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Paint Colors On A Walleye

Discussion in 'Fish Taxidermy' started by jbb, Aug 3, 2009.

  1. jbb

    jbb New Member

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    Can someone please tell me what color of gold or yellow you use to bring out the gold look on the side,and the cheek of a walleye. I am a beginner, and used a bleeding candy bright yellow, and it looks to yellow.
     
  2. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    I'm sure there's a gazillion ways to do it. But, with most walleyes I put very little yellow on them. I may hit the side and cheek very lightly with Candy Golden Yellow or Amber Oxide. After that, it's pretty much all scale tipping with either Polytranspar Yellow Gold (Powder) mixed with some basecoat. Or, Jeff Lumsden's Liquid Scales/Gold will achieve similar results but it's all pre-mixed and ready to go!. I use hand brushes in the cheeks/head and do a variety of very small scale tips on up to "worm markings" (see reference). Depending on my reference and the way a particular walleye looks, I may add some sillvers (pearl) in the cheeks and also maybe some browns if need be. A lot depends on how they dry too. Most of the time I can get where I want simply with a VERY LIGHT hit of either yellow I mentioned and then the gold tips. If you sepnd 90 minutes or more tipping all those scales on a walleye you won't need too much more as you'll already have a Kick butt paint job!
     

  3. jim tucker

    jim tucker Active Member

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    The Walleye I get have a wide range of colors. The Canadian ones are dark with more yellow, Lake Erie are greener and local ones are pale.

    I use Yellow Ochre a lot to color them. Amazingly it looks good as a light mist as overal tint or if you want those popping yellow scales it does them as well.
     
  4. i use Yellow Ochre and paint each spot.. then i spray a light coat of sparkling white pearl over the yellow and it gives it a gold-yellow effect..
     

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  5. Joey Arender

    Joey Arender big mouth alert

    yellow orche is one of my favorite colors. you can do tons with it. and be in range. Not talking walleye(haven't done one yet) but in general to me anyhow
     
  6. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    Yeah, I've used Yellow Ochre too Jim. Especially on the fins.

    Color varies so much from fish to fish that it's hard to say what to use w/o a photo. Probably the most drastic differences I've seen/painted is going from the typicals I do usually to a Canadian walleye I did a few years back that was very dark and had a bright, yellow belly.

    I guess my advice would be for MOST walleyes (golden with some yellows, white to off-white belly) IF you're going to tip all those scales with gold, then I don't think much yellow paint has to go on at all prior to that. Go easy. Also, fyi, I usually add in a few tips at the end of bright yellow mixed with gold for those bright, yellowish flecks you see on walleyes in the mid to lower section. Again, just the way I usually paint them. Infinite anmout of ways to doing them...

    P.S. Looks good FishStuffer!
     
  7. jim tucker

    jim tucker Active Member

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    That's similar to how I do it. You can vary the intensity of the Yellow Ochre very easily.
     
  8. jbb

    jbb New Member

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    Fish Art and Jim tucker,: Are you using lacquer paints on your fish?
     
  9. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    Waterbased for me. Mostly Hydromist, but I have a couple of Polytranspar WB's too...
     
  10. jbb

    jbb New Member

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    Fish art & Mr. Tucker: Thanks for the advice and will give your way a try.
     
  11. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    Honestly, take the way we do things for what it's worth. Remember, there's a gazillion different ways to get to YOUR end result.The key truly is experimenting and GOOD REFERENCE!!!
     
  12. jim tucker

    jim tucker Active Member

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    I use water based of several brands. The Yellow is Hydromist.

    Like Marty I encourage you to make your own way. NOBODY has all the answers and what works for me may not work for you.

    For instance I have use a Paashe H style brush for my painting for years. I have a detail brush now(Renegade Velocity), BUT I have won plenty of awards painting with that "lowly" H.
     
  13. FishArt

    FishArt Well-Known Member

    Yeah, I too have ONLY painted with the lowly Pasche H and I have won NO awards - lol!

    One thing that should be mentioned with only using this air brush/#3/medium tip too is (and again, this goes back to finding your own style) I've found ways to do things that work for ME. I probably use hand brushes where some folks would use a higher end air brush. So, this alters the way I do things...
     
  14. jim tucker

    jim tucker Active Member

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    Hand brush, stencils, toothbrushes, q-tips whatever works. I stiill use the H for 99% of the painting but the Renegade does do some things I like.
     
  15. jbb

    jbb New Member

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    Fish art & mr tucker, I would really like to learn to paint a walleye, and a pike with lacquer paints, since thats what I started out on. I don't want to change till I figure out a good scheme, then try water base. Does Yellow ochre come in a bleeding color? I have been using the Randy Life DVD to paint my walleyes and I am not to impressed with the yellow he uses on there? Thanks for all the good info.
     
  16. jim tucker

    jim tucker Active Member

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    I don't know that answer. I avoid bleeding colors. I don't care for them.
     
  17. I mounted my first fish by following along exactly with the Randy Life DVD. I was so proud because it came out looking fairly similar to the walleye in the video. Unfortunately, his Lake Erie walleye looks a lot different than a typical Kansas walleye, or saugeye in many cases... All the fisherman who saw the mount said, "It looks too green."... They were definitely right. When I compared my mount to live local fish, I realized it was actually a pretty poor paint job. My fault... I should have paid more attention to painting MY fish instead of trying so hard to do exactly copy the DVD...

    Anyway, I wouldn't hesitate to change up that paint schedule as needed. The yellows in his video worked fine for me, but I had to cut WAAAAY back on the green. I'm working on my second attempt now, a nice local saugeye. I think the paint schedule on the video was very helpful to get me started and give me confidence on my first paint job, but I am being a lot more critical and methodical this time.

    The Yellow Ochre they mentioned is working perfect for me, but obviously you will have to use your own colors in varying amounts in order to get that "dead-on" paint job. Just like I had to do with the green. Good luck to you.
     
  18. jbb

    jbb New Member

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    copperheadhill: I am from Minnesota and the walleyes here are faded gold. Not much for green in these walleye's.
    More brown than anything.
     
  19. den007

    den007 Active Member

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    A technique I use on replicas might help. I darken the side of the replica, then individually airbrush each scale up to about the lateral line with a mix of white and yellow ochre. Now, do your gold tipping, I usually throw in a few silver, then mist trans. amber oxide to get the degree of intensity you wish. Sometimes the really "yellow" scales will form distinct rows that can be accentuated by hand with golden yellow or even a golden yellow /orange mix. Mix up the colors a bit, and you can get a nice effect. Some examples in my gallery at www.aa-taxidermy.com