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California Academy of Science ...

Discussion in 'Lifesize Mammals' started by LordRusty, May 31, 2009.

  1. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,578
    74
    Ohio
    While these Grevy's Zebra are an astounding example of the Taxidermy skills of Mr. Frank Tose, the real draw for many museum visitors is the "moving mural"! Look closely at the faint sight of an African Elephant herd ...
    [​IMG]

    ... then click this YouTube link to see the herd "walking"! It is too cool!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-KF2UNf7hU

    Enjoy! I know I did!

    More images of Frank Tose's Grevy's Zebra:
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    John.
     
  2. Bill Yox

    Bill Yox Well-Known Member

    John, did you find him to look a bit too "domestic horse", in the whole rear leg, and sag in the upper front leg, and stance? I know theres a relate, but to me, it doesnt look wild. I dont see wild zebras but still. Its great just the same, no doubt.
     

  3. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,578
    74
    Ohio
    Well Bill,

    If you compare them to the domestic horse just below them -- my boy -- I don't see how you can say that. Also ... and this is major ... these are Grevy's Zebra, and they are unlike the more familiar plains Zebra species; the Grant's, Chapman's, Burchell's, etc. For one, Grevy's Zebra are much larger than their cousins, and in many ways resemble Wild Asses -- no jokes please -- and domestic Mules, which do resemble horses ... but the wilder, grade types. The Przewalski's Horse comes to mind ... and Grevy's Zebra are actually taller and more refined than even those wild Horses.

    From Wikipedia: "Grévy's zebra is the largest of all wild equines. It is 2.5-2.75 m (8-9 ft) from head to tail with a 38-75 cm (15-30 in) tail, and stands 1.45-1.6 m (4'7"-5'3") high at the shoulder. These zebras weigh 350-450 kg (770-990 lb). The stripes are narrow and close-set, being broader on the neck, and they extend to the hooves. The belly and the area around the base of the tail lack stripes. With all of the stripes closer together and thinner than most of the other zebras, it is easier to make a good escape and to hide from predators. The ears are very large, rounded, and conical. The head is large, long, and narrow, particularly mule-like in appearance. The mane is tall and erect; juveniles having a mane extending the length of the back. "

    Here are some photo's of Grevy's and Common Zebra for comparison.
    Grevy's stallion:
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Grevy's stallion:
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    Grevy's mare:
    [​IMG]

    Grevy's mare with foal:
    [​IMG]

    Grevy's mare walking:
    [​IMG]

    Chapman's Mare:
    [​IMG]

    Grevy's mares:
    [​IMG]

    Burchell's stallion:
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    Grevy's stallion:
    [​IMG]

    "Pissy" Grevy's stallion:
    [​IMG]

    Burchell's mare:
    [​IMG]

    Grevy's mare:
    [​IMG]

    Burchell's mare:
    [​IMG]

    Przewalski's Horse:
    [​IMG]

    Przewalski's Horse:
    [​IMG]

    Przewalski's Horse:
    [​IMG]

    Finally ...
    Rusty:
    [​IMG]

    Gilder:
    [​IMG]

    "The Boys" ... happier times:
    [​IMG]

    Whew! And I thank you!

    John.
     
  4. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,578
    74
    Ohio
    Add to all that ... there is no way in hell, I would ever question Frank Tose's expertise and abilities!

    You'll notice that the Grevy's Zebra from the American Museum of Natural History very closely resemble those at the California Academy of Sciences. That's because Frank Tose was every bit as accomplished as Robert Rockwell.

    Grevy's Zebra from the Waterhole Diorama at AMNH.
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    [​IMG]

    Hope the point has been made, my friend. ;)

    John.
     
  5. Monte

    Monte Missouri fur-Limited hair-tanning

    John , It is sad the Academy of Science no longer exist. Those beautiful back ground paintings were destroyed when the building was torn down.
    I understand the mounts are in storage. A new building is or will be constructed.
    A good friend of mine Fred Funk was a taxidermist there for 22 years. I am sure he knew Frank Tose or worked with him.
    Thanks for those photos.

    Monte
     
  6. Bill Yox

    Bill Yox Well-Known Member

    Thanks John, yes, he does very beautiful work, of course. I learned to question everyone, however. Nice follow-up pics. My eyes still have me questioning it, just the same.

