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Ph meter?

Discussion in 'Tanning' started by tmoos111, Feb 20, 2013.

  1. tmoos111

    tmoos111 Member

    Just wondering if anyone has used any of the ph meters? I have seen them from 10.00 to 200.00. I'm thinking if they are good it wouldn't take long to pay for one. If u have any input I would like to hear it. Thanks Travis
     
  2. tuckertan

    tuckertan New Member

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    you mean 10$-200$???? i have one that cost 180$ and it works great, calibrate it and you can test exactly the pH.. test solutions before hides go in, and as they're in the pickle..
     

  3. tmoos111

    tmoos111 Member

    yes tucker I was on amazon and seen them range from $10 to $200. Can I ask what brand and model you have ? I just want to make sure I get a good one
     
  4. tuckertan

    tuckertan New Member

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    i've used a lot of different models.. this one is really good, and has other useful tools..

    http://www.amazon.ca/Tri-Meter-Nutrient-Temperature-Fahrenheit-operation/dp/B00AKL32XG/ref=sr_1_31?ie=UTF8&qid=1361696159&sr=8-31
     
  5. tuckertan

    tuckertan New Member

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    i have also used this one for years and it worked great: http://www.amazon.ca/Neewer-pH-009-Meter-Digital-Tester/dp/B005DWGR20/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1361731382&sr=8-3

    i also wanted to mention that you do have to take care of them, and clean them for the permeable membrane to not get clogged, which causes the read outs to take longer, or eventually to not work at all.. so when you do get a pH meter, always keep the probe submerged in a #4 calibration solution. i did actually ruin one of my pH meter by not doing such things.
     
  6. RTF

    RTF Active Member

    I use the meters continuously and have been for some time. I also always keep a roll of pH paper on the shelf if I ever want to second guess the meter. the keey with the meters is to keep them maintained and calibrated. ALWAY have at least 2 pH solutions on hand to test your meter. I have believe it or not had pH paper go bad on me and wasn't turning to the right color when dipped. Ive only had that happen once in a decade so it's pretty rare.
     
  7. tuckertan

    tuckertan New Member

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    as a piece of scientific equipment, pH meters have been engineered to give accurate results, if calibrated properly, and taken care of.

    Hudson, what do you use to test your pickles to keep them under pH 3.0, and when you do EZ-100 tanning?

    my understanding is that optimal pH for a hide is slightly more acidic in the middle of the hide compared to the surface, because the EZ-100 will go to a slightly more acid place first, causing deeper penetration. the solution of EZ-100 works best at pH 4.0. what do you use to measure those figures?

    pH meters are way more reliable then pH paper. the way the papers work is by soaking and drying paper with different indicators: which have a shelf life it not taken care of properly, and they do get affected by ambient humidity and oxidization.

    pH Indicator
    1.2-2.8 Thymol blue
    3.0-4.6 Brom phenol blue
    4.4-6.0 Methylred
    5.2-6.8 Brom cresol purple
    6.0-7.6 Brom thymopl blue
    6.8-8.4 Phenol red
    7.2-8.8 Cresol red
    8.0-9.6 Thymol blue
    8.2-9.8 cresik phthalein

    obviously not all of them are used in the typical test strips that you get.. and you can tell that their ranges are so large. pH is an exponential system, so for every point it's to the power of 10. so to have that much variance seems not as reliable as an exact figure from a tool that is meant to read precisely the pH of a solution, when calibrated properly.

    any thoughts? i'm not entirely sure if everything that i said is correct, and i'm always interested in learning new more reliable ways to tan. most of the information came out of text books, and instructions.

    thanks!
     
  8. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001


     
  9. tuckertan

    tuckertan New Member

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    well put! thanks for the clarification.
     
