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Wrapped mounts only

Discussion in 'Lifesize Mammals' started by snowhare, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. Thanks for the compliments...I made my dog get into that position several times to see how his bones and muscles sit...then he'd get a beef jerky for being a good model :)

    the fox doesn't get back from the tannery for a few more weeks....I can't wait to mount him!!! and I'm excited to try out doing that stretched out lip that canines get when they find that just right scratchy spot.........I'll post the pics...
     
  2. RTF

    RTF Active Member

    Now that right there is hysterical . I love it !
     

  3. RageofAnath

    RageofAnath Will make art for money or dead things.

    I love the mounts in this thread!

    I especially love mounting very small animals such as ermine so I can't wait for the DVD, I'm going to learn so much...
    the jumping ermine is so beautiful...
     
  4. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

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    If any of you who would "love to learn this" would just pick up a Taxidermy book, especially an older one, you would learn. This is not new people, so stop acting like its the second coming. ::) I cannot believe that there are ao many that are so bone-lazy that the thought of READING A BOOK is so foreign. How do you think any of us learned how to wrap a body? Most Bird Taxidermists still wrap bodies. :eek: This information didn't just fall out of the sky! This method has been written about as far back as William T. Hornaday's book about Taxidermy from the 1800's! And it is a method that has been covered in every book written about general Taxidermy practices, right up through and including The Breakthrough Mammal Taxidermy Manual. READ!!! It's Fun-damental! ;)

    John.
     
  5. Kastaway

    Kastaway Taxidermist, Pioneer of Freeze Drying 1969

    Yes you can read about it, but seeing it done by someone that has mastered the process is so much easier to understand, not counting the new tips Snowhare uses. I used the process in 1962 when I started, but I learned a lot more while filming Snowhare.
     
  6. B Jones

    B Jones Memeber of - NTA,UTA,AIT.Proud Member of NZTA.

    Snowy, John and others thanks for posting. The time tested techniques prove to still be the way to do an awesome mount. I need to get away from foam and do some wrapping. John can you recomend some good books.

    Snowy your future DVDs should be a future purchase as well.
     
  7. RageofAnath

    RageofAnath Will make art for money or dead things.

    Books are for old people :p
     
  8. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

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    Time for the children on here to grow up!

    Joe ... nothing against what you cats did, and you know damn well how much I respect you and what you have done for this industry. I don't know how many times I've called you "The Dean" - and not like in Martin! ;) ;D

    I just think it's time for these children to get off their asses, and crack open a book or two, or three. Nothing wrong with paper pages. Worked for guys like us! ;)

    Brad, some good titles include:

    "The Breakthrough Mammal Taxidermy Manual" available from WASCO and other suppliers. One of the Gold Standards of our time.

    These other titles are harder to find ... many are out of print. They are often found on eBay, and sometimes for sale here in the For Sale section. You can also post your needs in the Wanted section. I have gotten very nice results from there! You can also check the local Public Libraries in your area!

    I have been scanning many of these publications for some time now, and will be able to make them available via e-mail as time allows ... getting them done between Taxidermy jobs for clients.

    "Jonas Technique Vol. 2 Mammals" by Joe Kish 1978

    "How To Mount Lifesize Animals" by Archie & Bubba Phillips

    "Advanced Taxidermy Methods" by PJ O'Conner

    "Practical Taxidermy" by John W. Moyer 1953

    Any of Leon L. Pray's little pamphlets ... if you can find them. His "The Squirrel Mounting Book" from 1956 is a real gem, and will be scanned and made available shortly.

    "Taxidermy And Museum Exhibition" by John Rowley 1925-1935 editions

    "Complete Home Taxidermy" by Tim Kelly 1987

    "Taxidermy Step By Step" by Waddy F. McFall 1975

    These are but a sampling of what is out there, and all of them have small mammal sections where the specimen is mounted by the wrapped body method. Some even describe how to work on a specimen with no skull.

    Get your feet wet and your appetite whetted with these printed books, then buy the DVD when it come available. You will at least have a working knowledge of what is being shown on your screen! I'll order them just to put a face - and maybe a voice - to the guy I've been corresponding with over the last few years! ;)

    John.
     
  9. If you can believe it, my school's library actually has taxidermy manuals on-hand (as well as the Carnegie and University of Pittsburgh's) that I've been trying to get a hold of. Oddly enough, not WASCO's... most of the one's I've tried to order out of storage are from earlier.

    ALTHOUGH! Here in my sculpture classes I've been taught some basic wrapping techniques (not for taxidermy, but just to create light, round forms)... I'm looking forward to the DVD to see someone actually wrap a subject (pictures and experimentation are fantastic, and video is just another way to learn, methinks!).

    I love that fox! It's also great that you used a living canine reference for it (poor dog...)... heh.
     
  10. B Jones

    B Jones Memeber of - NTA,UTA,AIT.Proud Member of NZTA.

    John,

    Thanks for taking so much time to suggest some titles for us that want to read.
     
  11. John you forgot "Art of Taxidermy" by John Rowley. I wouldn't recommend using some of the preservation methods in some of those old books though: "Using arsenic to poison the hide." Yikes.
     