    Pics like these makes you wonder how many other treasures are out there in other lesser- known museums...
     
  7. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,578
    74
    Ohio
    The museum was not entirely torn down, as much as it was added to. African Hall now has a back wall that contains live African Penguins. The museum has just reopened September 28, 2008. It has been completely redesigned. Here's their virtual tour made while construction was underway -- check it out! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYF5OAHtSjI&feature=related
    Grand Opening, Africa Hall: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7HrO-yQqD0&feature=related

    Grand Opening: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bngJi9ZKh1Q&feature=related

    It's nice to see the pieces are still there.

    Grevy's Zebra are more horse-like than any other Zebra species, but still differ substantially from their domestic cousins. These mounted representatives are spot-on to their living counterparts. If your eyes are questioning them, then it's only because you are unfamiliar with this particular species of Zebra. A little research should clear your vision for you! ;)

    Thanks to YouTube and so many people out there, you can easily see the wonders of so many more Natural History Museums. Now that we have a high speed connection, I'm really enjoying the tours!

    Dioramas from the American Museum of Natural History, New York: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34VP1yxDFQI&NR=1

    Safari in American Museum of Natural History: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DAs3yGeJyE&feature=related

    The American Museum Of Natural History: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sO8JapajPkM&feature=related

    The American Museum of Natural History: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6oTUk9pIKRQ

    The Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9EaSorWqaM

    The National Museum of Natural History - Washington DC:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbTlUKnelAo&NR=1

    The London Natural History Museum: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1mVXBvP1Xg&NR=1

    Take care all,
    John.
     
  8. hey john great info and links
    thanks for taking the time out' :)
     
  9. Russ of V.O.W.T

    Russ of V.O.W.T my Ken Edwards moment

    those tour links are awesome.

    the one thing that stands out to me on this zebra in particular is the ears look bigger, fuller, rounder , just overall larger than the other zebra species as well, as the more horselike appearance. I love looking at zebras, and the fact that there are so many different species is crazy, as when we were kids we just knew the "horses with stripes" were zebras LOL now it is fascinating to learn the differences and characteristics of what was once just known to me as a striped horse LOL
     
  10. xoedarko

    xoedarko New Member

    3
    0
    Frank Tose is my great grandpa... :D
     
  11. Nancy C

    Nancy C Well-Known Member

    I thought that horses with stripes were called duns?
    *runs away, dodging the rotten fruit*
     
  12. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,578
    74
    Ohio
    No. Dun colored Horses can have a dorsal stripe, and faint striping on their lower legs. Horses with stripes are called Zebra.

    John.
     
  13. Smeja

    Smeja New Member

    There's a man that knows his zebras
     
  14. Bill Yox

    Bill Yox Well-Known Member

    Hey this post is back. I still love the guys mounts from all those years ago. I still question something in the ones hind and midsection though. I can still enjoy the work regardless. I love seeing the old masters works that usually still surpasses most of us even now!
     
  15. Nancy C

    Nancy C Well-Known Member

    So, if a horse with stripes is a zebra, would a zebra without stripes be a horse?

    I was really saying (in a round-about way) that horses and zebras are entirely different species, even though they are both equines, and that color is not their only difference.
    The only horses that I have ever heard of which have stripes (even though they are not completely covered with them) are duns.

    The stripes seem to be pretty dominant on zebra hybrids (zorses?) especially in the same areas where duns show their stripes, but I wasn't really thinking of those when I posted. Curiously, I wonder if a zebra x dun horse hybrid might show a stronger pattern than a zebra x "regular" horse?
     
  16. This last weekend I spent a good bit of time with several Chapman's, Burchell's and a Stallions Grevy's. Any yes what JB says is very true about each.

    But then when you look at horses in general, many look nothing like the wild kinfolk and others could pass if they had stripes.

    A horse is not a horse of course, just like people have different body structures, I have four now and none look anything alike.

    The zebras I spent a lot of the weekend with are the same they dont look like others even with in the same species.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG] Grevys ear butt. Yes the Grevys has large

    [​IMG] rounder ears!

    [​IMG] Chapmans ear butt, Matty is the zebras name

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    You are welcome to use these for reference just write my name as the provider.