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European mount flaking, please help

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by t4bama, Feb 1, 2007.

  1. t4bama

    t4bama New Member

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    Got my euro mount back from the taxidermist It looked great then about a week later it started flaking. It looks like it has dandruff :mad:
    Took it back to the person who did this mount for me and all he said was his bleach must had been to strong and there was nothing he could do.
    Is there anything I can do to save this mount........
     
  2. Becky P

    Becky P One must believe the glass is half full.

    Sounds like he boiled it and leached all the calcium out.
    I don't know of anything you can do, someone else may know.
     

  3. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Paint it with Elmers White Glue. Do multiple coats and insure you get down inside nasal cavities.
     
  4. t4bama

    t4bama New Member

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    The skull has places about the size of a dime where it has chipped off. Elmer's white glue what will that do?
     
  5. rnviper3

    rnviper3 New Member

    George correct me if I'm wrong, but i do mine with watered down Elmer's. when its runny it soaks in to the bones better. am i correct in doing it this way.
     
    Skulltastic likes this.
  6. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    A piece of that size missing will have to be replaced by epoxy. This is a CLASSIC case of in individual boiling a skull in sal soda unchecked. I can guarantee you this is exactly what happened. Take it to a real taxidemrist and be prepared to pay for those repairs, the skull having to be painted and THEN painted with Elmers.

    Viper, you are correct and I usually add hot water. But for the last coats, I use it straight and as thick as I can find it.
     
  7. wacbravo

    wacbravo TEAM WAC

    Dandruffy skull? I'm not sure if it was a boiling problem, especially if he admitted that he used bleach. Bleach completely destroys bone, making it flaky and brittle even after short-term exposure to the chemical. Overboiling weakens the sutures of the bones and can cause scaling in bad cases, but this takes a lot of time. I've, out of curiosity, left some raccoon skulls in a pot of rapidly boiling water for ten hours. The skulls fell apart, the bones warped and scaled, and when dried they were noticeably more brittle, but they did not flake apart to the extent that you described. Ask the guy who cleaned it about the process and chemicals he used. And if you can, please take a picture of it. I'd like to see the damage for my own knowledge. I'll be damned if it wasn't the bleach.

    Dave
     
  8. Becky P

    Becky P One must believe the glass is half full.

    wacbravo, I thought that might contribute to it also IF he really used "bleach". I'm guilty of saying "bleach" but I would NEVER EVER use bleach. He might have just used that term loosely and really used something like peroxide/basic white. If he really did use bleach, he shouldn't be allowed to ever touch another skull.
     
  9. PA

    PA Guest

    Dave, you missed a word - sal soda. That chemical was potentially added to the boiling skull. While I have never tried using it, I have seen results of skulls prepared by boiling with it - and it made a soak in bleach look tame. Boiling itself won't ruin skulls, they can get mal-alligned - certain junctures can bend out of whack, but boiling itself is not necessarily the problem. It is the additives...
     
  10. t4bama

    t4bama New Member

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    Hey wacbravo, I'll get you picture pretty soon i hope. The falking has got worse and what i mean by dandruff is the wood plaque looks like it has dandruff sitting on it from the skull.
     
  11. wacbravo

    wacbravo TEAM WAC

    Is it all over the skull too? May be powder from a whitening attempt with magnesium carbonate as well. The picks will help. Also, ask that guy about the process used if you can. I'm interested to see what he did to it! PA, I've tried the sal soda thing a few times. Didn't do any good for the skull, and they did look like crap. It is all about the additives, indeed. Becky, I've been guilty of the "bleach" terminology as well. But I wouldn't put it past this guy that the skull was dipped in actual bleach. Some people are content at having no idea what they are doing. It's a real shame...
     
  12. nastydogg

    nastydogg Guest

    fellas i have had this happen to my skulls i have done personally,i use sodium carbonate to boil the skulls and volume40 peroxide to whiten,what causes this problem with those ingredients?Usually boil deer skull for 45mnts to 1hr. at a mix ratio of .25 cup to gallon of water.peroxide is mixed 50/50 with water.Any ideas?
     
  13. Becky P

    Becky P One must believe the glass is half full.

    Nastydogg, probably the boiling is the problem. But why are you diluting the peroxide? If you are going to dilute it, just use the cheaper stuff from wal-Mart, I think it's 3%.
     
  14. nastydogg

    nastydogg New Member

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    becky I use straight volume 40 usually but if i need to i dilute it with no problems just takes longer
     
  15. nastydogg

    nastydogg New Member

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    could boiling the skull at to high a temp be factor,or for to long?
     
  16. joeym

    joeym Jeannette & Joey @ Dunn's Falls

    I rarely simmer skulls anymore, but on a deer, a slow slow simmer is what you need. 8-12 hours where you can just see a little vapor coming off the water. No additive is needed. When I take them out, I pop out the ear canals, and all the flesh on the underside of the skull will come off. I use compressed air and a wire brush to clean off the bits and pieces. Simmering correctly is like maceration...you have to have the patience of Job!!! I keep a couple of skulls in my shop cut linearly, where you can see the entire sinus process...once you see what you are leaving in the sinuses of a simmered skull, you wonder how any of them whiten.
     
  17. Becky P

    Becky P One must believe the glass is half full.

    YES!
     
  18. This post is a good example of why I like maceration.... I have made the error of simmering too long with sal-soda and then had some minor flaking... I could not tell if it was due to the simmer mix I used or the peroxide... or a combo thereof.. now I simply macerate and then use a mild peroxide mixture then rinse off and set in the sun...

    on that first skull I used matte gloss spray as a sealer and it remedied the flaking problem...... it looked rather chalky prior to the application of the sealer though..

    J
     
  19. skull

    skull New Member

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    I agree that maceration is the best way to go. Yes it does take time, but the results are worth the wait. out of any of the skulls I`ve done I have not had any of the problems that people are always asking what went wrong.
     
  20. t4bama

    t4bama New Member

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    Hey, some coworkers and hunters have told me they place their deer skulls in the ground. Anyone tried this?