Sunday morning questions(SMQ's) part 49
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Rick Krane
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« on: January 28, 2007, 02:10:51 PM »

Week 49

Good Sunday to you all! I know this Sundays SMQs are a bit late I have been needing to spend some time with family late more than ever so I apologies and thank you for the emails reminding me.

I want to put a real big thank you out there for all of the folks over the past year that have taken the time to participate and to read the SMQs! Your knowledge and contribution have been out standing to so many! There will be 3 more entries to the SMQs so I hope to see you here for the last 3.

I sure hope this week's contribution of fish food for thought shares some entertainment and knowledge for you.

I thank you and WASCO for letting me share in my passion "FISH! As long as you keep answering the questions, I will keep writing them.

So with out further ado! Lets Get the morning stared to a new week with some fish taxidermy talk! The good people at WASCO give us the free opportunity here to share information so we can be better-informed taxidermist! So in the spirit of WASCO generosity we share freely with each other!
 
Answer what you can!


1. What was best advice you ever got or could ever give for some one going in to taxidermy?

2. Would you ever repaint some ones elses work? If no why?

3. Have you ever competed in a taxidermy competition?

4. What do you want to get out of a competition or what would you expect to get from your experience?

5. Do you find Judging to be consistent from show to show or year to year?

6. What are the important aspects to doing a good competition fish? What are some of the important things you go over?

7. What are your profit margins on your fish work? Bases on time, material, labor, and overhead? 10%, 20%, 30% etc?

8. How much do you ask for regarding a down payment? 30%, 40%, 50% etcWhy?

9. What do you or would you do for unclaimed work?

Bonus Question
10. Here is a great question for our Good Friend Paul B in MI. What is a kunja and where is it located?

From beginners to the seasoned pro's every one contributes and all benefit from your great experiences!

My Best and have fun with this!

Rick Krane
Anglers Artistry
312 Chesterfield Rd
Hinsdale, NH 03451
603.336.7296
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Old Fart
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« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2007, 03:13:56 PM »

1. Learn your anatomy. AND for fish painting, buy the best airbrush that you can afford.

2. Sure, why not? I've repainted a lot of fish over the years, most were faded and needed it anyway.

3. Yes, since 1982.

4. I enter to make sure that my work is keeping pace with the newer techniques. With fish I haven't entered anything but customer work for years. I really don't have any desire to do a "stinkin" fish for myself, cause I don't get paid for that work! LOL

5. Not necessarily. But then you are really just asking for a judge's opinion, based on his(or her) knowledge and experience. That will vary from judge to judge.

6. Proper anatomy, attention to craftsmanship details and a good paint job.

7. Since fish tend to be a bit lower in general overhead a 30% profit is  what I expect, based on my pricing system.

8. 25%- 50% depending on th size of the fish. I've never been stuck with a "big" fish. On extremely small fish I treat them like waterfowl, 100% deposit!

9. I have an interior decorator that will take anything and everything that isn't claimed, at my price! 

10. A WHAT?
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Chad See
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« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2007, 03:25:55 PM »

1. What was best advice you ever got or could ever give for some one going in to taxidermy?

1.  Never got a lot of good advice before I started this, but the best I can give is to find a good person to learn from, use LOTS of reference, and do every mount as if it were for yourself.  

2. Would you ever repaint some ones elses work? If no why?

2. I would repaint someone elses work. If the anatomy is poor, but the paint job is great, it is not a great mount.  I would probably insist on fixing any anatomy problems if there were any and that is the only way I would do it.  

3. Have you ever competed in a taxidermy competition?

3.  Yes

4. What do you want to get out of a competition or what would you expect to get from your experience?

4.  I go to learn.  If I can pick up one thing from a judge, a member, or a seminar, then the experience was worth while.  It is not always about ribbons and trophies.  They are nice, but it is great to learn what I am doing wrong and what I can do to fix or improve my mistakes.  