  10. tuckertan

    tuckertan New Member

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    i can understand where you're coming from and why you think it's funny, though i see it equally as funny as to your opinion and lack of use of a reliable simple tool such as a pH meter. when according to the chart i posted about pH indicator chemicals and their reactive pH levels, shows that your pH strips display a range of pH and not the exact pH..

    and in terms of avoiding chemicals, or wanting to do things naturally in concerns of the environment and waste solutions from tanning, a pH meter when put into a solution doesn't have any chemical reaction with the solutions whatsoever or the hide. there is no correlation between natural tanning, and the use of scientific equipment. the guy that used a moisture meter, was probably referring to all the chemicals you use.

    using tools to measure aspects of tanning to ensure good results, as well as the process of 'over thinking' or to be more exact, learning the depths of the chemistry of tanning, allow for refining and getting consistent results. i do concern a lot of what i'm interested in when it comes to tanning with the primitive aspects of the process, but knowing that there are tools available that do not chemically alter hides negatively, like a pH meter or a moisture meter, are worth having around to test solutions and hides appropriately. and what are you using your compass for, to make sure that the hide is facing north??... LOL!!!!! even though you calculate everything by weight and follow formulas, doesn't mean that you have a stable pH, i check my pH in all my solutions once every two-three days, and adjust the solutions according to the results from the test.

    i guess some of us are interested in exploring things a bit deeper when it comes to tanning, and using modern tools with natural tanning. while others, like yourself, would much rather use a primitive tool like pH strips and a compass to tan your modern hides... LOL....

    what exactly do you do with your compass in your tanning process?? i usually just bring mine on camping trips, i didn't realize a compass had a place in a tannery..

    thanks for the good laughs!
     
  11. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    There is most definitely a chemical reaction occurring when you use a pH meter.

    In my opinion a pH meter is overkill for the home taxidermy/tanning industry .

    There are interferences possible which could skew the actual reading. Protein interactions being one of them..

    For those who want to get really picky and want the highest of accuracy, why not go the time tested route of titration? Break out the old buret and drip away.

    As for the compass, perhaps Hudson wants to draw circles...

    More than likely he, like myself, refuses to trust a GPS. I believe he made a nice analogy when he stated that they are nice tools but one should carry a magnetic analog compass and a topo map as a backup. Even the GPS manufacturers tell you that. They are nice but what happens when the batteries go?

    In as much as pH meters are wonderful tools, have one if you must but have pH strips as your backup.
     
  12. tuckertan

    tuckertan New Member

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    fair enough, i can understand that..

    tell me more about titration. what is the process??
     
  13. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIiQce07u2o
     
  14. tuckertan

    tuckertan New Member

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    i can understand Hudson, i think i just took offense for some reason.. i find that i immerse myself so deeply in things that i forget about the simplicity.. my mind creates so many questions, and finding answers is hard.. especially living in the middle of nowhere with no mentors to learn from. i'm the only person in my area that is tanning right now, some people brain tan a hide once a year, and i'm trying to do a lot more.. i am limited by the size of my tannery though...

    sorry taking things a bit too far this time!
     
  15. tuckertan

    tuckertan New Member

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    i've been looking for some phenolphthalein, and found some recently, i just have to order it.. i read that it's good to use a drop on a hide to test for alkalinity in the actually hide.. make a small cut and drop some in, if it's clear you're good to move onto the next step, if pink, put the hide back to rinse or bate and drench it.. Cyclone, i put a posting about deliming, do you happen to know anything about the bating, and drenching procedure? perhaps you could answer in the thread i started..
     
  16. cyclone

    cyclone Posts: 400001

    Phenolphthalein is going to be colorless at low pH, purplish at high pH and, just about at a pH of 7, it will turn a solution a light pink color. So with the method that you posted "clear" can mean that the pH of the hide is anywhere from below 7 to a pH of 1 or less. Pink could mean neutral to whatever you perceive as "pink" and shades thereof..up to a pH that would be considered destructive to hides..

    Other, perhaps interesting, phenolphthalein facts:

    It is the active ingredient in some laxatives...i.e. Exlax
    It is the main ingredient in some dog worming treatments.