1. Welcome to Taxidermy.net, Guest!
    We have put together a brief tutorial to help you with the site, click here to access it.

Dorsal Incision vs Ventral Incision

Discussion in 'Bird Taxidermy' started by mulieslayer52, Feb 28, 2013.

  1. mulieslayer52

    mulieslayer52 New Member

    31
    0
    The next project for me is a Canada Goose (pretty big one). I want to mount it hanging from the ceiling. I was wondering if its just as hard to do a dorsal incision to skin it versus a ventral. I would be hoping to not have some ruffed up feathers visible from a ventral incision


    Thanks,
    Keenan
     
  2. Adam Edwards

    Adam Edwards Member

    264
    1
    Utah
    I have only ever done ventral incisions, if you degrease the bird properly, and dry the down and feathers completely its covers up your incision extremely well. Good luck
     

  3. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,249
    2,121
    MN
    Wet the feathers down the breast, part them with whatever is handy, make incission skin as usual. When sewing keep feathers out of stitches.
     
  4. TWinter

    TWinter Winter taxidermy

    have never done a dorsal incision, x2 on everything stated.
     
  5. brazosboyt

    brazosboyt Member

    561
    3
    I have skinned several birds down the back. The back skin seems to be tougher and less likely to tear. Haven't mounted either bird. Both are mallards to be done belly out.
     
  6. wolfgang

    wolfgang New Member

    747
    1
    I skin 99% of all birds between the shoulder blades. Once you get use to it there is no better way, they practically mount themselves.
     
  7. Jim McNamara

    Jim McNamara Well-Known Member

    1,797
    265
    Ok, I am curious, where between the shoulder blades do you cut. From shoulder to shoulder, straight down the back through the feather tract or some other way? I would really like to try this method once just to see how it goes.
    Thank you, Jim
     
  8. wolfgang

    wolfgang New Member

    747
    1
    Here is a picture I took for a tutorial a while ago.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,249
    2,121
    MN
    Wolfgang, Is the tutorial posted up in that section?
     
  10. wolfgang

    wolfgang New Member

    747
    1
    No, Sorry it was one I did for a couple of other members that had asked.
    If I can find all the pictures I will post up the entire process, mounting included.
     
  11. I just mounted my first goose and did the "armpit skinning" Wingman had the tutorial on. http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php/topic,254631.0.html
    Very easy and loved the final results. I'm intrigued by Wolfgang's method as I wondered about doing it that way when I was in the middle of wiring the goose. Just wasn't sure how well that back skin would hold/hide stitches. May be trying it now...
    Here's the goose, did it just like Wingman's tutorial.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

    6,249
    2,121
    MN
    I for one would appreciate it wolfgang. I have thought about it but have never wanted to try it on a customer mount. I never seem to get time to work on my own. Also every bird I have is already skinned ventraly.
     
  13. CR

    CR New Member

    222
    0
    me to wolfgang!!!! Now this is just plain fun!!!!!!!!!!!11
     
  14. Ranger8292

    Ranger8292 New Member

    43
    0
    I woud Deffinatley Be Interested in seeing the rest of tat tutorial
     
  15. Adam Edwards

    Adam Edwards Member

    264
    1
    Utah
    X2
     
  16. Capercaillie

    Capercaillie New Member

    265
    0
    I have done a ventral incision for the last fifteen years, but ive just started to do a dorsal on all my wildfowl and find it far better!
     
  17. BeckyBird

    BeckyBird My Baby Bluebirds

    1,394
    1
    I love to try new ways of skinning. Thanks to this forum, I've tried the armpit method, and the leg to leg method. I did try a dorsal incision on a goose years ago, but I didn't like it. However, it might be time to try again, maybe on a duck this time. Thanks for the pictures!