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Skull of the week 7-2

Discussion in 'Skulls and Skeletons' started by skullclnr, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,647
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    I hope skulls that are set up for sculpting are eligible for this section. If so, then I have a few ... My collection consists of purchased skulls, skulls that I have cleaned, and reproduction skulls purchased from Skulls Unlimited, for specimens I want in my collection, but just cannot locate in the real bone. These repros are not junk ... they are as accurate as you could want! I have also recently acquired an actual skeleton of an African Wildcat! The story of his journey through USFW is one for the ages ... with a very happy ending!

    But first is my Vervet Monkey skull.
    [​IMG]
    This Vervet Monkey skull will be used in an original clay model for a lifesize mannikin. The 'eyes' were made using ¾-inch wooden rounds - balls - with holes drilled in them to accept 12ᵐᵐ Tohickon Feather-Banded Brown Bird Eyes. They are set in a bed of Kleen Klay to establish the proper seating depth. It sort of reminds me of Jeff Dunham's puppet 'Achmed the Dead Terrorist' ... "I kill you!"
    [​IMG]
    While these wooden eyes will suffice for modeling the clay model, I am working on a Silicone mold for the eye 'capsules' to hold the glass eyes for the actual mount. These can then be detailed with veins and such. Or ... I can just order a set of Tohickon White Banded Eyes for Vervet Monkeys, and save myself the time and headaches! LOL!
     
  2. wbd

    wbd Member

    John, how do you go about the recreation of the muscles, etc? Do you use dissection photos or something or just general anatomy/muscles?
     

  3. kikkertinz

    kikkertinz Glass half full

    whitetailslayer that is a very cool way to display that!!
     
  4. hoytman

    hoytman UTA Member

    Customer Dall Sheep Euro on a walnut hallow Panel.

    Hoytman
     

    Attached Files:

  5. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,647
    147
    Ohio
    Many things combine into an accurate clay model. I do have anatomical studies of skinned monkey carcasses, such as this one of the muscles of the hind leg and hip ...
    [​IMG]

    Also, anatomical diagrams; and then my gained knowledge of mammalian anatomicals ... bone structure, muscle placement, biomechanics, and what not. I also have references from the Monkeys and Apes I have skinned in the past ... contact sketches, and some photos. Plus ... I research the chit out of these things, so I am prepared to move ahead on a piece.


    If I do not have an actual skeleton, I can now carve the bones I need ... pelvis, and all leg and/or arm bones. I recently completed a set of 'bones' for an African Wildcat armature ... the pelvis, front and rear leg 'bones' were power carved from Basswood. And I am no wood carver. Not by any stretch of the imagination. The actual African Wildcat skull was one from my collection.
    [​IMG]

    Here she is with some of her clay anatomy in place ... still unfinished.
    [​IMG]

    But as long as you have a skull - the hardest structure to replicate, though not impossible - you have a good part of the battle won! ;)
     
  6. skullclnr

    skullclnr Active Member

    Cool stuff guys, John, thats some talent there. Hoytman, love the sheep. Just delivered a 180 big horn today, I love when guys have the kahonas to do a euro on a sheep!
     
  7. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Well-Known Member

    Carving a wooden skeleton. Not only has that been something I never thought of, it looks like you did a good job on just those few bones too. John, have you ever tried to do an entire skeleton of wood?
     
  8. Bighorn on a Juniper plaque...
     

    Attached Files:

  9. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

    5,647
    147
    Ohio
    INTERESTING plaque there, Tim! Damn, if that lighter section doesn't look like a small rifle with a bent barrel!

    Thank you! I did think of creating the rib cage and spinal processes ... but opted not to, as this thing may have NEVER gotten off the ground! LOL! I've known about carving 'bones' from wood through the writings of Leon L. Pray, and John Rowley for a long time now. Pray said "they needn't be elaborate affairs" ... and Rowley reccommended to "make them as true as possible". When I started I figured the best way to get correct muscle structure and tone, was to make them as true as possible, and so I did. It was time consuming, but rewarding at the same time. Still, I wouldn't want to do this every time! The Dremel Motor Tool gets HOT working with it for extended periods! ;) ;D