5. Do you find Judging to be consistent from show to show or year to year?

5.  Not always.  Differnt people look for different things.  Everyone interprets their reference different, so no one could really judge exactly the same.  For the most part, judging is similar though.
6. What are the important aspects to doing a good competition fish? What are some of the important things you go over?

6.  For me, a fish has to have good epoxy work.  No lumps, bumps or odd looking areas...(although I have competed with some that didnt meet that criteria). The anatomy must be accurate, the paint must be realistic and not look "painted."  I also like my fish to have a good artistic flow.  


7. What are your profit margins on your fish work? Bases on time, material, labor, and overhead? 10%, 20%, 30% etc?  

7. I pay myself $15 an hour, then mark everything up 10%.

8. How much do you ask for regarding a down payment? 30%, 40%, 50% etcWhy?

8. I always ask for half down.  This ususally more than covers materials and if someone can come up with half down the other half usually isnt as hard to collect.  

9. What do you or would you do for unclaimed work?

9.  It depends on the mount.  If it is something I really like, I may keep it.  If I need the cash, I sell it.  Never had to do either and hope I never do, but that would be the case.  

Bonus Question
10. Here is a great question for our Good Friend Paul B in MI. What is a kunja and where is it located?

10.  Had to google that one.  Came up with "The word "KUNJA" is considered to be a very high class word in the Korean language. According to the Korean-English dictionary, Kunja is "a man of virtue, a true gentleman; a wise man." Kunja is a person who is a model of virtue, a person with wisdom, courage, and understanding of natural laws with a deep appreciation of humanity."

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Mark V.
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« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2007, 04:22:42 PM »

1. What was best advice you ever got or could ever give for some one going in to taxidermy? I would say learn buisness as well as technique and if you go into it as a living treat it like a buisness.

2. Would you ever repaint some ones elses work? If no why? Absolutely. We repaint fish for people everyday its good extra income.

3. Have you ever competed in a taxidermy competition? Yes

4. What do you want to get out of a competition or what would you expect to get from your experience? Use it as a learning experience and a way to learn new techniques.

5. Do you find Judging to be consistent from show to show or year to year? Haven't competed in years so wouldn't know.

6. What are the important aspects to doing a good competition fish? What are some of the important things you go over? N/A

7. What are your profit margins on your fish work? Bases on time, material, labor, and overhead? 10%, 20%, 30% etc?
Fish is good income I would say 30-40%
8. How much do you ask for regarding a down payment? 30%, 40%, 50% etcWhy? 40-50 % down or work is not started.

9. What do you or would you do for unclaimed work? Some mounts we keep others will be sold on Ebay.

Bonus Question
10. Here is a great question for our Good Friend Paul B in MI. What is a kunja and where is it located?
From beginners to the seasoned pro's every one contributes and all benefit from your great experiences!

My Best and have fun with this!

Rick Krane
Anglers Artistry
312 Chesterfield Rd
Hinsdale, NH 03451
603.336.7296
 
 
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My Best!
Rick Krane
Anglers Artistry
312 Chesterfield Rd
Hinsdale NH 03451
603-336-7296
Call for One on One classes! Available to all levels of interest!
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Monty Artrip
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« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2007, 05:51:18 PM »


1. What was best advice you ever got or could ever give for some one going in to taxidermy? Be sure you are willing and can spare the extra time. If it takes all your spare time away from the people you love, maybe consider doing it as a hobby only. Also, don't expect to get rich and start out at the top of the game right away.

2. Would you ever repaint some ones elses work? If no why? Yes, I have on several occasions.

3. Have you ever competed in a taxidermy competition? yes

4. What do you want to get out of a competition or what would you expect to get from your experience? Knowledge and friendships with people with like interests.

