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Help with burn through on duck

Discussion in 'Bird Taxidermy' started by Hill Country Taxidermy, Feb 16, 2013.

  1. Well after doing game heads for 10 years I thought it would be time to try waterfowl. I managed to burn at leat eight dime sized holes in my wigeon on the wire wheel flesher and am so frustrated I considered throwing it against the wall. Can I superglue a dryer sheet over these holes? How do you guys deal with these problems? Any help would be appreciated...
     
  2. finazducks

    finazducks EJ is not the only one to have two Wasco Awards

    A couple of stitches in each hole should do it
     

  3. I did the same thing many times, some time I would sew other times I would glue it. To prevent it I now have 3 wheels on my bird flesher it makes it wider and is not such a small area so it does not burn thru as easy.
     
  4. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Excellent advice. The single wheel is not your friend.
     
  5. Rick RR GBirds

    Rick RR GBirds Let's go kill some birds...I'm psyched!

    Wire wheel technique is probably the main issue. Make sure you are wire wheeling with the quills and not against. If you have a good wheel this will take care of 95% of the problem.
     
  6. duxrus

    duxrus Active Member

    Next go around you might wetting down the skin with some Dawn before wheeling. It seems to "lube" it up enough to lessen the friction yet allows for a good cleaning with less burn throughs. It also helps with reducing flying goo as the Dawn foams up.
     
  7. Sounds like to me if you burning holes in the skin you leaving the skin on the wire wheel to long in one place, gotta say i have never burned a hole in the skin of a bird not saying i haven't lost a few with the wheel taking them out of my hand lol!! take your time patience and after couple hundred birds i promise it gets better, try putting borax on your skin before fleshing makes it bite more and it works better for me. Good luck!!
     
  8. Thanks for all the good advice fellas...this one was a lost cause, but I'll try again soon on a spoonie I have. I'll post pics when I do!
     
  9. Spoonie? lol, might be the thinnest of all the skins? Well at least it's right up there with the mallard and the wood duck. There are many different techniques to wheeling a skin. I wheel mine wet (certainly doesn't mean the only way). After I skin the bird, I wash all the blood off the bird, in water and dawn dish soap. I do as Duxrus, and wheel it soapy wet. Keep the skin moving. Don't stay in one spot, even if you haven't removed all the fat, just keep sweeping the area, until it's gone. I like to start at the head. This takes the membrane equation out of the mix. As you start at the head, it eliminates those strings of membrane that want to wrap around the wheel, because the membrane is being removed as you go. This also keeps you in the feather tracts, working with the grain of the quills. Sometimes small relief cuts cut with a very sharp scalpel will help open this membrane up (shallow cuts only through the membrane), and allow you to flesh fat with less work involved.