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whitening a dall sheep

Discussion in 'Tutorials' started by ryan rhodes, Feb 1, 2009.

  1. ryan rhodes

    ryan rhodes Active Member

    Well, this is my first ever dall sheep. Maybe i'm not qualified to do this :D ;D ;). I did as much research as possible, and spoke with several people who do plenty of sheep. This is what I came up with...

    1. first thing to do is prefit your cape. Fit is good, next set the horns and completely prep hide, thin eyes, nose, lips, and all that good stuff. Sew up any holes and just make sure you're ready to go!

    Here's the hide before any whitening: Both shoulders are very yellow and have blood stains as well. Sorry the pics aren't great, but you can see the difference in the end.

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    2. Ingredients... My sister works at a hair salon so I told here what I needed based on what everyone else said I needed. 40 volume peroxide and basic white, a plastic mixing bowl, a brush, thick rubber gloves, and a mask. This crap stinks, glad I don't go to a hair salon ;) All this stuff cost me $26 dollars. That may have something to do with a discount, not sure. Never looked in the catalogs ;D

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    3. Mix ingredients. I put about 7 scoops of basic white in bowl, and added peroxide till it mixed up to a shaving creme consistency. The basic white powder is very light and fluffy, mix gently at first!

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    4. Apply mixture to hair with brush. I brushed it on with the direction of the hair first, with a liberal coat. Nest I back brushed it a bit to get some of the underlying stains. Don't work it all the way down to the skin, you don't want it to burn the roots. The hair is hollow and brittle to begin with.

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    Now, you can basically watch your hide start to whiten. Don't leave it on too long, it can burn the hair! I left it on for about 20-25 minutes.

    5. Rinse and wash and condition. Remember, wear gloves! It will burn your skin! I rinsed it several times in cold water till all of the bleach appeared to be gone. If your water isn't clear, do it again! Then I washed and conditioned the hide. I was told conditioning was necessary to soften the hair and it will help reduce brittleness. Again, rinse until water is clear or you'll end up with a residue on the hair.

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    6. Ring out as much water a possible and throw it in the washer on the spin cycle...

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    7. Finished product! Now, it's not 100% white, not do I want it to be. There are 1 or 2 spots that are a little stained still and I will re-do those. However, I don't want a pure white dall mount as I don't think that is natural on a wild dall sheep. If you are not happy with the first results, you can do it again from what I've been told. Hopefully in the first and last pics you can see a dramatic difference in the amount of yellow on the hide. Note: be careful not to get bleach on the eye-lids and lips and nose, it can bleach the dark spots and will make finishing a little more diffucult. Hope this helps any first timers. I'm sure this method would work just as well on mountain goats and the like. Good luck and have fun. I'll post pics of him when he's done!

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  2. Kevin Halle

    Kevin Halle Well-Known Member

    Looks real good. I'm getting ready to do the same exact thing. I'll post pics when it's done.
     

  3. i do it the same way, except i use 30 volume peroxide and i leave mine on for 45 minutes then wash.. :)
     
  4. Kevin Halle

    Kevin Halle Well-Known Member

    Don't you have a problem with the hairs breaking after 45 minutes or is it because you are using 30%
     
  5. ryan rhodes

    ryan rhodes Active Member

    I did a lot of research on this, I have breakthrough issues 13-16, there's a 3 part series on prepping and mounting a dall sheep by robert holhauser. He mounts the sheep first, then rubs on his bleech and lets it sit over night and vacuums it off the next day. IT may not be the exact same product. My buddy just did one and he left his on for 45 minutes and it was 40 volume and it was fine. I just don't want a pure white sheep. Keep your eye on it and use your judgement.
     
  6. ryan rhodes

    ryan rhodes Active Member

    Here he is all done...

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  7. 2wbdft

    2wbdft Member

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    Beautie! thanks for the trouble of posting this. i assume this same technique will work for an Antelope. I have a few of them to do in the next little while and they all have some sort of blood satin in the throat patch areas.

    Thanks again,
    John
     
  8. James Marsico

    James Marsico Well-Known Member

    If you skipped using the Instant normalizing cream step as you did you WILL have brittle hair over time. This step is very important and must not be skipped. 40% is also a way to strong a bleach in my opinion. 20 or 30% at most is best. Believe me I have mounted, guessing, well over a hundred dall rams in the past 35 plus year as a full time taxidermist and I worked 5+ years in a few of the very best Alaskan studios. I recently completed this 40" Alaskan Dall ram for a Dallas Texas client. It was shot in the neck and a bloody mess. Ryan, otherwise good job and it looks like you did a very nice mount.
     
  9. ryan rhodes

    ryan rhodes Active Member

    Thanks for the compliment james, that puts me at ease coming from you! Thanks for adding the normalizing cream comment, I hadn't heard that before, at least I don't think I did. I'll be sure to stroe that in the memory bank for the next one. Thanks, ryan