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The King looks Royal again.

Discussion in 'Taxidermy History' started by Jim McNamara, Oct 24, 2009.

  1. Jim McNamara

    Jim McNamara Well-Known Member

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    I was hired by a Columbus area school to try cleaning up their old mascot. Here are the before and after pictures.
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  2. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,652
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    Ohio
    Hey Jim,

    Nice restoration job on a nice mount to start with! Do you know any of its history? Like, when it was originally mounted, and by whom? The grooming of the chin fur, the set of the eyes and ears, looks very familiar to me, but I don't want to mention anything until I get some background from you, if you have any, that is!

    John.
     

  3. nice job!!
     
  4. Jim McNamara

    Jim McNamara Well-Known Member

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    John,
    The people at the school don't really know. It has been there for many years and was gifted to them. I think it has been there from the 50's but perhaps not quite that long. You are right , it is a very nice mount and is still holding up with no pulled seams or other problems. Whoever did mount it did a good job! Wish I could tell you more.
    Jim
     
  5. Uncle Harley

    Uncle Harley New Member

    John, you thinking that mabey it was the same people that mounted this one? look at the board they used.

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    And the face. but it's hard to tell because as you know the one I did was mistreated BADLY


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  6. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,652
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    Ohio
    Okay ... here's my thought on who mounted it ... Dr. James L. Clark!
    The school's "Mascot"
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    Dr. Clark's Asian Lion for the American Museum of Natural History!
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    Dr. Clark's African Lion for the American Museum of Natural History!
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    The school's Mascot.
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    Dr. Clark's commercial African Lion head mount, front view.
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    Dr. Clark's AMNH African Lion face front view.
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    Dr. Clark's AMNH Asian Lion face front view.
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    The similarities are too much for a coincidence. The grooming of the facial hairs and the mane, attention to detail, the "look" to the eyes, the nose and nostril structure, the conformation of the body, to the placement of the tail, right to the grooming of the tail tuft. The James L. Clark Studios finally closed their doors in late 1949, so it is more than possible this is a Clark Lion. This Lion just "ROARS" James L. Clark, or even possibly Joe Kish -- a HUGE fan of Dr. Clark, so much so that the faces of his African Lion mannikins he sculpted were copies of Dr. Clark's Lions!.
    African Lion mount by Joe Kish show a lot of the "Clark Influence"! I have seen several other Lion mounts over the years that have this "Clark Influence" to them.
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    Another one of those Lions ...
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    It could also have been mounted by one of Dr. Clark's employees who went on to do their own work, but who were trained by Dr. Clark, and held themselves to the same strict standards as the Maestro. One who comes to mind is Mr. John Schneider. To quote Adrian Monk: "I could be wrong, but I don't think so."

    John.
     
  7. Hoss0902

    Hoss0902 I drink to make other people seem more interesting

    Nice work Jim


    Rusty,
    I like your history lessons. They make me appreciate the art of taxidermy even more.