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Wild Boar Questions

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by LC.Bailey, Mar 31, 2010.

  1. LC.Bailey

    LC.Bailey New Member

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    Will be attempting first wild boar could use some tips on everything from skinning to finishing. I understand that the shield is the toughest part of the fleshing, but what about the snout? I'm planning on sending the hide to a tannery are there any different steps in prepping the hide to be sent out other than the usual salting and drying one would use for deer? What are the best forms and should I use a replacement nose? I'm not sure whether I'll be doing an open or closed mouth, but in either of these cases does anybody use the original tusks, I imagine the inserts on open mouths come with them, but what about closed mouths? Any input will be appreciated, Thanks
     
  2. Rick Carter

    Rick Carter Administrator

    WASCO mannikins, DVD269
     

  3. LC.Bailey

    LC.Bailey New Member

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    That was my next step after seeing what replies I get back. Bought your Whitetails A to Z last year and loved it, now I find myself working with your Edge Droop series quite often. Thanks
     
  4. txoutdoors

    txoutdoors Active Member

    Rick does a great video. (as he says....available from WASCO) Explains every step, very informative. WAIT to buy your supplies until after you see the DVD. I ordered everything at once and should have waited to use the jawset he suggested.
     
  5. boarhunter67

    boarhunter67 Well-Known Member

    Don't go with a replacement nose. They look fake. It's easy to scupt in the nostrils and such on the real nose. Buy a nose replacement and use it as reference on all your noses unless you have good pictures. The nostrils' shape is unique to the species. Salt and prep the hide the same as any animal. turn the snout all the way, same as any animal. Buy Rick's video. Plan on going trough a lot of blades when fleshing. Most people expect an open mouth. If you aren't familiar with installing any kind of mouth sets order a form with one installed. Most companies sell forms with mouths pre-installed. If you are looking to make it as easy as possible this first time, buy the mouth set already painted and detailed since you haven't done one before. Don't buy the cheapest ones. Some are cheap plastic and don't look good no matter what you do with them. Some are wax and depending on where you live can melt. When skinning out the head, you shouldn't need to cut up the back or anything. It should slip over the head without any cutting. Other than that, buy Rick's DVD.
     
  6. I watched the DVD today and it was priceless. Buy it.
     
  7. I just did my frist boar and was a little unsure on a few thing . I bought Ricks dvd and it was the best thing I could have done. I would have no problem on doing anouther one.
    Thanks Rick going to pick up a couple other ones !!
     
  8. bill@hogheaven

    [email protected] New Member

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    You will never duplicate the detail found in an artificial nose. Hogs are the only animal I would use an artificial nose on & we always use them. You will waste a LOT of time trying to make a real nose look as good.
     
  9. boarhunter67

    boarhunter67 Well-Known Member

    Bill, I have to disagree. I have yet to see a fake nose that looks anywhere near real. A hog's nose is hairy. What replacement nose is? Post a picture of a replacement nose that comes with all the hair.
     
  10. bill@hogheaven

    [email protected] New Member

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    Most hogs unless they are ringed have very little hair. They are constantly wearing & breaking it off. If hair was necessary its a simple matter to glue a few on. For competition all our noses are original slip casts with all the hair, best of both worlds. Never seen a real nose look as good as a replacement. For commercial work you cant waste that much time prepping & rebuilding a real nose. The object of this is after all to make money.
     
  11. boarhunter67

    boarhunter67 Well-Known Member

    Wow, I stand corrected. I've not seen a replica with hair. Post a picture of one if you could. I'd like to see it to compare. It does sound like the hogs there are different than here. All the hogs here have hair on the noses and most have a lot of hair all over except in the summer. They do have some bare spots especially on the brisket area, but other than that they are pretty hairy. Also, It doesn't seem too hard to rebuild a nose. I've seen some of the replacement noses that have a lot of bumps and crevices, but most of the hogs I get in my shop have very little of that. Here is a couple of pictures of the typical noses around here. Are these any different than the ones you get in? And do your replica noses have as much hair? It's hard to tell from the picture, but the whole front of the nose is also covered with hair.
     
  12. bill@hogheaven

    [email protected] New Member

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    Boarhunter, you seem to not know what slipcasting is....the replica nose picks up every hair that was on the original. The hogs we see are from all over the country & we see well over 200 every year. You are right about the noses not having all the crevices etc you see on the replica nose. Thats because they are dead & have no blood pressure or muscle tone. Our live hogs have all the detail seen on the replica noses. It is actually the hardest part of casting noses, arranging all the detail over & over & injecting them til they freeze hard enough to hold it. We actually usually have to use a doner nose for the comp. hog trying to find one that has enough hair to make it worthwhile. Sorry I dont do the picture posting thing.
     
  13. boarhunter67

    boarhunter67 Well-Known Member

    You're correct there. All I'm familiar with is molding with silicone type products. I would be interested in seeing them. I ordered an artificial hog nose once to use as a reference for when I sculpt the nostrils and it looked like cheap plastic. I also saw the one used in the Rick Carter DVD. Loved the DVD; hated the nose. It was passable, but no where near what I would consider realistic.
     
  14. bill@hogheaven

    [email protected] New Member

    8,017
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    Boarhunter....here is briefly how to slip cast. Mold the nose in silicone. Put the mold & nose in a pail of water cover & let rot. Carefully pour out the rotted remains & clean up with brushes. Let the mold air out, that will take a bit. The hair will still be imbedded in the rubber with just the roots sticking out. Pour your plastic it will grab the hair roots more firmly than the rubber has the hair. Pull the cast, all the hair will now be in the cast. Viola a cast nose with hair!
     
  15. procull

    procull QLD WILD GAME HARVESTER

    Thanks bill , will try one day :)
     
  16. Rick Carter

    Rick Carter Administrator



    X2. If you never saw a realistic artificial nose, you never saw one of Bills.
     
  17. wetandwild

    wetandwild New Member

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    Bill, that is an amazing technique. Thanks for sharing. I love this site. I have yet to mess with any casting yet. But with fishing season at hand. I'm going to study up and give it a shot.