5. Do you find Judging to be consistent from show to show or year to year? No, not at all. I have had fish get a second or third and take them to a different show and get a blue. I even did this once going from a state show to the IGT. Opinions are like a**holes, and every judge has one. The point is, if you are open minded you will learn something from every one of them. I have learned the most from judges that have hammered me by picking their brain and finding out why.

6. What are the important aspects to doing a good competition fish? What are some of the important things you go over? I used to actually think the paint job. Though important, good anatomy and symetry are the most important to me.

7. What are your profit margins on your fish work? Bases on time, material, labor, and overhead? 10%, 20%, 30% etc? I hate to say that I have not actually figured this exactly. I know when the taxes are done, my expenses are about 40 %. I also have a new shop included in that figure though. 

8. How much do you ask for regarding a down payment? 30%, 40%, 50% etcWhy? 50%. That is enough to cover materials easily and make it easy to recoup the balance if they would default.

9. What do you or would you do for unclaimed work? If it is not a fish I need for my showroom, I would try to sell it. Bad thing is Ebay shoppers want you to practically give it to them.

Bonus Question
10. Here is a great question for our Good Friend Paul B in MI. What is a kunja and where is it located? I am not Paul, but I am betting it is something you can order in a Japenese steak house.
From beginners to the seasoned pro's every one contributes and all benefit from your great experiences!
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John C
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« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2007, 06:32:49 PM »

1. What was best advice you ever got or could ever give for some one going in to taxidermy?

Learn to read  reference photos, look close up at the details, go to shows take the hits and learn from the mistakes.

2. Would you ever repaint some ones else’s work? If no why?

Yes all the time, seems like there  is a call for it and I like painting.

3. Have you ever competed in a taxidermy competition?

Yes, I think they can help if you go in to learn and the show is an honest one. I have judged alot of shows over the years and find  you hit a barrier where some just don't want to admit they need improvement.

Comps are a way of staying tuned up.

4. What do you want to get out of a competition or what would you expect to get from your experience?

You will get out of it what you put into it. Go to learn go with an open mind. I have learned more hanging out in the halls talking with other taxis than in the seminars.

5. Do you find Judging to be consistent from show to show or year to year?

Never the same, one show you can cleanup in and the other you walk away disappointed. When the awrads are from a higher show, you know the lower show just was not right. I know many judges who will not judge certain state shows because the competition chairman has changed the judges scores.

Hey no ribbon is worth that!!!  Matter of fact that is one thing that will bring a association down and down fast!!!

6. What are the important aspects to doing a good competition fish? What are some of the important things you go over?

Anatomy and realistic paint.

7. What are your profit margins on your fish work? Bases on time, material, labor, and overhead? 10%, 20%, 30% etc?

Depedns on the fish, sometimes I make money other times I should be paid hourly.

8. How much do you ask for regarding a down payment? 30%, 40%, 50% etc…Why?
50%

9. What do you or would you do for unclaimed work? Dont have unclaimed work.

Bonus Question
10. Here is a great question for our Good Friend Paul B in MI. What is a kunja and where is it located?

Never heard of it other than a style of martial arts and an african village,
From beginners to the seasoned pro's every one contributes and all benefit from your great experiences!
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joeym
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« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2007, 06:51:42 PM »

1. What was best advice you ever got or could ever give for some one going in to taxidermy?  Pay close attention to detail

2. Would you ever repaint some ones elses work? If no why?  Yes, I do all the time...the most recent was a 36 yr old bass originally mounted by Touchstone Taxidermy in Bossier City, LA

3. Have you ever competed in a taxidermy competition? No

4. What do you want to get out of a competition or what would you expect to get from your experience? I plan to compete, and I really would like to hear what the judges say I need to do to be better.

5. Do you find Judging to be consistent from show to show or year to year? N/A

6. What are the important aspects to doing a good competition fish? What are some of the important things you go over? Most competition pieces I have seen are awesome.  I would love to be at that level in quality.

