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Moths or slippage ?

Discussion in 'Deer and Gameheads' started by MAC1, Dec 31, 2011.

  1. MAC1

    MAC1 Member

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    I have a mount that is six years old. When I cleaned it this past summer I noticed I had some bald spots on my mount. I looked up some things on moths and beetles , but didn't think that was the case. I was thinking it might have been slippage all this time. I never found any moths but I did see some strands of white that looked like the root of the hair. I found some spots today that are concerning me. I have one small bald spot on both sides of the deer's head that are the size of a pea. One is below the eye and the other is to the back of it. They have no thick white strands like I have found in other areas of this mount. Some places I find the white strands, doesn't seem to be missing hair. It almost looks like dried fat . I have some pretty big bald spots on the shoulder of the deer. When I pull the hair back there is nothing but form under neath it about the size of a quarter. I can cover most of it up with the hair from around it, but I am concerned about it being a Moth or Beatle and getting worse. I kind of remember having a small area there when I first picked it up. I don't know if I have made it worse by picking at it or if I have bugs. Does anyone have any pictures of what the larva or roots of hair will look like with this problem? I have read they look like rice crispies, but the white strands I have found the most find are pretty skinny and long. I also don't recall any moths flying around or any clothes that were damaged.
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  2. Team NWTF

    Team NWTF Life is short, serve GOD!

    It looks like it could be an area where there was a scab on the cape and it came lose. Did you or someone esle mount it?
     

  3. MAC1

    MAC1 Member

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    Someone else.
     
  4. Mac is right those two areas are injuries. You should give every mount just a very very light mist of bug spray every month.
     
  5. MAC1

    MAC1 Member

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    So what about the small white hard strands of dried substance I am finding in the hair in many other spots ?

    What kind of damage?
     
  6. MAC1

    MAC1 Member

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    I don't have big clumps of hair falling out, though I am not sure if the hard white strands I am finding in the hair is larva or what is left from it?
     
  7. Oak Leaf

    Oak Leaf New Member

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    I am probably wrong....

    But to me, it looks like where holes were repaired and now they've re-opened. The hair sort of looks cut around the openings.

    Or like Team NWTF said, scabs that came undone. An injury would make the hair appear cut as well.

    And think about this....if you see nothing but "form" underneath, the hair is not just slipping, the skin is gone. Where'd the skin go? Dissolve? Get Eaten? Was never there?

    Could that be bugs? I have no idea, I haven't been in taxidermy long enough to know the effects of age, bugs, etc...I would assume they could eat a hole.

    Bugs, repairs that came undone or scars that opened up. Hopefully someone can give a definitive answer on what and why.

    Can you show pictures of the small white hard strands your finding?
     
  8. MAC1

    MAC1 Member

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    Thanks for your reply. I have some in the bottom picture laying on top of the calculator that is turned over. I am not at home or I would take some more.
     
  9. brokentine

    brokentine New Member

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    Well being a exterminator and part time taxidermist I thought I should chime in. The spot that you are seeing looks to me to be a bald spot, that could be from some slippage at some point and time. It is however not a bug issue. The majority of the time when dealing with clothes moths, tent moths, and linnen moths you will not see the insect. However, you would see the eggs with the naked eye. Locations to look would be under the shoulder pits of the mount, ears, and where the cape meets the wall. They seem to really hide in the tucked dry skin that is stapled in the back of the mount. Beetles and moths can be very destructive as I have seen in many african mounts. Treating once a month by a professional can be worth every penny in gold, as once an insect is found it may be weeks to months and they will take over and entire collection of a lifes worth of hunting.
     
  10. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    The hair can be brittle, a bump by anything can bust a flock of hair off.