When slipage will occur

Submitted by Jeff on 9/23/05 at 10:01 PM. ( ) 142.165.116.142

Im new to this gig, and the thought of hair slippage on a customers mount realy concernes me. At what point in the tanning will you see the hair fall out? Is it possible to salt, pickle and tan the hide only to see it fall out while mounting? I have read how alum in the pickle will help even more to lock hairs, would it be overkill to always have alum in the pickle as well as apply stop rot to each skin?

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slip

This response submitted by Mr.T on 9/23/05 at 10:37 PM. ( ) 64.31.6.222

When I started, my second cape that I did was slipping in the pickle. This was a cape that was fleshed, salted and air dried rock hard. I rehydrated it in salt water, and before it was even pliable, there was loads of hair floating on top. Even more in the pickle, what did I know; my first cape didn't do this. I cut the slip spots out and mounted it anyway. It looks ok for missing so much hair. You need to go through the taxidermist right of passage and learn about slip. You can't avoid it. Sometimes the cape is doomed before it gets to you. The important thing to do is follow the steps the best you can and don't worry about it. Not every cape is going to slip. It's all in how you handle the thing from the start. Some spots will show up while mounting. And all hair will pull out when the cape is wet, so you have to handle the cape gentle like when it is in the wet condition. When doing the final face cleaning and fleshing, don't over stretch the nostrils and eyes, you will see slip in these areas if you handle it too much. Watch the thin skin behind the ears when inserting ear liners; you can easily cause a slip spot by pushing and pulling on the skin when it is wet. Knock on wood; I haven't had any slip in a long time. Slip is no big deal when you understand how to avoid it. Just don't freak when it show up, the world still turns around the sun, and this too shall pass. Have some extra capes on hand.
And the Stop Rot is a good thing.


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