( ) 209.149.145.250

I have used dry preservative on whitetails, etc. with very good results. After going out west I decided to do my mulie and antelope the "right" way. The mulie was wet tanned by a highly recommended tannery and resulted in a cape that was significantly smaller than my measurements, with zero stretch and slippage under the throat patch. I pitched it and will go with a european mount. With that experience, I elected to liqua-tan my antelope and after fleshing, pickling and final shaving I had a perfect cape but noticed slippage a little bigger than a quarter also under the chin in two spots( below gland ). I went ahead and applied the liqua-tan and after tonight I will freeze it. Any suggestions on how to proceed ? Will this slippage spread ? Can I cut the slipping area out and try to sew up and hide it ? Are mulies and antelopes more prone to slippage? I caped and froze both animals myself hours after shooting. Thanks.

Return to Tanning Category Menu


You caped and froze only hours after shooting

This response submitted by John C on 1/6/02. ( ) 208.44.115.41

What happened, was when you rolled the capes up they did not freeze in the center where the head was for several days, then when you thawed them you did not watch them and unrolled as they thawed.

Also letting body fluids pool helped slippage.

Can you fix them, I dont know your ability, I bet I could, but then the capes should have been salted with in hours and not frozen.

Go try to repair both of them, you never know your ability until you are put into that position.

Do you think all we mount are perfect capes? Not a chance is Hades.

Yep I was ruff on ya, but not a taxidermist alive has never or will never work with a problem cape or skin.

It is part of the job discription.


Lay out flat opened

This response submitted by Paul on 1/6/02. ( ) 68.38.185.144

in freezer until it starts to freeze than fold and bag. This assures it freezes evenly.


Shaving!

This response submitted by Bruce Rittel on 1/6/02. ( rittel@mindspring.com ) 165.247.11.18

One of the things I learned when I first started doing Taxidermy - was that you "back off" shaving on Antelope! Most of the ones taken are still very thinly fleshed and if I did shave I simply touched up the head area. I've seen some shaved antelope capes where I could actually "punch" the hair thru the flesh - thats taboo!

Although this may or not be the problem, I did notice that you said you shaved it - but hopefully not heavily, and only a touch up thing!Yes - Antelope are special - dont shave them like a WT Deer!

Bruce Rittel
Rittels Tanning Supplies


my first antelope

This response submitted by Eric on 1/6/02. ( www.Magee@Pathway.net ) 64.210.53.55

Dan,
Just wanted to let you know that I am a beginner working on my firtst antelope, I'm looking for my THIRD cape! It has been a nightmare, BUT I have learned a lot and it has been extremely humbling! Good luck to ya! Eric


Thanks to all

This response submitted by Dan M on 1/6/02. ( ) 204.178.119.103

I appreciate the advise. I love doing taxidermy and over the past 4 years or so have done about 30 wt deer, 3 turkeys, bobcats, foxes, coons, etc.. Just when I think I,m good - WHAM! John C mentioned that there are very few "perfect" specimens and I realize that I fall short in the area of repair, etc..I also am confused on dp versus tanning. My deer mounted with dp look better than most "professional" mounts in my area and outdoor shows and shops but in watching this web site and talking to taxidermists every chance I get it seems to be a poorer way of mounting.I have played around with liqua-tan and a few commercial tans but will always have a far better cape as far as stretch, looks, etc. I'll tackle the antelope in a few weeks when the form comes in. Thanks again


hair slipping

This response submitted by tanner on 1/9/02. ( ) 216.234.218.247

when mixing your pickle bath ,us alumium sulfate nice and rich and watch your ph . this will take care of any slipping.


Slipage

This response submitted by Paul P on 1/12/02. ( sivkofur@aol.com ) 65.172.27.250

All of the above are good ideas but they need to be done together. Antilope are always difficult. Slipping can be slowed by a combination of things.

The fist is the care after it is shot. Like the guys above said it needs to be frozen in a way that the whole cape is frozen, so don't roll it up. The next is salting properly. Then the soak should have a ph around 3.

You can do all of these perfectly and still have slipage. I had two shot at the same time with the same prep, soak, pickle, tan, one had slipage the other was perfect. Some animals are sick. Others have the bacteria on there skin when they are alive. Good luck!

Paul


Return to Tanning Category Menu