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Making a Compact Blower

Discussion in 'Tutorials' started by TROPHeTRACKER, Sep 25, 2011.

  1. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    We have put together a manual on how to build a couple different compact blowers. You may also recognize these as power blasters, air power dryer, or some other similar name.

    It it much too large to file dump here so we will refer you to our website. Click the globe and visit our HOW TO section. This is our first publication since our time has been devoted to completing Studio12 our latest taxidermy software application.

    Thank you for visiting and hope you enjoy.
     
    ace777 likes this.
  2. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    Re: Making a Compact Blower (pic added)

    Have a little time to add a picture in here for those that are interested. This is the one considered as the "Professional" model, which will cost you a little $ to complete. There is another design considered the "Free" model, which is pretty much what it cost to build.

    We don't sell any of these products or parts.

    They are for the DIY "hands-on" people. We just did all the trail and error and put together the handbook to share. Periodically, we will be adding more fun stuff we designed and created...stay tuned!

    [​IMG]
     

  3. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    The Power: First thing you will need is a few supplies. The majority of what you require can be found in the upright vacuum. Just don’t rip yours apart because there are many sources in which to obtain a FREE older carpet vacuum. First ask around to friends or family, and if that fails you can search for one at garage sales or trash day. I’ll admit I picked this one up on trash night coming home from work. They say that one man’s trash is another's treasure.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    Strip Down
    Tear down the entire vacuum and look to keep the vacuum motor, the on/off switch, the vacuum hose, and electrical cord. First we will start with the motor after having stripped down the machine. Motor sizes may vary depending on model and although I have never heard of this product “GALAXY” it worked when I plugged it in so that is enough to begin the tear down. Here’s the motor.

    [​IMG]

    Now, notice the stem shaft sticking up from the motor? Some vacuum motors have this and others don’t. It drives the belt, but there is also ten-sion from the belt. Long story short, I have heard that if this shaft gets bent at any time the motor will wind like crazy and blow apart. I don’t know how true that is, but sounds like something I’m not willing to chance?
    So let’s cut this off for security and self-assurance reasons. Safety is paramount and why risk any potential dangers?
     
  5. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    I’m fortunate to have the dremel tool and I think another alternative would be a hacksaw (metal blade), but this just zips it off very quick.
    [​IMG]
    Now finish (polish) it off. This step may not be necessary, but I like to make things nice. I used a palm sander with 80 grit paper. You could use a steel file.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    After it looks picture perfect and takes away the worry of the bent shaft.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    The Body Canister
    Again something simple and free from the bulk food section. We had some bulk nacho cheese dip and I kept the can after feeding the party. Notice the width. Motors vary in diameter with most being 5.75”. This particular motor was approximately 5.5”, but I’ll show you later how to fit smaller motors to large cans.
    [​IMG]
    Looks to be around 6.25” and that will work just fine.
     
  8. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    Let’s get this ready for paint because steel will rust over time, especially in taxidermy shops where heavy solvents and chemicals float through the air. I sprayed with some automotive primer I had on the shelf. Finished it off with a white appliance paint for the top coat.
    [​IMG]
    Then went back to work on the other parts obtained from the original vacuum.

    I cut the electrical cord down to 7’. You may want to go longer or even shorter all depending on what is your preference or distance to electrical outlet.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    The Hose
    Next cut the vacuum hose (or don’t?). I cut this hose at 4’ and would recommend 6’ because you can always cut it down later. This is non-crushable hose, but I really don’t care for it because of its inferior flexibil-ity...but it was FREE.
    Note: The hose unscrews from the couplings.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Here is the coupling that was connected to the vacuum. Notice the threads.
     
  10. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    Now turn the coupling into a nozzle. Cut off what is not needed and try to retain a cone shape. The tighter the cone, the more forced air you will get (but you don’t want it too small or it will burn up your motor). I used a jigsaw to cut this down.
    [​IMG]

    Then I followed up with the palm sander to smooth and shape the remaining edge.
    [​IMG]

    The finished product. This angle was a better choice than a straight or 90 degree cut.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    OTHER COUPLING
    You will have another coupling on the hose. Detach that coupling and prepare the can to receive this coupling. Find the center and mark it.
    I did measure this, really I did.
    [​IMG]

    Used a 1.5” metal 'circle' drill bit as pictured to the left.
    [​IMG]

    That’s it. Now ready.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    The test fit is perfect and snug.
    [​IMG]
     
  13. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    My next step was to prepare the handle. I had this aluminum handle that I acquired at a farrier shop. I know?...what the heck is a farrier shop? Well, they supply things for people that care about horses. I think they use this to make hand combs or something? Anyway, you can get a plastic or metal handle from any local hardware if you can’t find one.

    Apply zinc chromate primer to aluminum if you want it to last. Non-ferrous metals do not accept paints well and will flake or if you do not protect aluminum it will “rust” not like steel but will be pitted with heavy white residual.
    [​IMG]
     
  14. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    I top-coated with a deep rich black appliance epoxy paint. That should last long enough.
    [​IMG]
     
  15. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    THE SWITCH
    Turning my attention to the switch. Here’s what I got FREE with the GALAXY vacuum, yeah.
    Before unplugging any electrical proxies, make sure you label them (the wires) to ease placing back together if you are not electrically savvy.
    [​IMG]

    Place the switch on the can where you intend to cut. Sketch an outline of the part.
    [​IMG]

    Finish the outline where you will make the cut out.
    [​IMG]
     
  16. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    I used a carbide bit on the dremel. If you have never used this bit, be careful and start in the middle. It rips fast and can get away from you fairly quickly.
    [​IMG]

    Mine worked nice and the fit is very snug.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    Okay, I went out and bought a few things at the hardware; silicone, Loc-tite, and a few screws.

    Premium, clear, waterproof, 100% silicone
    [​IMG]

    I got the BLUE Loctite which means you can remove the screw later in life with a little effort. RED Loctite is forever to stay.
    [​IMG]

    Apply to acorn nuts used on top handle.
    [​IMG]
     
  18. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    Apply silicone to handle. Flat meets round equals wobble. The silicone will help resolve this issue.
    [​IMG]

    Hit the coupling with silicone all the way around.
    [​IMG]

    Don’t forget the on/off toggle switch.
    [​IMG]

    Then generously coat the inside after you installed all the fittings to the can and let it dry for an hour or more.
    [​IMG]
     
  19. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    Close up of the handle with the acorn nuts installed.
    [​IMG]
     
  20. TROPHeTRACKER

    TROPHeTRACKER Studio12v - Taxidermy Small Business Software

    THE LEGS
    To stabilize the can we use furniture cabinet handles as the feet. These can be purchased super cheap (under $1 each) just look for the ones they want to get rid of (close-outs).
    [​IMG]

    Cut the screw down using the dremel or hacksaw.
    [​IMG]

    Drill a hole in the can, apply the Loctite, and screw together. It will screw together very tight. Repeat for all 4 legs.
    [​IMG]