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smallmouth repo question

Discussion in 'Fish Taxidermy' started by jvan, Jan 29, 2012.

  1. jvan

    jvan Member

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    ma
    gary bruch referes to a skin blend he makes in his break through article. any idea what this blend is. Looks like a darker browns,greenish color.
     
  2. JL

    JL Taxidermist for 64 years

    Why not just call Gary and get his answer to your question?
     

  3. GBRUCH

    GBRUCH "I am nothing without christ".....John 15:5

    Skin blend is the color of the dried skin tones (scale pocket color) of the fish skin if it were used. It is used to blend apoxie work and or detail/antique the replica and then it will subsequently lightened if need be.

    I always tone over my blend/antiquing colors

    The colors used for a smallmouth is diver grey for some opacity and some brown(black or raw umber) and a lil black if need be. You must remember that yellow over brown results in a shade of green so if the fish is not to be green than be sure to go light on the coloration of the blend and tone it back with a wash of white.
     
  4. jvan

    jvan Member

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    ma
    thank you for the rply gary. I will post pics when done.
     
  5. millardtaxi

    millardtaxi JOHN 3:3

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    your the man gary, always wiling to help.
     
  6. Harum

    Harum Active Member

    Why would you want a replica to look like a dried skin mount before painting?

    If you must antique the replica to aid in your painting then use the colors found in the actual derma layer of live fish not dead dried fish.
    A good trick for finding that base color would be to open a digital picture in Microsoft paint, use the pick color tool (eye dropper) and click on a base color between the scales, Change to the brush tool and paint in a solid area large enough to get an understanding of the color you will need to duplicate. In my experience there will be multiple base colors from front to back and top to bottom, on any given fish. If you find it difficult to match the color, it is time for you to buy a color wheel and maybe a book on color mixing.

    -Pete
     
  7. GBRUCH

    GBRUCH "I am nothing without christ".....John 15:5

    I assume the question you pose is directed to me so I will answer you.

    I paint all my fish the same and since my start came from painting skin mounts I adapted from that. My fish all start at the same basic place-a fish that has basic light and dark toning in areas to detail. The colors I use to do this are based off the end product I am looking for. Skin mounts are also adjusted to this detailed place as well. I than airbrush layers over the fish to achieve the actual color I want.

    Maybe it is the long way around but it works for me.
     
  8. Harum

    Harum Active Member

    Actually Gary my question, reason for the question and tip were directed towards the original post. I felt he could use the information to better understand the use of contrast and to possibly open his eyes towards the depiction of life not death.

    If you want to continue using a wash to depict the appearance of a dried skin, more power to you, however, here are some tips for you to consider. The term you used as opacity is actually called hue and white is much more effective in changing the hue rather than grey. In fact, it is the white in the grey that is changing the hue. When you add yellow over your brown mixture it is the addition of black and grey that produces the green that you are seeing. A neutral brown will not turn yellow green. If you do end up with the green saturation, you are speaking of, just add a translucent red over the top and you will end up with a brown/green that will change from light source to light source (very nice effect on a Smallmouth).

    -Pete
     
  9. jvan

    jvan Member

    135
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    ma
    Thanks Harum for the reply. I am struggling with the blends and bleeding to get the color thatI am looking for. I was using gary's paint schedule from the 07 breakthrough mag.
     
  10. GBRUCH

    GBRUCH "I am nothing without christ".....John 15:5

    I guess since the op never mentioned dried skin tones but mine did I must have got a bit confused and thought you were asking me about it?-sorry.

    Your right red over a green is a nice effect- I often use a thinned sienna or magenta to get the affect you speak of on smallies and largemouths.
     
  11. Harum

    Harum Active Member

    jvan,

    The skin blend color and subsequent washes have been used by many in this trade. What then happens is the Taxidermist must blend colors on top and around this dried skin look to achieve something that doesn't look like a dried skin… Imagine how effective the process would be if the Taxidermist started with the actual base color of a living fish.
    For your blending of colors, try adding a bit of color to clear. You want the color to be translucent (see through) so each layer will create a gradual change. This will help you to keep from having those extreme changes in color. You do not need to use a heavy coat. The idea is to use thin layers to slowly dial in your desired color. As I mentioned before a color wheel is an effective tool for understanding these color changes. All art supply stores carry them. On a side note, what a color wheel will not tell you is how dramatic the changes are when using white and black. You must use these in small amounts when attempting to change colors. Well, just keep that in mind anyhow.

    Best of luck,

    -Pete