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Janelli / Outlook

Discussion in 'Taxidermy History' started by Richard C, May 22, 2007.

  1. Richard C

    Richard C Well-Known Member

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    John
    I just got my new Outlook ,(Wolf in cover). You did another great article on John Hansen and the history of taxidermy, .thank you. I really enjoy these type of articles . May I suggest a article on taxidermist Fred Huber of Jersey. Fifty years ago he did the best skin mount Striped Bass on the East coast , the mounting and painting. He had it perfected for that point in time. I still have one of his mounts. Also don't forget to do a story on the P+Y convention in Lancaster,PA that we both attended. Include in the article a photo of the "take apart" lifesize Moose.
    My suggestion is write more articles and talk less because you seem to pi$$ me off when you get talking too much.
    Ciao
     
  2. John Janelli

    John Janelli New Member

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    Richard, thanks for your support and encouragement with my writing abilities. Now can you please tell Tony I never went to college to learn how to write like that. Seriously, I thought the same of Craig Lewis' well written article about his African hunt. Ernest Hemingway once said that a writer should never speak. Of course this doesn't apply to everyone as you'll soon find out when you hear the guest speaker at the banquet that you promised me $100.00 to help pay for. Or did you want separate checks for that too? LOL! By the way, stop complaining about me talking too much. You saw first hand how I can get things done for the NTA so cut me some slack huh goomba!
     

  3. Richard C

    Richard C Well-Known Member

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    John
    OK you can have slack soon as you do the Huber or P+Y article. That was 50 not 100 , you getting premature dementia.
     
  4. John Janelli

    John Janelli New Member

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    Relax pisano. For $50.00 you only get half the articles and no calamari or linguine when you come down to see me. For $100.00 you get all that and even a canoli too! You keep bustin' my chops like this and I'll send my cousin Vinny after you. Sorry, Jo Jo is currently at an undisclosed location but only temporarily. (note: there is no LOL following that)
     
  5. PA

    PA Well-Known Member

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    Richard, it may be difficult for Mr. Janelli to write the kind of article you desire unless there is a decedent of Huber who John can look up. Unless a taxidermist writes extensively, or there are articles about them in the literature, it is difficult to dredge up much information.

    Taxidermists of great fame get written about over and over again. For example, it you use google to locate information on Carl Akeley, and you use quotes around the name, there are 12,100 posts. But if you add taxidermy or taxidermist there is only 980. If you search a notch below Akeley, with say "James L. Clark" taxidermist, there are only 64 mentions on google despite him writting three books and being quite famous. If you leave out the "L" you get 255 posts, but there are many famous James Clark's on the same we page as the word taxidermy.

    The next level of fame might be "Coleman Jonas" taxidermist with 114 web pages, "Louis Paul Jonas" taxidermist which has 35 sites, and J. W. Elwood, having 200 pages. Leon Pray had 284 pages, but many were sites selling his book

    The weird thing though, is that HUGE numbers of so-called famous taxidermists aren't mentioned on the web at all. I did a reasonable search on most of the inductees into the NTA Hall of Fame, and I could not find any links to Ed Shaw, August Beck, Heinrich Hankelman, Bill Biedermen, William Corson, Raymond Harper, Mathew O. Huusko, Rudolph M. Sciele, E. A. Self, Dow Channell, and Henry Schumacher. I do know a bit about a few of these men, but these are INDUCTEES into the National Taxidermists Hall of Fame, and some of these people are completely unknown to me. Perhaps John can tell stories about all of them, but I sincerely would like to know what reason they were inducted - i.e. did they invent some technique in taxidermy, create some huge museum complex, finance some enterprize, run supply companies. Richard maybe you remember some of these names from when you were a youngster in the late 1700's.

    The only on-line reference to "Fred Huber" taxidermist, was one line on the Taxidermy.net.
     
  6. Wayne R

    Wayne R NRA and B&C Life Member

    John, Excellent article! PA brings up some interesting points. Just a thought, maybe in your (spare) time you could put a book together with a chapter on each of these taxidermists that seem to have been forgotten, but made it to the Hall of Fame?
     
