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how to tan a beaver tail

Discussion in 'Tanning' started by coop1212, Mar 7, 2009.

  1. coop1212

    coop1212 Active Member

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    i want to tan a beaver tail. i need to make it into soft workable leather. how?
     
  2. muscle20

    muscle20 New Member

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    I think the skinning of that tail is going to be the biggest problem!!!!!!!!LoL
     

  3. stuffenstuff

    stuffenstuff Member

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    that would be one chunk of cartilage, wouldn't it? how could a tan adhere ?
     
  4. coop1212

    coop1212 Active Member

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    tail is skinned out . all fat is gone.i want to use it to make a knife shealth for a knife that im making.i just need it to be soft and workable leather to make shealth for it. anybody know how
     
  5. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Tanning one is not the problem and if you have is skinned and COMPLETELY fleshed out to the leathery skin, simply salt it and tan it as you would any other hide. I do a few for the local nature centers around here and they want the natural tail left on. I send them to Carolina fleshed and salted and they come back just fine.
     
  6. stuffenstuff

    stuffenstuff Member

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    I have to try that? I never skinned one out...I make a mold of them and cast them. Thanks George :)
     
  7. huntersridge

    huntersridge New Member

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  8. Felpy

    Felpy New Member

    Have played with this a bit and have not had a great deal of success. I did find that if you want to make leather you will have to remove the scales. I tried with scales on and when I went to break/soften it the scales began to work lose from the leather. You can remove the scales the same way you remove hair from a deer hide. Soak in lime or place skinned/fleshed tail in a plastic bag for a couple of days and then gently scrap with fleshing knife. You will still end up with the scale pattern in the leather. The hard part is getting the leather to be soft. I been able to work it by hand and come up with a plyable leather but nothing that is soft, supple and commercially viable to produce.
     
  9. jasonb

    jasonb I think I'll keep her

    I have done it once when I was a younger taxidermist before I realized tanning was best left to the professionals, and if I recall it was a pain in the rear.
     
  10. stuffenstuff

    stuffenstuff Member

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    yea that's what I thought, think I will stick with mold and cast...:)
     
  11. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Felby, at the risk of sounding rude (now that's going to shock somebody) what the hell are you talking about with "scales". We're talking about a BEAVER not a crappie or a bass. I'd done dozens of beavers and I don't recall EVER seeing a scale on one. You're talking about removing the epidural layer of SKIN. The beavers I got back form Carolina had the tails (and "scales" I suppose as there was still hair on the tail) that were soft. They weren't glove leather soft, but still soft tanned leather. If you clean that tail properly and shave it like you would a weasel or a mink, the tail will be intact and soft when it gets back.