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Ideas for replacing a Van Ingen tiger tail?

Discussion in 'Lifesize Mammals' started by buckhunter, Jan 19, 2011.

  1. buckhunter

    buckhunter Member

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    Hi everyone, I'm working on restoring a 1934 Van Ingen Tiger skin with full mount head that I recently acquired. I've decided to start at the head and work backwards, 1st because it seems the logical way to do it but 2nd because I don't really know what to do when I reach the tail! It's missing between 1/2 and 2/3 of the tail, still got part of the base and the tip, mainly the mid section has gone though. Obviously it's not the sort of thing you can just go out and buy so I'll need to replace it with another type of skin and dye it I suppose, just wondering what would work with the hair length texture etc.. any ideas would be much appreciated! I'll try to get some better pics up soon. Thanks, Patrick. (FYI, these photos were taken prior to any restoration!)
     

    Attached Files:

  2. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

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    Hey Patrick,

    Still working on this big guy, I see. You might want to try some other type of skin that has been dyed with a Tiger stripe pattern. Not real sure where you could find something like that, other then Tandy Leathercraft here in the states. Maybe do an internet search for Tiger stripe pattern skin or fur? Best of luck to you! ;)

    John.
     

  3. buckhunter

    buckhunter Member

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    Hi John, this is actually a new one, the last one I sold back in November! Busy sculpting some teeth for this one in epoxy at the moment as he's only got 1 left on the bottom jaw! Really is a joy to work on such an animal and by such a fantastic taxidermy firm, I can't help but be amazed by the detail and consistency of Van Ingen's work considering the age and the tools they had to work with. Incredible.

    Ok, back to this one, I think whatever colour the fur is whether dyed or not, I'll have to match it to the colour of my skin (fairly faded) anyway. I bought a Springbok skin last week but it's not quite right for what I need. Thanks for your input John, I'll do a more thorough google search.
     
  4. Museum Man

    Museum Man Well-Known Member

    johns right, alot of times cow skins will be tanned with zebra or tiger stripes printed on them....i would also search for that
     
  5. Light Rail Coyote

    Light Rail Coyote Active Member

    Goat skin is similar to tiger fur when it comes to fur length and knap. You'd be better off buying a piece of this and hand dying it yourself. The cow skins are dyed with a stencil pattern and the lines won't match up right for a tail section.

    Nice big tiger, by the way. Does it have the original skull inside, or just the teeth?

    Looking forward to seeing it restored.
     
  6. Not a bad looking tiger despite the faded fur. Most of the old tiger rugs I've seen looked pretty bad. I understand they are old and they had different supplies back then, but some don't even get the tiger's head right.

    Can't wait to see this one finished.
     
  7. buckhunter

    buckhunter Member

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    Thanks for the tip on the goat hair, I'll have a look around for some. The skin is 10 feet long. As far as I know, Van Ingen and Van Ingen were one of the first to pioneer a mould system for taxidermy so they could produce their own forms moulded in a kind of papier mache resulting in a very consistent accuracy that can be seen in all their mounts. It's got original teeth but I'm pretty sure that's all. Very nicely modelled mouth interior too. Unfortunately all his claws are missing, debating whether to replace them with replicas or not. I'll keep you all updated - only doing it very slowly at the moment as I'm waiting for my studio to be built in a couple of weeks which will give me a lot more space/time to work.
     
  8. Riverland

    Riverland New Member

    For the tail you might try the belly fur off a coyote and trim and dye or paint it to match.
     
  9. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,659
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    You've obviously never been around a live Tiger. ::) And before you ask ... yes I have ... right in the cage with them. ;) No ... Coyote belly fur is not a good recommendation. ;) :-\ It is too long and sparse, and trimming it will only make it look mangy. I have to agree ... the hair on a Goat hide will most likely fit the bill perfectly!

    Forgive my 'ass-u-me'! ;) ;D How cool is it that you get to work on restoring these wonderful Van Ingen Tiger rugs. They certainly were ahead of their time! I have seen old pictures of their lifesize Tiger mounts and I have to admit I was very impressed, considering the era in which they were mounted!

    As always Patrick ... best of luck with this project.

    Take care,
    John.
     
  10. Light Rail Coyote

    Light Rail Coyote Active Member

    I'm replacing the claws on my antique lioness rug. I'm using polyform plastic, which dries semi-transparent with a white-ish color very similar to actual claws. You can also buy pre made ones from the taxidermy supply companies.
     
  11. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,659
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    Indian Taxidermist Van Ingen & Van Ingen
    (1900 - 1998)

    [​IMG]
    Taxidermist Van Ingen & Van Ingen Trophy Room

    Van Ingen & Van Ingen (1900–1998) were Indian taxidermists located in Mysore, South India, best known for their vast numbers of tiger and leopard taxidermy mounts now scattered throughout the world in the form of head mounts, full mounts, flat animal rugs, and rug mounts with heads attached.

    [​IMG]
    Taxidermist Van Ingen & Van Ingen Tiger Rug

    The Van Ingens served the highest of international nobility as well as the maharajas of India, preserving their "shikar" hunting trophies in the most lifelike poses and in the utmost beauty, uncomparable to any other taxidermists in the world.

    [​IMG]
    Hunting Tigers in India

    Work
    The sole purpose company was renowned for their work on big game trophies, covering mainly tigers, leopards and bears. Van Ingen & Van Ingen firm was run by three brothers Botha, De Wet and Joubert Van Ingen who were trained by their father and founder of the taxidermy firm, Eugene Van Ingen. They employed almost 100 employees in the time of great demand between 1900 to 1960.