  12. Kastaway

    Kastaway Taxidermist, Pioneer of Freeze Drying 1969

    Thanks John for the kind words. It is nice to see a rebirth of a very old way of mounting. I agree if you start with books you will have a good base for learing wrapping bodies. Didn't mean to sound harsh with my post. Didn't mean anything bad what so ever..
     
  13. alexm

    alexm New Member

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    Thanks Snowy I saw one like that one time ;D ;D ;D I have to agree with John ... It must be an age thing this is how we taught ourselves back when we started no one would share any thing !!! As today its all out there thanks to great people who share ! I started wrapping again when I got tired of trying to fit a form onto the drift wood after a while I remember the fun I had doing it being able to say look what I made , not look what I sewed up ;) We actually learned anatomy . I remember my Mum always saying there were no coat hanger in the house I had used all of them for birds and things
    I guess things have changed we used to spend time in the woods as kids , not playing video games ours would be building tree forts or opening of trout season ,and learning Taxidermy with the old Northwestern School .
    Alex M
     
  14. Bill Yox

    Bill Yox Well-Known Member

    I own most of those books listed. I understand the spirit of what John is suggesting too. I also look forward to Joes videos from snowhare as well. I personally would like to see how one of my respected fellow taxidermists tackles such details as defining leg tendons, details in how HE carves the head, the transition from the wrapped body to the carved head, for example. Also, does he wrap tight to pose, or wrap loose and pose later? Those details are not outlined in the books, so Im going to be looking at the vids too. The books should be everyones foundation, just as practicing the process should be. But...Hurry up Joe!!!
     
  15. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

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    Codi,

    John Rowley's "The Art Of Taxidermy" is the first book he wrote on the subject. The one I listed is an expanded version of the same book, with more "modern" - for their time - methods, as well as an expanded tanning chapter. It is a larger, thicker, version of his first book. ;)

    And Arsenic is very useful when used properly. Hell, anything can kill you if abused! It has been recorded that the users of Arsenic did not have shorter lives than those who didn't use it. These men were also very cognizant of their general work practices to begin with. Arsenic is most deadly when ingested ... basically, orally. Many who used it wore those old heavy early rubber chemical gloves. Not all ... but I do know of a few old timers who lived into their eighties, and Arsenic was their only moth proofing agent. It was habits like smoking that did them in. There are those in the field that use it even today. With care, and awareness of what you are doing, it can be used safely. There are acids used in pickles that can prove to be more hazardous than Arsenic. It really has gotten a bad rap! Now Formaldehyde ... I've used it in the past, but I wouldn't think of using it now. It is highly carcinogen ... cancer causing.

    Care with all products should be our mantra. ;)

    John.
     
  16. snowhare

    snowhare New Member

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    Well

    It Seems i missed AL this ;D , yup te time differnts on here eh , i never used a book , i started by getting a old mount from a olddddddddddddd shop took it apart and voila a WRAPPED BODY in there, so i just kept on trying and trying and trying , with out the help of books , cause i have big tim reading problems and i am dyslectic too, and left handed , so over all me a retard than eh :eek:

    But for you iff like to use a book , be my gast , it ll be hard to see what they are dooing in there , i have seen em but me no like em things , just cause i am oldschool i
    think

    Wrapping in Europe is nothing special its friggen normal to do down here , i thik it is cause we dont have all em thousends of strange ridget forms to bay that never fit

    SNOWY
     
  17. RTF

    RTF Active Member

    X1000 ............I cannot agree more. This is exactly how I feel.

    I learned to wrap bodies from books before the internet days and even have a pic posted in this thread showing my wrapped bodies from back in the day. I'll never forget the day when I met up with another taxidermist who was well established and I was just getting started. I was talking to him about squirrel forms and i could not find the right poses I wanted. He looked at me like I was a lunatic on crack and his exact words was, if you are going to get into this business you better damn well know how to wrap bodies. He really got on my case on the subject. My only regret today is that I strayed from the practice of wrapping bodies. That is something I am going to change.
     
  18. snowhare

    snowhare New Member

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    JUST TO BE SURE HERE I DONT HATE THE BOOKS IT IS JUST THAT I HAVE TROUBLE READING OK , SO DONT BE PI SS ED OF HERE

    So now some more pictures

    SNOWY
     
  19. RTF

    RTF Active Member

    Snowy, I don't think anyone is pissed off here. At least I don't read any posts that show that.
     
  20. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

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    No problem J ... understandable. The only problem I am having these days with wrapping is holding my hands in the position long enough and tight enough to wrap properly ... Arthritis in my hands sucks! It gets aggravating after a while, having to constantly stop and shake my hands out and wring my fingers. Then my hands are dog tired, so I shy away from wrapping nowadays. If you can avoid it ... don't age! Sewing is not so bad ... the fingers constantly move. But holding excelsior tight enough and long enough is a little painful. :mad:

    Cliff,

    Sounds like the same guys I went to work with! I'm originally from New York. "Born and raised in Brooklyn, grew up on Long Island." Those old guys were a trip! ;D

    John.