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egg tanning

Discussion in 'Tanning' started by hunterboy, Jun 9, 2011.

  1. Dogsteaks

    Dogsteaks New Member

    My advice is that if you're interested in keeping this pelt for more than a novelty item, say, a wallhanger or anything else taxi-related is to skip the eggs and find a tanning solution instead.
    In my personal opinion, egg-tanning is just asking to ruin a pelt. It's not a tan, it's nowhere close to being a tan, and as explained by other members here it's a primitive method of making leather. There's a reason brain and egg tanning is mostly used on hides, and not furs...

    If you're a beginner looking to tan your first pelts or you're looking to tan a fur of high value to you, Rittel has a tanning kit available on their website that is easy to use and suitable for beginners. The more high-end tanning solutions used by taxidermists can be bought online or by shipping pelts out to commercial tanneries.

    I've actually seen this touted as another method. Yes, I once read that you can "tan" with mayonnaise. ::)

    George is a long-time member on the forums and knows what he's talking about. If you come to a forum like this, ask a question that really has no place here beyond being linked off-site to a website catering to it, and then get mad when a professional tells you that it's not a correct way to tan a pelt... there is really no reason to get so mad.
    If someone truly wants to learn, be educated, and discover the error of their ways, they need to be open to the criticisms of others who are more experienced than themselves.
    OP came here asking for advice on egg-tanning, was told that it's not the correct way to tan a pelt and isn't even a true tan, and fired back by calling people know-it-alls. If OP knew what he was bringing up, why would he have asked the question? Why would he have come to a taxidermy forum asking for advice? Beginners need to be guided to the right directions so that they don't ruin pelts. I would feel extremely guilty if I told a beginner on here to brain-tan that roadkill fox they found, only for them to ruin a nice pelt and become heartbroken over it.

    Guide the newcomers in the right direction. The right direction in this case is to stay away from egg-brain-mayo-breakfast tanning and use actual tanning solutions if you have any desire to create anything but hard leather.
     
  2. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    ::)

    You obviously have never read any posts by MSbraintan. Paulette does some fine work. Those who understand how brain tanning works know it's value. Hard leather? Really? I'd be willing to bet a dollar to a dime that I have some "peanut oil" softened and tanned leather that will hold up to washing dozens and dozens of times while your paint on tan is ruined in the first wash..
     

  3. Dogsteaks

    Dogsteaks New Member

    I did; she posted a few images on the previous page. Now I have to ask you, how long do you think MsBraintan has been doing what she does? How many hides do you think she's worked with?
    How many hides do you think OP has worked with, let alone brain/egg-tanned? Do you think OP would ruin a couple pelts they could otherwise chemically tan, before they learned that there are better methods of tanning hides that don't involve eggs or mayonnaise?

    Chemical tans were made to be re-hydrated because they're used for taxidermy, so yes I believe that my "paint-on tan" (or soak tan) would hold up to many more rehydrations than an egg tan ever could, because a chemical tan is made to tan skin, eggs and mayonnaise are not, and they're better off on a BLT or in a frying pan.
     
  4. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I can wear my brain tanned buckskins in the rain and mud all week long and then wash them in the washing machine over and over, year after year and they are as soft as a shammy cloth or a cotton flannel shirt. Don't know about the other methods but I do know that brain tanned leather can be very soft washable.
     
  5. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    Really? So there are no chemical that are used in brain tanning? Guess again.
     
  6. Dogsteaks

    Dogsteaks New Member

    Brain-tanning and egg-tanning are not chemical tans. Is this really even an argument?
     
  7. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    Guess again. Try doing a little research.

    Hint: Everything you can touch, smell and taste and see are chemicals.
    Yes, it is an argument although weak as heck on one side...
     
  8. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    roflmao, yes cyclone children never learn about science these days, hmm just wondering if were chemically balanced or not. Gota just my P with the pH strips and see. Naw it's just water and waste, I'm ok.
     
  9. Dogsteaks

    Dogsteaks New Member

    I once heard someone suggest using urine to tan hides. Those would be some award-winning mounts and lovely fur coats! ::)
     
  10. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    Funny you mention urine, some components are used today for pickling hides and I'm positive some award winners have used those compounds. ;)
     
  11. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    In some countries, fine garment leather is produced from urine and pigeon poo. There must be some kind of chemicals in there to get the job done. I would prefer to wear a brain tanned garment than a " chemical" tanned one. I bought some buckskin from a tannery and didn't like wearing it nearly as much as a brain tanned one. Wall hangers could easily be tanned or dressed in any of those methods as well as garment products. Not sure about actual taxidermy mounting, but, one has to ask, if they work for garment and wall hangers, then why not?
     
  12. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    Brain tanning, as we call it, is a bit of a misnomer as it is not the actual braining that tans the hides. Braining, egging, soap and oil, and peanut oil as I have used are merely the fat liquoring steps. All of these items contain fatty acids which are somewhat water soluble and soak into the collagen lattice. The actual tan, the crosslinking of collagen strands, comes about when the hide is smoked. And yes, it most certainly is a tan both by ancient and modern standards.
     
  13. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Ever hear the saying "so poor I don't have a pot to piss in"? In the old days poor people pee'd in pots and brought them in to sell to the tanner to use in tanning the hides into LEATHER.
     
  14. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    yep sure did and hmm chemicals perfect acid for a pickle but not mine lol
     
  15. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I'm so poor that all I have is a pot to piss in. Some day when I am rich I'll be able to afford those fancy pickling chemicals. Collecting pigeon poo takes up a lot of time also. What smell?
     
  16. Dogsteaks

    Dogsteaks New Member

    I'm well aware that it's been used for making leather, the reason I brought it up is because just because it's been used doesn't mean it should ever be suggested over more modern, proven methods like chemical tanning.
     
  17. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Frank E. Kotula

    Frank E. Kotula master, judge, instructor

    Well said Cyclone ROFLMAO ( damm new age chemical tanning)