7. What are your profit margins on your fish work? Bases on time, material, labor, and overhead? 10%, 20%, 30% etc?  Fish are good money-makers, especially LM Bass.  About 15% in direct costs, so there is plenty of margin for profit

8. How much do you ask for regarding a down payment? 30%, 40%, 50% etcWhy?  50%  Because that is a fair deposit for both parties.

9. What do you or would you do for unclaimed work?  Sell it ASAP or use for advertising in sporting good stores

Bonus Question
10. Here is a great question for our Good Friend Paul B in MI. What is a kunja and where is it located?  Never heard of that one.


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Joey Murphey, Taxidermist    Chunky, Mississippi    www.mstaxidermist.com     http://wokk.co
Frank E. Kotula
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« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2007, 06:40:00 AM »

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 49

Good Sunday to you all! I know this Sundays SMQs are a bit late I have been needing to spend some time with family late more than ever so I apologies and thank you for the emails reminding me.

I want to put a real big thank you out there for all of the folks over the past year that have taken the time to participate and to read the SMQs! Your knowledge and contribution have been out standing to so many! There will be 3 more entries to the SMQs so I hope to see you here for the last 3.

I sure hope this week's contribution of fish food for thought shares some entertainment and knowledge for you.

I thank you and WASCO for letting me share in my passion "FISH! As long as you keep answering the questions, I will keep writing them.

So with out further ado! Lets Get the morning stared to a new week with some fish taxidermy talk! The good people at WASCO give us the free opportunity here to share information so we can be better-informed taxidermist! So in the spirit of WASCO generosity we share freely with each other!
 
Answer what you can!
No problem sir Rick, I'm a day late for while your with your great family I was instructing. So forgive me for a day late.


1. What was best advice you ever got or could ever give for some one going in to taxidermy? I will say this, it will take a lot of your time away from your family and life if you want a serious business.

2. Would you ever repaint some ones else's work? If no why?
Yes I have and in reality I still hated it. Without your work behind the product it's like trying to paint a piece of crap and make it good.

3. Have you ever competed in a taxidermy competition? Yes

4. What do you want to get out of a competition or what would you expect to get from your experience?
I look for the fun of it meeting everybody and new friends.

5. Do you find Judging to be consistent from show to show or year to year?  That's tough for each judge has there own likes and dislikes. It's a game and you need to please the judge. It makes things very interesting out there. The hard part is learning to play LOL.

6. What are the important aspects to doing a good competition fish? anatomy, fin placement, what is the fish doing. paint job, then base work. This can hurt you very much. If the judges don't understand a base if can cost you to loose.

What are some of the important things you go over? For me I care about the fish and judge only the fish unless I'm asked to judge the base with it. I like to go over each fish with the person and explain some of what is the major mistakes it has. There is no since in trying to explain to the person every bit of what's wrong with a fish for many of them can be and are upset with the ribbon. We all expect a blue for it's our best work. So we have to deal with folks who are upset and if you go and rip them apart they may never come back to compete. So I like to write what is wrong and then go over and highlight what they need to do to make themselves understand if you just change these few things you can then overcome the little problems. Once you generally take care of the big problems the little usually go with it for they can see this in there mount.

7. What are your profit margins on your fish work? Bases on time, material, labor, and overhead? 10%, 20%, 30% etc? Generally it's around 30% to 40 % on the fish.

8. How much do you ask for regarding a down payment? 30%, 40%, 50% etcWhy?  20% and no real real why. It's what I ask for.

9. What do you or would you do for unclaimed work? Yo have to follow your laws in your state on unclaimed or abandoned property.