    [​IMG]
    Taxidermist Van Ingen & Van Ingen Leopard Rug

    Joubert is the only brother still alive. In the book Van Ingen & Van Ingen - Artists in Taxidermy author Pat Morris meets Joubert in Mysore at age 92.

    Van Ingen & Van Ingen published various books on taxidermy, the most notable entitled, The Preservation of Shikar Trophies, Artists in Taxidermy, Mysore. Van Ingen & Van Ingen did commissioned work for the highest nobility, including British and Indian royalty.

    Legacy
    Their book, The Preservation of Shikar Trophies, Artists in Taxidermy, Mysore is considered the main source for information on the abundance of wild leopards and tigers once found in the wild.

    [​IMG]
    Taxidermist Van Ingen & Van Ingen Tiger Head 1934

    In 2004 the UK's Dr. Pat Morris travelled to Mysore, met Joubert then returned to author and publish the book Van Ingen & Van Ingen - Artists in Taxidermyin 2006 , which shows the history, quality and depth of what was once the world's largest taxidermy company. The book also contains actual photocopies of the factory workbook records of the Van Ingen factory.

    One of the three brothers De Wet Van Ingen (now deceased), still holds the record for the largest Mahseer ever caught on a rod.

    Business Days
    In their heyday, factory records show that Van Ingen processed over 400 Tigers per year from the 1930s till the 1960s. The firm also employed over 100 workers in this time to support the high workload, with jobs from cleaning, skinning, salting, pickling, mounting, carpentry, finishing, decorating and offloading. It was only until the late 60's that work began to decline where regulations and laws introduced saw the rapid decline in the hunting of tigers.

    [​IMG]
    Taxidermist Van Ingen & Van Ingen Tiger Head

    The firm remained active right up until 1998 with very few workers, although a world now changed and with the endangered species of tiger no longer being a hunting target, the firm had no choice but to close its doors.

    (Original Factory Records of vast numbers of animals processed in the factory (not only tigers) but also leopards, bears, lions, other cats and various other ungulates are reproduced in Pat Morris' book Van Ingen & Van Ingen - Artists in Taxidermy)

    Van Ingen & Van Ingen Today
    Today, Van Ingen Taxidermy pieces are found in various countries, rarities due to wear of old age or kept away in private collections. Some are found in auction houses throughout Britain sometimes finding themselves a high price due to their preserved quality.

    [​IMG]
    Taxidermist Van Ingen & Van Ingen Tiger Head

    Van Ingen & Van Ingen Tiger "rugs with headmount" as well as heads on shields are usually inherited from family members through the ages and sometimes sold due to little or no interest.

    Sadly, today there is little to no information regarding these great taxidermists, apart from P.A. Morris' extroadinary book, the Van Ingen factory in Mysore, India lies derelict overgrown by the local jungle and the only living survivor of the Van Ingen legacy, Joubert Van Ingen is almost 97 years of age.

    [​IMG]
    Taxidermist Van Ingen & Van Ingen Trophy Room

    In 2010 a bid to immortalise the Van Ingen legacy, a series of videos and interviews at the factory is planned by individual fans who wish to keep the Van Ingen history alive forever, although more information will be released in time to come.

    The finest Taxidermist company from India who have cured & preserved the most tigers in the world & lots of animal skins.
     
  12. buckhunter

    buckhunter Member

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    UK
    Great article John. I cannot recommend enough the book by Dr. Pat Morris on the Van Ingen and Van Ingen firm for anybody who is interested.

    Should be moving on to the ears tomorrow, seem to be missing a bit of hide in places and are split.
     
  13. Riverland

    Riverland New Member

    John as a matter of fact I have been very close to a live tiger might even say I had one by the tail and the fiasco that happened during the process of putting him down. I skinned out a 800+ lb siberian tiger that had to be euthanizied because it attacked a person while it was being relocated. I was the first person in the pen afterward where I with the help of a couple others removed it and proceeded to skin it and eventually mounted it. So I even have a good idea of what they look like on the inside. I have also done this process with African lions as well. When you are standing over a "dead" 600+ lb lion in an 8x10 cage and you pick up his head and the air trapped in his lungs comes out as a very deep growl it makes for a very livlely moment in your life. As far as the suggestion I had that is what it was. The coyotes we have in the upper midwest can have much coarser hair than coyotes found in the west. The shears that beaticians use on humans for thinning hair work excellant for triming/blending in repairs on mammals. So as far as making an "ass u me" out of yourself there Jackwagan I think you have succeded. There are others that frequent this site besides you that have and STILL do work on large cats.

    Doug Sinniger
    World Champion
    Riverlandstudio.com
     
  14. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,659
    176
    Ohio
    Wow ... must be awful being on the rag like you are!
     
  15. michael p.

    michael p. Getting better with age :)




    His comment is likened to "being on the rag" ::) I thought it was quite timid ???
     
  16. Helltigress

    Helltigress New Member

    Well, for what my two cents are worth, I would suggest using tail fur from another "big cat" like a cougar and then blending/painting that fur to matching pattern.
     
  17. gladysphilips

    gladysphilips jackal? it's a jackal!! jackal? a jackal!!!

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    funny coincidence - i have a tail from a van ingen tiger somewhere in my house. i acquired a rug, but the back feet were so bad we just cut it off in the middle and restored the front half. i kept the tail, and i know it's around somewhere. i'm traveling right now, but if you're interested, send me a pm next week and i'll see if i can find it.
     
  18. Light Rail Coyote

    Light Rail Coyote Active Member

    Patrick is in the UK. If you're in the USA, it'll be REALLY hard to ship the tail to him legally unless you have the proper paperwork. Even if it's pre-ban, tigers are protected by more international laws than you can shake a stick at.