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150 yr old Quagga Mount - Does Black Fade to Brown in That Amt of Time?

Discussion in 'Lifesize Mammals' started by RedWolf7, Sep 6, 2011.

  1. RedWolf7

    RedWolf7 Member

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    I'm making a 1:9 model of the extinct quagga for a client, and I've been looking at photos of mounted specimens for details on color and markings. They all appear to be medium brown with cream stripes, not at all like the Amsterdam quagga who was photographed alive. It's a b/w photo, but she clearly looks quite a bit darker than these mounted animals, especially on the mane. Is it possible that these mounted quaggas once did have black and white stripes up front with chestnut behinds? Looking at paintings done at the time is inconclusive.
     
  2. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

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    The short answer is no. Black - as perceived and created by Man - is not a naturally occurring color. In fact in the world of 'color' black is the absence of all color.

    Quagga colors varied from a solid brown body, with cream or off white legs with some faint brown striping, with the white stripe markings and very dark brown striping ... to lighter body shades of brown with light or white striping and very dark brown striping. Basically ... a partial Zebra pattern on the forequarters - shoulders, neck and head.
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    Any variations in coat color have much to do with their geographic region of habitation, and what was required for their survival ... Man was very nearly wholly responsible for their extinction.

    Zebra coat colors vary widely as well, including the existence of melanistic or 'black' specimens, as well as white or extraordinarily pale specimens.

    If you look closely at the stripes of Zebra, you will see that the darkest of stripes are in reality a very dark brown. Black Leopards ... very dark brown, and their even darker spots are visible under certain lighting conditions. Raccoon masks ... very dark brown, and so on. ;)

    So in fact, 'black' does not fade to brown ... it is brown. A very, very dark shade of brown.

    Painting the miniature you are creating will be a matter of your own personal choice. Have fun with it, and best of luck to you! ;)

    John.
     

  3. lorefuma

    lorefuma Member

    looks here http://www.quaggaproject.org/
     
  4. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

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    The problem is the Quagga was a specific species that was obliterated from the planet ... it was not just a color.

    The problem with the organization in the link, is they are breeding for color - Quagga color - and patterns, but they are simply breeding and re-breeding Zebra to attain this. It will not work. The animal itself, the actual Quagga, is long gone. Extinct is forever. The very last Quagga that ever lived died in captivity. There is no remaining bloodline.

    Breeding Zebra that "look" like Quagga does not make a Quagga. It was not a color ... it was a species.

    People like that really bug me. They raise all this money and get all these grants from unknowing saps who think they are going to bring back an extinct species. I've already mentioned about the unlimited variation of Zebra markings and color patterns. People like this exploit that for some noble mindset that they are going to bring a species back from extinction ... from the dead ... when in reality all they are doing is diluting the gene pool of a certain appearing Zebra for their color only. This involves much inbreeding, which any true biologist or geneticist will tell you is never a good thing.

    The oddly marked Zebra from the site you linked to, are no more a Quagga than this Burchell's Zebra mare, which looks more like the Quagga from the old black and white photos than those from the Quagga Project website. Luckily for this mare, I have not seen her on anyone's website trying to resurrect the dead.
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    Just a touch of the variations of Zebra coat and color patterns were illustrated by Jonathan Kingdon in his series of "East African Mammals" books:
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    [​IMG]

    At any rate, RedWolf7, do your research, take your time, and have fun with your project. I would like to see the results of your endeavors if you would like to post them ... and if you need any help, feel free to e-mail me. Good luck to you! ;)

    John.
     
  5. KARmer

    KARmer New Member

    If you want to browse photos, try different languages. For example the name is "kvagga" in Finnish.