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HEY LORD RUSTY!!!!

Discussion in 'Habitat and Exhibit' started by Bobbi Meyer, Apr 7, 2009.

  1. Bobbi Meyer

    Bobbi Meyer I luv to ride my tricycle, I luv to ride my trike

    how many pounds of coffee grounds should I collect for the secret earth.....?
    this is a 1 gallon ice cream container!!! LOL
     
  2. Critter

    Critter New Member

    Thats not wimpy decaff is it??/ :D
     

  3. Bobbi Meyer

    Bobbi Meyer I luv to ride my tricycle, I luv to ride my trike

    no....full flavor, pencil shavings state coffee!!!!
    NASTY CRAP
     
  4. bone_painter

    bone_painter "Your life is yours alone. Rise up and live it."

    ;D ;D I just made my first habitat base ever & I tried the "secret earth", I really love how it turned out!
     
  5. Bobbi Meyer

    Bobbi Meyer I luv to ride my tricycle, I luv to ride my trike

    bone painter, did you end up using very much of the coffee grounds?
     
  6. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,569
    66
    Ohio
    Hey Bobbi,

    You only need to mix up enough to cover the surface, remember? The "ground" was built up using colored urethane foam, I used a small can to mix the grounds in ... a Campbells' soup can would work. The base in my "John Tuturiol" was 20" x 24". After applying to "secret earth" mix, you spread it around, then sprinkle on some dry to the surface to "dull" it, along with your leaf litter, then if you like, hit it with a hair dryer or heat gun. If using a heat gun, be careful of how long you apply the heat and to move it about.

    Lastly, be certain to dry all those coffee grounds, or the moisture will never leave them before they turn moldy! That pile there looks a little clumpy with moisture. Put paper towel on a baking sheet or cookie sheet, spread an even layer of grounds, and pop it in the oven set at about 200-degrees for a few hours. The aroma will drive you nutz! :D

    And remember, you can mix the grounds with leaf litter and apply this dry mix to a base that has either catalyzed polyester resin painted on it, or slightly thinned white glue (Elmer's, etc.) Sprinkle it on, tamp it down slightly, let it set. Mix about a 50%/50% water/white glue, pour into a spray bottle, spray glue on the base, and add more dry ground cover mix. Repeat until you get the desired look. Add twigs, leaves, etc, secure with spray glue, have fun!

    John.
     
  7. Bobbi Meyer

    Bobbi Meyer I luv to ride my tricycle, I luv to ride my trike

    I have it all spread out on some newspapers out in the shop now to dry....I'm in no hurry to use it, so it can sit for a while....it's always about 70 degrees in my shop, so if it doesn't dry out better, I'll pop it in the oven some more.
     
  8. bill@hogheaven

    [email protected] New Member

    8,017
    3
    You know what looks even more realistic?.......dirt.
     
  9. But that's no secret, Bill.
     
  10. Bobbi Meyer

    Bobbi Meyer I luv to ride my tricycle, I luv to ride my trike

    hows that base mix from WASCO look?
     
  11. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,569
    66
    Ohio
    Bobbi, the grounds will not dry properly unless they are in a "controlled" dry heat situation ... an oven. I'm telling you this from personal, and practical experience. 70-degrees may be comfortable for you -- way to warm for me by the way -- it is not nearly hot enough to effectively dry the grounds. If you don't want to head the advice then just do what you want. But I have no answers on how to "fix" grounds dried any other way.

    Any moisture ... the most incremental bit of moisture ... will affect the setting of the polyester resin if you choose that route. It will not set properly in the white glue medium either. When they are oven cured, the grounds become more powder-like ... looking more like natural, rich soil. Oven drying also lessens the coffee aroma ... nearly kills it from the grounds. You wouldn't expect to cure greenware without "kiln drying" now would you? Well, oven drying -- curing -- is the way to completely dry the used coffee grounds.

    Bill, the problem with using your answer -- "dirt" -- is that it contains living organisms. I don't know about you, but I'd rather my oven and my house smell like coffee than dirt! If you don't kill the organisms they will eventually affect the whole mount.

    Now, when I collected a load of red earth from Georgia, for use in my African mounts, I did in fact cure the dirt in our oven. The biggest surprise was at how nice the house smelled! Why? There is a ton of pine litter in the soil from where I collected it. Around the Monroe, GA area ... northern Georgia, really.

    I have -- in the past -- dried regular, good ol' dirt, in an oven, and the stink was nasty! I guess it's what it would smell like to be buried alive! So I won't ever be drying dirt in an oven again! No thanks ... never again!

    That's why I tinkered with various "artificial" soils, and stumbled upon the dried coffee grounds ... oven dried coffee grounds to be specific.

    Take it for what it's worth. I've been at this a lot longer than many of you here, and this "discovery" -- if you want to call it that -- has worked well for me and has held true for many years. I guess you could say it was "Ground(s) Breaking!" ;)

    Take care,
    John.
     
  12. bill@hogheaven

    [email protected] New Member

    8,017
    3
    I will stick with dirt, been working just fine for many many years.
     
  13. Bobbi Meyer

    Bobbi Meyer I luv to ride my tricycle, I luv to ride my trike

    I'll dry em out in the oven....I just want them to be drier than they were....
    I tried them right after I brought em home, without really letting them dry some and it took like 2 hours at 200 degrees to finally dry out.
    with them being mostly dry, it shouldn't take so long....
    and i have to wait for SWMBO to disappear for a while...she didn't like the smell last time!!!!! LOL
     
  14. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,569
    66
    Ohio
    Yes Bobbi, it takes a few hours at 200 degrees for the grounds to thoroughly dry. It's the lowest temp on most ovens, and the nice thing is it won't catch anything on fire at that temp!

    After I pull the filter and grounds from my coffee maker, I set the whole thing "standing" in a little plastic container and let them air dry for a few days in the filter. Then I empty the filter out and spread the grounds out on paper towel on the baking sheet, and pop them into the oven.

    Later in the day I take them out, and leave all to cool. Then into my plastic coffee "can" for storage. Yep ... it's labeled "Used Coffee Grounds!" That's a mistake I never want to make! ;)

    John
     
  15. rustedshut

    rustedshut New Member

    12
    0
    Hey John, I am getting ready to go to my first show in a few days and I just tried your forest floor formula for dirt. It did not turn out well. It was verrrry glossy even with acetone added. Now what I used was Bondo Fiberglass Resin and liquid hardener. was this the right stuff? I know how to use the dirt and glue but wanted something a little nicer. I just need a small piece for a jumpin Bobcat on a marble base.
     
  16. Cole

    Cole Amateur Taxidermist

    roflmao
     
  17. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,569
    66
    Ohio
    Did you sprinkle some dry grounds and leaf litter on top while it was still wet? I think that was mentioned for achieving a drier look.

    John.
     
  18. rustedshut

    rustedshut New Member

    12
    0
    Rusty, I tried mixing it per your tutorial but it had a high gloss to it. I tried it again and added more liquid hardener and acetone to no avail. Then I tried it again with magic dirt over to top and patted in, bit that did not work either. What do you think I might have done wrong? I will try it again with white glue when I scrounge up some more magic dirt. I wound up using white glue and sand and pebbles. It was simple but complimented the black marble base very well. I ended up with a second place in the professional division in my first competition.