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how 2 sew a dorsal cut

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by r.rase78, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. i cut my cape all the way down the back not knowing i could of just made the small y incision after i finish fleshing shoud i start sewing or sew on mannikin? if i dont sew on mannikin should i start from top of neck and work down toward chest? i would think if starting from shoulders tou could have sum left over at top were as if u started at the top excess would not matter as much
     
  2. FIELD2FOREVER

    FIELD2FOREVER The more I learn, The more I don't Know!!

    After you finish fleshing, you either need to continue with the tanning proses, or DP I assume you've got that much figured out. Anyhooo prep manikin, test fit, etc. if all is well start at the base of one burr, sew out to the point of your y, tie off. then start at the base of opposite burr and sew out to point of y. I usually like to tie off there again and start with a fresh piece of thread then continue down the back. Sew with evenly spaced stitches take your time and try not to take to big of bites between stitches. Sometimes you can find little cuts or ruff edges that can be matched up from one side of the incision to the other which will help in making sure that your sewing evenly. Hope this helps!!
     

  3. rocco

    rocco New Member

    I sew on the mannikin for a split cape. But the choice is yours, just make sure that you match the hide evenly on both sides of the cut or you will have bumps in your seam. Go slow. Beginners always rush, and end up studying their mistakes. Even if you use epoxy hide paste, you still have about 4 hours or more to get everything taxied in place. USE REFERENCE!! Best of luck and put up some pics when your done. :)
     
  4. thanks everyone ill prolly sew on mannikin its what i think will be best for me i got some t pins i can use to pin hide as i go down. thanks again:)
     
  5. rocco

    rocco New Member

    Pin your brisket before you start. That will help you line up the cut without getting it all willy-nilly. After you sew the seam you can lift up the cape kinda like takin a shirt off and apply your paste to mannikin. It will help you from getting paste all over the hair. I sew about 4 inches and then take a paintbrush with paste on it and slip it up under the incision to get it under the seam. Hide paste RULES!
     
  6. thanks rocco. i ordered sum of that paste rick carter uses in his video forget what its called but its suppose to smell GOOD!!!
     
  7. rocco

    rocco New Member

    Haha..I never smelled a paste that smelled good. I read about Roman 555 on here and decided to try it..I kinda like it but I'm used to using epoxy so it makes me nervous. I wouldn't reccommend it to you now at the beginner stage but later on you should try using epoxy ( Killer Glue or Headlock) on your faces, antler burrs ,briskets and any deep detail in your forms your trying to keep. For now your good with regular set paste because it gives you plenty of time to adjust your skin in case you find any mistakes. Epoxy will lock the hide in about 8 hours and any mistakes will be permanent. Welcome to the taxidermy world..the land of concurrent frustration and satisfaction. ;D
     
  8. nibjones

    nibjones Join your States Taxidermy Assoc.

    Lay your cape on a table folded hair side in. Line up the y and both edges of the seam. Take a sharpie and make lines across the seam on both sides, every 6" and stop 6-8" from the top of the incision. Start sewing with a loop stitch at the top line and work your way to the back of the shoulders. Make sure you keep the hair out of the stitches. That will leave you with a short seam, with invisible stitches, even for a beginner. You will be a lot less frustrated with sewing that way vs. on the mannikin
     
  9. CarlScroggins

    CarlScroggins Oct. 25 1985...It was a good day.

    I would take Brians advice.
     
  10. bmdakk

    bmdakk Report to moderator

    sewing on the bench is the way to go . A lot less agrivation.
     
  11. FIELD2FOREVER

    FIELD2FOREVER The more I learn, The more I don't Know!!

    Bammm There it was. That's why I love this site. I'd never thought of marking a cape like that on the bench and sewing till you had a short Y then mounting. Holy crap, honestly I feel kinda stupid but that's great advise Brian. Next one is getting done that way, no doubt!!
     
  12. verne

    verne Well-Known Member

    I`ve always sew the cape to make a short y cut ; saves time when you mount and makes a for a better looking seam.
     
  13. rocco

    rocco New Member

    It is a great idea to sew up a cape on the bench but I have been doing it on the form so long I would probably screw it all up. I don't get too many split capes anymore so I never even worry about it too much..plus I actually LIKE to sew. :eek:
     
  14. dktaxidermy

    dktaxidermy I'm on top of the dirt; how bad can it be?

    i just got done spending an hour and a half sewing a long "y" cyt, it was so long it went pst the end of my mannikin. the next one i think i will follow Brian's advice.

    LOL
     
  15. smallfish

    smallfish New Member

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    Pin your brisket before you start. That will help you line up the cut without getting it all willy-nilly. After you sew the seam you can lift up the cape kinda like takin a shirt off and apply your paste to mannikin. It will help you from getting paste all over the hair.
     
  16. smallfish

    smallfish New Member

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    Start sewing with a loop stitch at the top line and work your way to the back of the shoulders. Make sure you keep the hair out of the stitches.
     
  17. Quill

    Quill New Member

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    This is how I have always done my sewing, marking with a sharpie REALLY makes a difference in making sure you keep the cape in alignment. Question....I always use two needles and two threads, is this the best method?
     
  18. nibjones

    nibjones Join your States Taxidermy Assoc.

    To sew up the long cut, I use 1 needle and 1 thread. I don't see why 2 would help matters any
     
  19. Quill

    Quill New Member

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    Well, I think I read an article on it in Breakthrough several years ago, can not remember who, they explained that pulling both sides snug at the same time will keep it flatter, I thought it made sense, but never have been sure if it matters, I do find having two threads makes it easier to tie off at the end.

    Q,
     
  20. FIELD2FOREVER

    FIELD2FOREVER The more I learn, The more I don't Know!!

    Brian, you said you use an invisible stitch to sew up the long part of the incision. What kind of stitch are you using to sew up the short Y?