Bonus Question
10. Here is a great question for our Good Friend Paul B in MI. What is a kunja and where is it located?
From beginners to the seasoned pro's every one contributes and all benefit from your great experiences!
Ditto on what Chad had said: Had to google that one.  Came up with "The word "KUNJA" is considered to be a very high class word in the Korean language. According to the Korean-English dictionary, Kunja is "a man of virtue, a true gentleman; a wise man." Kunja is a person who is a model of virtue, a person with wisdom, courage, and understanding of natural laws with a deep appreciation of humanity."
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Frank E. Kotula
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Pescado
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« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2007, 09:01:09 AM »

    Well maybe I should change my moniker to "Kunja" , lol. Seriously though, I came across a photo of a fish, or variation of a fish I have never seen. It was a small photo in a magazine. I asked around and got a couple "could be's" and kinda left it at that. I was at a trade show this weekend and had a replica of a brook trout I cast at my booth and a fellow Michigander and outfitter stopped by to chat . He noticed the fish and when I told him it was a replica, he said he had caught a few fish in his area that he wanted copies of. His area for the last 16 years has been Russia, and when he explained the one fish, which he called a "kunja" ( not sure of the spelling here could be coonja), I asked for a description. The fish he explained was, or sounded just like the fish in the photo. I asked if he had any good photos and he said no, but did have video. I showed him the magazine photo, and he said that was the fish. He called it an Arctic Spotted Char. I guess until I find out otherwise, that's what I'll call it.

  Any input or photos would be great. The picture is blown up from a very small magazine print.


* koonja.jpg (89.07 kB, 576x204 - viewed 760 times.)
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Paul Borkowski
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Agawa Canyon Outfitters, LTD.
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« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2007, 10:12:29 AM »

Hey Paul,
I just did a quick search and came up with a few things.
Do you think it could be a "Kundza" ?


"Kundza." White spotted char


White-spotted char, Salvelinus leucomaenis Passing species. Occurs in Primorye rivers and coastal seawaters along the entire coastline, but preferentially in northern areas. Its range includes the basins of Japan and Okhotsk Seas, and the western part of Bering Sea. Quite a large fish, attaining in Primorye 99 cm in length and 11 kg in weight. Lives for up to nine years. Specimens of different size and age occur in catches, most frequently 32-76 cm long, weighing from 0.3 to 5.7 kg at the age of two to four. Attains sexual maturity in the third-fourth year of life when 23-40 cm long. Enters Primorye to spawn in late June-early August. Spawns in September. Spawns similarly to Pacific salmon to bury its roe. In addition to passing males, spawning also involves dwarf males. After spawning, the fish stay in the river till spring to then roll into the sea. When it fattens in the sea, the char does not perform lengthy migrations to keep close to near-estuary river sites or not far from the coast. In summer, it actively feeds on smelt, sand eels, gobies and Pacific salmon young when they roll into the sea. In some cases, in accumulating near spawning river estuaries, the char would eat a considerable amount of rolling keta and gorbuscha young. The char would return to rivers to hibernate. The young would spend from two to four years in the river to subsequently start rolling into the sea to fatten in summer. While they stay in the river, the young would feed on the larvae of caddis flies and other insects. The char is a valuable food species and the object of local fishery and amateur fishing.

source: www.fishingnorth.com/Kundza.htm





* Kamchatka05%20123.jpg (31.86 kB, 800x292 - viewed 819 times.)

* stshipley1adultchar.jpg (43.41 kB, 800x352 - viewed 800 times.)
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Pescado
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« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2007, 10:37:19 AM »

AA,
        That sure looks like it and "Kundza" sure sounds like it. It's has all the characteristics of the fish in the magazine photo, except the darker color, which we all know can vary greatly.  Thanks a bunch for the research job! I think I'm going to make one.

  Paul B
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Paul Borkowski
Blue Ribbon Taxidermy & Supply
Agawa Canyon Outfitters, LTD.
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« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2007, 10:42:49 AM »

Also I found this one that I believe is the same fish or a very close realative
The Japanese call it:
Amemasu (Salvelinus leucomaenis)

 


* amemasu.JPG (27.35 kB, 800x287 - viewed 771 times.)

* amemasu3.JPG (31.99 kB, 800x305 - viewed 796 times.)
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