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Wrapped mount question

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by PluckyPossum, Aug 28, 2011.

  1. PluckyPossum

    PluckyPossum New Member

    85
    0
    Maine
    Hey all just a quick question,
    I am getting ready to mount up a little red squirrel. In the past I have mostly been doing very small mounts for practice such as mice, rats and recently a small weasel. (Also my first mounts which were a few grey squirrels that turned out so badly that I like to pretend they don't exist!) :(
    So any how on the mice and rats I made clay heads and just pinned them as they dried with no glue/paste. The weasel however dried a little "snarly". So I was wondering if any of you use glue/paste on a clay head for wrapped mounts? Sorry if this seems like a stupid question. Thanks!
     
  2. Alex B.

    Alex B. New Member

    29
    0
    ND
    Hey there, I'm a beginner myself but in the mammal breakthrough manual on a wrapped squirrel they didn't use hide paste, but he did use super glue on the lips. Hope this helps some.
     

  3. krusher167

    krusher167 New Member

    super glue is the not best alternative to hide paste because it gives u a working time of about 10 seconds....
     
  4. redwolf

    redwolf Active Member

    PluckyPossum, I would suggest taking a small piece of foam and carve the head. Use the Real head as reference.
     
  5. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Let's talk about "snarly" mounts. Certainly a wrapped body CAN work, but the best mounts have bodies wrapped that took one helluva lot of experience first. Most of our look "snarly" compared with the folks who can pull it off correctly.That's exactly why I always suggest that beginners use commercial forms for their mounts. Nothing is more frustrating that spending hours mounting an animal only to find it looks too "snarly" to show anyone. The commercial form is to taxidermists what molding is to carpenters. It dresses up your work and hides the small imperfections.

    IF you can't find a form (it's hard to believe John David Ellzey doesn't have one that fits your animal), then Bob's suggestion of carving one from foam is the better bet. Foam can be smoothed with a rasp or sandpaper. Unlike wrapped bodies, you won't find any "lumps" under the skin when you're done. Once you skin the animal out, use the carcass as your reference.
     
  6. You could buy a foam squirrel change-out head to go with your wrapped body, or use the real skull with foam or mache.

    The snarly-ness could also be from not turning or thinning the skin enough.
     
  7. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Somehow I doubt that Codi. My first wrapped bodies made the animals look like they had mumps or hives and it's tough to get true symmetry. When you press in one side, the other is off and vice versa. I know my shoddy work certainly improved immeasurably when foam forms came out.
     
  8. Wrapping has nothing to do with a mount having a 'snarly' head George. If you read her post, it was about clay heads and glue, not lumpy bodies.
     
  9. redwolf

    redwolf Active Member

    Snowhare's video would help on all aspects.
     
  10. PluckyPossum

    PluckyPossum New Member

    85
    0
    Maine
    Thanks everyone!
    Sorry I haven't replied recently, I had lost power from the storm.
    I think the wrapped body I did came out ok, not amazing or anything. I can notice at least 3-4 things I did wrong and knowing is half the battle so they say...
    Where is a good place to get some foam for heads? Would florist foam work?
    I was also aiming more towards getting the lips right, they were pinned wrong while drying and a chunk of clay fell off the front "teeth" area, so the lips pulled back some.
    In the past I found that super gluing the mouth had a strange looking outcome, giving it a "puckered" look as the skin shrank while it dried.
    Thanks for all the input : )
     
  11. krusher167

    krusher167 New Member

    if ur talking about that green florist foam, i carved a fish body on it recently and found that it was too low density or "soft"... when shaping it i found that uneeded to go very deliberately otherwise chunks would just break off since it couldnt stand up to that much stress... u could make it work, u just need to treat it very gingerly...
     
  12. PluckyPossum

    PluckyPossum New Member

    85
    0
    Maine
    Yeah, I could see that being too soft. Thanks!