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Homemade bird flesher

Discussion in 'Bird Taxidermy' started by WHITTAX, Mar 10, 2013.

  1. WHITTAX

    WHITTAX New Member

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    Homemade bird flesher
     

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  2. RichMO

    RichMO Well-Known Member

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    Looks good.... Got any information on the motor (size, type, fan cooled?)
     

  3. NOW THAT IS FANCY looks great I may make some modifiation to mine.Thanks for posting
     
  4. B Jones

    B Jones Memeber of - NTA,UTA,AIT.Proud Member of NZTA.

    Looks good for small birds, I would hate to try getting a goose or turkey in to the wheel.
     
  5. socalmountainman

    socalmountainman Northwestern School of Taxidermy - Class of '73

    Taxidermists are the best fabricators in the world. We have to be to tackle the job of recreating wildlife. Every job is new and has it's own challenges. We are the most "mechanically enclined", up there with the welders and the auto-body masters. This is my bird flesher. It is made from a plastic serving tray used in catering. IThis one measures 14X24X4.5 and is really easy to wipe down and clean.The motor is actually a dual wheel grinder from Harbor Freight. The other side still has a grinding wheel for sharpening my leg and wing wires. They have many to choose from, I paid about $35 for this one but study the HP and RPM's when choosing one for a flesher.
     

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  7. B Jones

    B Jones Memeber of - NTA,UTA,AIT.Proud Member of NZTA.

    Feather i like that concept. I see the plywood barrier have you thought about a small piece of plexiglass to help with your line of sight?
     
  8. ddhix

    ddhix New Member

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    Socalmountainman,

    Please don't take any offense. I just loved reading your post about taxidermists being the best fabricators in the world. I like it when people have a lot of pride in what they do. So I just had to post back at ya with mine.

    I'm a clockmaker and watchmaker. I'm sorry man, but we're the best fabricators in the world. We have to tackle keeping time using gears, pivots, bushings, springs, weights, fusee, rivets, clicks, gongs, chimes, cuckoos, automata, and miserable clocks that won't keep time. Every job is new and has it's own challenges. We are definitely the most mechanically inclined.

    I think we both far surpass welders, and most auto-body masters. Too many guys in those trades for it to be that amazing.

    Sorry this is my first post. I really came here because I wanted to try my hand at some hobbyist bird taxidermy to decorate my clock bench with. Lots of good reading so far. Thank y'all.

    All in good fun,
    -ddhix

     
  9. Ed Rollins

    Ed Rollins New Member

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    Texas
    Socalmountain..I like that..may do one just like that..thanks for the idea
     
  10. socalmountainman

    socalmountainman Northwestern School of Taxidermy - Class of '73

    Thanks but do what RJ did in the First post, don't center the tray like I did. Mount it higher up so you have more room for your hands under the wheel. I mostly do ducks and smaller with this one. I could never get a goose or turkey in there. I'll have to redo it. It is funny how all our fleshers use the same basic concept though.
     
  11. Ed Rollins

    Ed Rollins New Member

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    Texas
    Okay...I will consider that.As you can see I have been on here for awhile but don't comment much because I don't know enough about taxidermy. This year will be my first year to do any ducks.I have just been mainly reading and learning from you guys..
     
  12. Socialmountainman ;
    I was at harbor freight today looking at the bench grinders. Which one is the better to get, as far as hp and the size. They had a little 3 1/2 or 4 inch all the way up to ten inch I think. I was looking at the 6 inch one but wasn't sure if the revolutions were to fast or not fast enough. Thanks for any input.
    Howie
     
  13. socalmountainman

    socalmountainman Northwestern School of Taxidermy - Class of '73

    Hey Jimbo, I have the six inch grinder and it spins at 3450 rpms. I bought it for sharpening leg and wing wires and such, my old grinder finally gave out. I had been planning on buying a flesher and thought I would try my grinder since it was $200 less. I tried on a couple of chicken skins I had and after a few minutes I had "the touch". I ended up doing a Pintail for a customer and it worked fine for me. The flesher motors are around 1500 rpms and I have never used one so I can't tell you what the advantages are. I'm sure you can put just as many holes in a skin with either speed if you don't practice first. I'll be doing a turkey and a couple of roosters next. I have other wire wheels I bought from Harbor Freight that I want to try as well; brass vs steel, etc.
     
  14. CH_Taxidermy

    CH_Taxidermy New Member

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    Do you have plans for this flesher?
     
  15. lapoisse

    lapoisse Active Member

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    France
    here is one of my colleagues make and lends me, while waiting for me to make one : )

    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
     
  16. twinrivers

    twinrivers Active Member

    Nice work everyone!!
     
  17. hambone

    hambone Well-Known Member

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    46
    I use a rectangle shaped plastic tub set back from the edge of the table so I can rest my forearms on the table, believe me having your arms stable really helps keeping from getting the skin tangled up in the wheel, I also use double wheels, works good for me