1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

Wrinkles

Discussion in 'Deer and Gameheads' started by Bowhunter Nap, Jul 23, 2012.

  1. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,082
    1,847
    MN
    Me too J brown II, been there done that. I do understand why we use clay and elephant snot to help in making wrinkles look good. My question is, why is it totally wrong to carve them into the form as detail, just like any other detail we add to the forms to make them match the look we are after? Are you not adding girth when you only put clay or snot over the form? I use a combination of both, carving them in the foam allows me to see the wrinkles and adjust as I see needed. I then use clay when mounting to smooth out the wrinkles some so they are more rounded and look more natural. Is this the only way? No, but it is the way I use to achieve the look I am after and I believe it works. I can only give advice on what I have used and what has worked or not worked for me. 3bears
     
  2. Bowhunter Nap

    Bowhunter Nap New Member

    35
    0
    so the wrinkles that are on the form I carve those out the part that sticks about the form not the indention and then add clay and elephant snot....... is this correct.
     

  3. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,082
    1,847
    MN
    When you have a form that has wrinkles in the neck portion like in a hard turn, just take a file or some other rasp to deepen the indents. Be careful to not overdo it. Trial and error are your best teachers here, because only you know the exact look you are going for. Follow reference for the most natural look. I then use critter clay when mounting to soften the wrinkles some, so they look not so harsh, if that makes sense? As I said northern deer with winter hair aren't going to show much for wrinkles, if any. 3bears
     
  4. Bowhunter Nap

    Bowhunter Nap New Member

    35
    0
    ok I see thank you
     
  5. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    The "wrinkles" on the forms are simply the striations of the muscle groups in the neck. Those ancient Texas whitetails with dewlaps, do you see THAT on the form? Again, the form is simply an ARMATURE, nothing more. Just like you see Dennis Harris make snarls or hyenas with zebra legs in their mouths, the skin is a separate and distinct organ.

    As was said earlier, the early season/southern tier deer may get some embellishments with the skin, but the big Canadian and northern tier WINTER whitetails don't. If you've hunted them you'll see that their skin is not as flacid (GEEZ, you mean they schrink up in the cold weather? YES!!!!) and the hair wil layer instead of folding up.

    If you want to cut and grind your form, who am I to say it's "wrong". I'm just saying it's not correct.
     
  6. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,082
    1,847
    MN
    George, I have killed deer as late as December here in northern MN so I have hunted northern winter deer. I understand what you are saying about the striations in muscle groups. On the average deer mount I do there is no reason to embellish those at all. But on a form such as a grooming buck with a severe turn they are going to be there and carving them into the form works well and is needed to have a place to taxi that skin to, no different than cutting deeper pits into a lifesize form or as I do on deer shoulder forms to tuck skin into. I never said I disagreed with the method you provided, I just gave an example of a different method. To the original poster try them both and see what works for you, but follow reference. 3bears