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Help on getting cured Polyurethane Foam off skin

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by hambone82, Sep 22, 2009.

  1. hambone82

    hambone82 New Member

    Anyone have a method that works?
     
  2. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    A butter knife? I've used sand paper to get it off my finger tips and I know it will grow off eventually. Never tried WD40, but you might want to give it a whirl.
     

  3. michael p.

    michael p. Getting better with age :)

    I hate to say it......but laquer thinner will get it off in 2 seconds. James, you're a nurse so you know the risk's :)
     
  4. hambone82

    hambone82 New Member

    Bailey says, "Thanks George and MP"
     
  5. HOCKEYMAN

    HOCKEYMAN New Member

    283
    0
    what is the danger. mixing it with other things or getting it on your skin? i thank it would be grate if there was a list of the dangers of mixing harmful things or handling of harmful things for us newbies and for others to be awear of
     
  6. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Michael, you're correct about lacquer thinner when it hasn't solidified. I just figured in the time it took him to ask, the foam was hardened and lacquer thinner won't touch it then.
     
  7. BVanKirk

    BVanKirk package deal

    laquer thinner got rid of the sticky stuff before it had a chance to harden, wd40 and some skin loss got rid of the rest
     
  8. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001


    They 're called MSDS sheets! They are available for just about any chemicals you'll ever deal with..
     
  9. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    Back in the dry walling days we used to get the glue out of our hair by rubbing peanut butter on it. Not that the peanut butter cuts the glue, but the oils penetrate the hair and allow the glue to slip off..

    Peanut oil next time..
     
  10. boarhunter67

    boarhunter67 Well-Known Member

    So after painting if I clean my hands with lacquer thinner that would be bad? What does it do? Growing up, my dad always used gasoline to clean his hands after painting. I guess that would be harmful too?
     
  11. HAPP

    HAPP Active Member

    Lacquer thinner is absorbed through the skin, along with a whole lot of other chemicals, including gasoline. Read the label about all the precautions on any thing you use. As for painting with lacquer paints and cleaning your hands, I use PR88 or Invisible Glove. Take about a large acorn size of it and rub it into your hand nail etc. and it will dry. When you are finished, just wash under soap and water and viola..........ALL GONE>
     
  12. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    boarhunter, the LEAST problem you can have is dermatitis. People that have it will tell you that it's not a lot of fun to have your skin crack open and bleed. Wear gloves. I don't trust "invisible" anything. How do you know when it's been breeched? With a rubber glove, you see the tear at least.
     
  13. boarhunter67

    boarhunter67 Well-Known Member

    I used to use latex gloves but they melt when hit with lacquer. Are there form-fitting rubber gloves or other comfortable form-fitting gloves out there or will I have to use some bulky uncomfortable gloves?
     
  14. boarhunter67

    boarhunter67 Well-Known Member

    I have noticed if I have a cut on my hand that putting it in the acid vat speeds the healing process up quite a bit. Would this be bad too or is that okay since it's just a ph thing? What about with the tanning cream? I don't really use gloves with that. Is there a list somewhere I can read that lists everyting I shouldn't touch without gloves? I don't necessarily pay attention to all the warning labels because there are warnings on everything and sometimes they really go overboard, not to mention they are often not in English. I guess it shows how ignorant I am that I've been exposing myself to all these chemicals.
     
  15. I get nitrile gloves from farm supply place..7-9$ for 100 box..thinners dont eat em
     
  16. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001




    Just list everything that you use....then search for the MSDS sheet...


    For those of you that insist on not wearing gloves and washing your body in hazardous chemicals:

     
  17. boarhunter67

    boarhunter67 Well-Known Member

    Thanks. I ordered the nitrile gloves from ebay for $10 including shipping. I had one other question. I use a respirator when painting, but when I spray the clear coat, I can still smell the strong odor. Does this mean the filters need changing or does it not eliminate smell? It's pretty new now so I'm reasonably sure it's okay, but how can I tell when my respirator stops working?
     
  18. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    First off, you have to match the respirator cartridges to the type of vapors you're trying to stop.

    The filters do have a life and become saturated with usage..

    Find a course in the proper usage of respirators...Your lungs will thank you....
     
  19. HOCKEYMAN

    HOCKEYMAN New Member

    283
    0
    thanks cyclone that's what i was wanting.