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Pressure Washer Fleshing - my method

Discussion in 'Tanning' started by GravityKills, Sep 17, 2008.

  1. Ok, guys. It is hard to take turtorial pictures of this when you are the one doing it, but I managed to dry off my camera phone each time. ;D
    So, Since several people have asked or inquired on perssuer washer fleshing, I fleshed out a cape last night. Lets see how long it take to d this, my pictures are always too big and need to be resized as I go along, so bear with me....

    This is the thing to be fleshed. A 4-5 year old large pygmy goat buck that will soon be a black unicorn. This thing SMELLED. Yuck. YUCK! Rivaled any Corsican ram I have worked with. Thick, tough sucker..... I washed his hair side with some degreaser/deoderizer to start with....
     
  2. Here is my washer. Actually, it is my fathers. I use a stall mat from my horses, smooth side up, and flat on the ground. No fancy angles board or nothing, it is not needed. I have an area where the bits can fly, so I set up nothing behind it. Bits and small chunks dry up and go away by the next day. It is messy, so if you dont have an area where you can lets stuff fly away, just do it against a wall and scoop up the yucky stuff when your done. I do used a small low stol to sit on, a small plastic step stool. Hives me the perfect angle, and is relaxing.
     

  3. Ok, time to get wet. Rally. YOU WILL GET WET. Not rcomended for your people who get snow in the winter...;)
    This is the tip I use. the white one (dont know eactly what deminsions it is).
     
  4. Forget all the clamps and such, not neded. I strt off at the top of the cape (half life size in this case) by holding the nose down with my foot. Just dont hit your foot with the water, duh.....
     
  5. Most think the power washer is sooooo tough.... Wrong. I have used this method on turkeys, squirrels and even stillborn lambs and goats p to buffalo. Just a matter of how close aand how long you hold the water spray in one spot. I sit down, the water on the cape will hold it still. If it starts to slip, just put your foot on it. I hold the tip only about 2-4 inches away from the skin, and slowly push foward. The stuff peels off.

    NOW.... if you have areas of the cape where the meat has been cut off, this method is quick and easy. the water gets up under that last membrane and lifts up and rolls ff with all fat and goo attached to it, leaving the bare skin.
    Jump around, you dont eed to work in one spot....
     
  6. Careful you don't blow off a toe nail! I saw my neighbor accidently hit his foot while washing his boat and blow his big toe nail. Ouch!!!!
     
  7. Sorry, had to take a break and take in a customer deer... back to it...

    Now, on this skin, I left meat on it to show how t get it off. Since many of the skins I do this to are my own, (I skinned the animal out) I usually skin clean with no meat. But commercial taxidermists are not always that lucky.
    Before starting, you can score the meat sections with your knife or scapel. Makes it easy to spray off the meat in chunks.
    in this case, I forgot to score the meat so i did it with the water spray.

    Look close, and you will see that rumor of cutting the skin with the spray debunked. My spray tip is about 1 inch awa from the meat/skin. And in some cases, i touch the tip to te meat. I slowly move the tip sideways as I see white under the meat.....
     
  8. Niiiccceee.....
    Clean, white, no fleshing marks, nothing.
    For you who use DP or Krowtann... this is IT! Turn, detail the face, and done. I never have had to shave or anything, and I get major stretch since the power washer did it for me.... ;)
     
  9. oudrdave

    oudrdave New Member

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    Wow. I would have never guessed! Do you have any problems with hair slippage? Just wondering :)
     
  10. Wow great job, you did a great job showing the usage of the preasure washer. Bravo ;D
     
  11. James Dalueg

    James Dalueg New Member

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    Great Post. Thats what I needed to see. I believe I'll be shopping for a pressure washer tommorrow. The saving in time alone will make it pay for itself.
     
  12. You'll need at least 3000 psi for deer and larger, heavier hides. Get a pressure washer that has an adjustable pressure knob so that you can tone it down for smaller capes and a rotating head helps.
     
  13. SagelyTaxidermists

    SagelyTaxidermists New Member

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    ;D Great job!
     
  14. SevenMaryThree

    SevenMaryThree New Member

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    If you don't have a pressure washer (or the time & space to clean up the goo), you can also take your stuff to the quarter car wash. They usually have enough oomph to do what you need, and they have wall clamps there for the floor mats that work perfect.

    I sometimes do my turtle shells there. ; )
     
  15. Tilapalewis

    Tilapalewis New Member

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    AR.
    Wow!! Thank you for doing this. I just purchased a power washer for my furs.
     
  16. Ok, I'm back...;)

    Slippage? No. Never. The nice thing about this method, I freeze the whole cape until I am ready to mount (usually). The day before, I pressure wash. I hang it up to drain. Check this out,... I have a cheap round plastic table from Walmart, ya know, the kind that match the $5.99 cheap chairs? I lye it on its side, drape the skin over it so that the skin is wet and stretched out over the slick wet plastic table. The hair side will dry nearly completely, and the skin side will still be cmpletely wet against the table. Put the table upright, put my DP on the skin side, roll up and put in an airtight bag. In the fridge over night. Prep my form, take out the cape. I shake off the DP, and then I have a big plastic tub with some corn grit for tumbling and more DP. I manually toss the skn around in it, rubbing the mixture into the hair and skin, fluffing it out, repeat. Soon, you will have a cape that is moist slightly on the skin side and dry and fluffy on the hair side. I shake the crap out of it for a while, getting as much stuff off as possible. Now I am ready to mount. Still just as stretchy as it was from the start. Dry enough to adhere real well with whatever paste you use. Ears ready for liners or bondo, and lip and eye skin still very pliable for tucking.

    Of course, I have no tumbler, so I do it by hand. I also dont do 300 der a year, so for my smaller scale production, this is great for the one at a time mounting. I can flesh and mount all in one weekend.

    I have even pickled and tanned capes after this, with excellent results. No salting, no need, all the stuff is already off the skin. And again, I have never had a need to shave down the skin.

    I have bought forms that were the measurement of the animal, and have even had to fill in with clay r paste because I have had no problem with shrinkage. But, I must say, I have not mounted a deer like this yet using DP. I have with Krowtann, Liqua Tan and a Rnachers Tanning Kit. I wll be mouting a deer this way next weekend.
     
  17. jbnf

    jbnf New Member

    Great tutorial!! Thank you very much for showing this. I have read about it quite a bit on here but to see it done in pictures is awesome.

    Thanks again for taking the time to show us how its done.
     
  18. You are more than welcome. The great thing about this is you can use the pressure washer for many other things, non-taxidermy related. Cant wash your house siding with a $500 fleshing machine... ;D;D;D
     
  19. Thanks Gravity. Getting ready to do my first deer with this method. Did a bear this summer, had it elevated on a board and ended up transferring the fat from the hide to me!
     
  20. Your gonna get bits. Yucky. But after the emu I did, NOTHING can comapare to the flying yucky bits. I WORE that emu. With mammals, I would get the occasional bit or chunk, but mostly just wet. Sometimes you will hit a strong pocket made by the membrane on the finallayer, and the water will spray directly back in your face. YUCK. No bits, but the thought is nasty.... But get used to it... Leaving it flat on the ground is much better. Like I said, a low, small stool puts you at just the right angle. Trying to bend over or squat down will give you sore arms and a back ache. Trust me on that one. Once I discovered the stool, it became an easy, but wet, experience.