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Tine Repair - My quick painting method

Discussion in 'Tutorials' started by Cole, Dec 23, 2011.

  1. Cole

    Cole Amateur Taxidermist

    Yes, the paint is MUCH thinner than that on canvas. They can take a bit to dry, but usually overnight is sufficient.
     

  2. DROPPINEM

    DROPPINEM New Member

    Marking
     
  3. ortegageno

    ortegageno Active Member

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    Dang it, I should have looked here for a tutorial before I started my project. Had to create the entire side of mule deer rack. All 56" worth and I used acrylics and it was a pain in the tail. I don't know how many different applications I tried to get the colors to match. Finally got it to look pretty close but next time I will use oils.
    Regards, Geno
     
  4. Just like you, I tried paints(not these) and they were a pain, then stain, it didn't do anything good.

    Then I thought, what make antlers brown... dirt.

    So while my white apoxie sculpt was still soft, I went and got some of the rich dirt that is under the juniper trees. I then mixed the dirt with some gloss top coat and water and brushed that on the soft sculpt, then I rubbed on just the dry dirt by itself and it was closer to the rest of the rack than anything I had done before.

    It still isn't perfect, but if I mess around with it some more I might get it just right.

    At least, that is what's working for me... use at your own risk ;)
     
  5. eliscull

    eliscull Nov. 2011

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    nice
     
  6. marking, this is fantastic :D
     
  7. Srgrinder1

    Srgrinder1 New Member

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    marking
     
  8. JimRollins

    JimRollins New Member

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    Marked
     
  9. One of the most helpful tutorials on here. I used to send my racks out for repairs. Now I do them myself! Just repaired 4 tines on a 190 incher yesterday including a 8 inch drop tine. Thanks Cole!

    Bruce
     
  10. cmt

    cmt New Member

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    Marking
     
  11. TIMBUCK

    TIMBUCK Active Member

    pretty dang good right there..
     
  12. pizzo68

    pizzo68 New Member

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    Looks great!!
     
  13. WILD_BUNCH

    WILD_BUNCH New Member

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    great tutorial
     
  14. dmac1175

    dmac1175 Active Member

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    Thank you for this tutorial. I used it this week and was extremely satisfied with results on a bleached out mule deer rack.
     
    Cole likes this.
  15. jimss

    jimss Active Member

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    Great post! Paint obviously works well.

    I started off using this technique and refined it a bit with my own. I've had good luck using water color pencils rather than paint. It's pretty easy to rub them off if you don't get the affect you want. In fact, I often use different weight steel wool when building layers. The combination of water color pencils plus super light coats of minwax stains work great for darker applications near the bases or other antlers (like elk) that often have darker antlers. The trick is to go super light on coats and not to over-do it. The more light coats and layers that are built the better. I use the same method used for building layers on fish reproductions. Anyway, it may be worth experimenting a bit. Each antler is a little different.

    From my experience shed hunting, each area of the country often have different colored antlers depending upon what the animals rub their antlers on. The more contrasting colors you can add that are similar to the natural colors of antlers for a particular area the more natural they will look.