chemical for tanning hides

Submitted by marcus on 04/26/2004 at 08:33. ( ) 68.2.201.44

can you use p-benzoquinone for tanning a hide.
if so how would i do it. i am a photographer,
and this is used as an oxidizing agent in developing film.
My friend told me that it is used in tanning hides.
I didn't believe him, so here I am asking for the truth.

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Probably could

This response submitted by cyclone on 04/27/2004 at 15:27. ( ) 129.43.43.200

It contains the double bond to oxygen (the qinone) which would act as the linking agent between the proteins. It should work much the same as formaldehyde. I don't know any secret formulas (trade formulas) so I can't say if anyone uses it or not. However, it is quite toxic as you can gather from the MSDS.

Synonyms: 2,5-Cyclohexadiene-1,4-dione; Quinone; p-Benzoquinone solution; 1,4-benzoquinone Quinone; Benzoquinone; 90%; p-Benzoquinone 98+ % (dried); p-Benzoquinone
Molecular Formula: C6H4O2
Formula Weight: 108.09
Registry number: 106-51-4


Registry number: 106-51-4
Density: 1.31
Melting point: 112-116 °C
Flash point: 180 °C


Hazard Symbol
T Toxic
N Dangerous for the environment


Risk Description
R23/25 Toxic by inhalation and if swallowed.
R36/37/38 Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and skin.
R50 Very toxic to aquatic organisms.


Safety Description
S26 In case of contact with eyes, rinse immediately with plenty of water and seek medical advice.
S28A After contact with skin, wash immediately with plenty of water.
S45 In case of accident of if you feel unwell, seek medical advice immediately (show the label where possible).
S61 Avoid release to the environment. Refer to special instructions / Safety data sheets.


IR
Analysis Result
Miscellaneous 412 (15.14); 895 (3.37); 941 (11.45); 1082 (10.48); 1306 (7.61); 1363 (24.78); 1588 (8.21); 1647; 3054 (20.14)



Miscellaneous information
Analysis Result
203-405-2
Useful for the determination of amino acids by the formation of red charge-transfer complexes. Clin. Chem., 20, 1553(1974).The 1: 1 and 2: 1 adducts of cyclopentadiene with p-benzoquinone: P. Yates, K. Switlak; Can. J. Chem. 68, 10, 1894-1900(1990).A new selective reagent for oxidation of alcohols: M.G. Kulkarni, S.T. Mathew; Tetrahedron Lett. 31, 31, 4497-5000(1990).
2D Molfile Get the molfile

Minimised model


Better yet

This response submitted by cyclone on 04/27/2004 at 15:32. ( ) 129.43.43.200

From the EPA's website....

Quinone (p-Benzoquinone)
106-51-4
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Hazard Summary
Occupational exposure to quinone may occur in the dye, textile, chemical, tanning, and cosmetic industries. Acute (short-term) exposure to high levels of quinone, via inhalation in humans, results in irritation of the eyes, consisting of discoloration of the conjunctiva and cornea, and causes dermatitis from dermal exposure. Chronic (long-term) inhalation exposure to quinone in humans may result in visual disturbances, and chronic dermal contact causes skin ulceration. No information is available on the reproductive, developmental, or carcinogenic effects of quinone in humans. The results of available animal studies are insufficient to evaluate the carcinogenicity of quinone. EPA has not evaluated quinone for carcinogenicity.

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Please Note: The main sources of information for this fact sheet are the Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), a database of summaries of peer-reviewed literature, and the Handbook of Toxic and Hazardous Chemicals and Carcinogens. Other secondary sources include the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS), a database of toxic effects that are not peer reviewed, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) monographs on chemicals carcinogenic to humans.
Uses
Quinone is used as a chemical intermediate, a polymerization inhibitor, an oxidizing agent, a photographic chemical, a tanning agent, and a chemical reagent. (5)
Sources and Potential Exposure
Occupational exposure to quinone may occur in the dye, textile, chemical, tanning, and cosmetic industries. (1)
Inhalation exposure to quinone may occur from tobacco smoke. (2)
Assessing Personal Exposure
No information is available on the assessment of personal exposure to quinone.
Health Hazard Information
Acute Effects:
Acute exposure to high levels of quinone, via inhalation in humans, is highly irritating to the eyes, resulting in discoloration of the conjunctiva and cornea, while dermal exposure causes dermatitis with skin discoloration and erythema. (1,2,5)
Animal studies have reported effects on the kidneys from exposure to quinone. (2)
Tests involving acute exposure of rats have shown quinone to have high acute toxicity from oral exposure. (3)
Chronic Effects (Noncancer):
Chronic dermal contact to quinone in humans may result in skin ulceration, while chronic inhalation exposure may result in visual disturbances. (1,2)
EPA has not established a Reference Concentration (RfC) or Reference Dose (RfD) for quinone. (4)
Reproductive/Developmental Effects:
No information is available on the reproductive or developmental effects of quinone in humans or animals.
Cancer Risk:
No information is available on the carcinogenic effects of quinone in humans.
Quinone has been tested (in older animal studies) by dermal application, inhalation, and subcutaneous injection. However, the results are insufficient to evaluate the carcinogenicity of the compound. (5)
EPA has not classified quinone for carcinogenicity. (4)
IARC has classified quinone as a Group 3, not classifiable as to the carcinogenicity to humans. (5)
Physical Properties
Quinone exists as yellow prisms, with a penetrating odor resembling that of chlorine. (5)
The odor threshold for quinone is 0.084 parts per million (ppm). (6)
The chemical formula for quinone is C6H4O2, and the molecular weight is 108.1 g/mol. (1)
The log octanol/water partition coefficient (log Kow) for quinone is 0.20. (2)


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