  7. John Janelli

    John Janelli New Member

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    Thank you Mr.Rogers and Wayne. How I wish I could accommodate every note worthy taxidermist in our profession with an article or story line. Compared to the books written about say, Theodore Roosevelt, there really isn't a whole lot of information about any of our icons. The little knowledge I have was very much obtained the same way as Alex Haley acquired his data about his ancestors from Africa when he wrote the nationally acclaimed best seller "Roots". He credited much of his findings to the oral history of what was known as 'griots' or village story tellers. Only because I was immersed in taxidermy since I was old enough to read, was it possible for me to meet people like some of those listed above and a whole lot more. Sinclair was my 'griot'. I only regret that because I was so obsessed with taxidermy, I spent more time at work than I did stock piling information and artifacts about our icons. The inductees of the NTHF were nominated and installed based upon their successes, skills, talents, business acumen, notoriety, and occupational breakthroughs that have made our work more doable if you will for just about any person who has a desire to learn taxidermy. One little known icon that Henry Inchumuk and I both wholeheartedly agree upon as being installed in the Hall Fame is Leon L. Walters who perfected skinless taxidermy for the great apes. In fact Henry loved the fact that I knew of Walters too. I think it's important to know that not all great taxidermists had families who could write let alone wanted to write about their taxidermist husbands or fathers and yet do it well enough to portray that person's imagery as such. Unfortunately, many of these families abhorred the profession that their loved ones had chosen. For every name Mr. Rogers has mentioned, I could add at least 5 more that the world knows little or nothing about, yet made some very outstanding milestones for our industry.
    At some point in time, I would like to see Mr. Rogers himself reconstruct the National Taxidermists Library that he so eloquently wrote about in the Sept./Oct.1993 issue of Outlook magazine. The only way we can continue to educate others about our illustrious icons is to research and promote their literary works and achievements, however limited that may be, on every level obtainable.
     
  8. PA

    PA Well-Known Member

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    John, I am not so sure that Leon Walters is in the NTA Hall of Fame, though I agree that he should be there. I have a few articles by him, and he conceptualized color in casts, as well as casting specimens capturing the hairs within. It was surely innovative for the time frame when it was developed - one of the true thinkers of taxidermy.

    The list I began researching on google, just to see what was available in that source, was from a website still in development. The NTA Hall of Fame, which is a separate entity, and not linked to the NTA has a web site at http://www.taxidermistshalloffame.org/ If you click on inductees, you can see the list I was working with. There are a few obvious blunders on the list but I have not yet bothered to contact the webmaster to point them out - for example Bruchec is spelled wrong, and it should probably be Robert Rockwell, but maybe there is a Raymond Rockwell.

    I had great hopes when I wrote that article in the 1993 Outlook regarding the library, but I became a bit dis-enheartened by the lack of professionalism in the higher levels of the NTA. I don't necessarily think of myself as an academic, but most professional organizations I am familiar with are run professionally. When I presented the idea of the NTA Library at the Richmond NTA meeting, the president of the NTA was Larry Blomquist, a very dignified clear-minded taxidermist who truly wanted to help the profession - and still does. The last few people who have been in high management positions within the NTA don't hold a candle to some of the old presidents. The NTA needs to change for the better, and after standing on the sidelines for a decade or more, I rejoined with the hope change was going to happen after the NTA meeting last summer when there were motions to accept applications to have a new Executive Director. When a committee was formed to re-write the code of ethics, then a movement to get job descriptions, it looked like the NTA was on the way to becoming professional again. The phone call really told me that it wasn't happening though because of collusion of some "southern traditionalists", and when there was a 10 year contract extended illegally, I am not so sure there is any hope for the NTA. I look forward to voting this summer, but unless major changes are in the works, I am not sure I want to be associated with the NTA.

    John, you an I have different views of what the NTA is. I doubt you think it operates professionally all the time - lest you wouldn't have bowed out and then come back to the fold. You have always been a devotee to Taxidermy - probably more to the individual taxidermist. I have more of a passion for the Museum Taxidermist, as, until recently, almost all innovations and improvements in the art of taxidermy were by taxidermists who worked for museums.

    I still think we should put a regular feature on the History of Taxidermy in this forum. Limiting the dispersion of information to those select people who belong to the NTA, isn't right in my book. The information should be available for all people to see around the world rather than a select group. The NTA, however unprofessional as many who are currently directing it, still represents the common taxidermist of the US - whether they belong or not. Those taxidermists should have access to their heritage and history of the art form.

    Your line "The inductees of the NTHF were nominated and installed based upon their successes, skills, talents, business acumen, notoriety, and occupational breakthroughs that have made our work " is what I was referring to. I have a HUGE library of books/magazine/catalogs, and have read much about the history of taxidermy, and I have NO IDEA who some of these people were. I am not sure if there was a committee to chose the inductees, or simply one person nominated another - perhaps someone who made a difference in their personal taxidermy skills. Most organizations of academic sorts, do have inductees who are elected fellows, or honored in some way, but a committee make the decision and a thorough biography is given in the nomination. I just threw out these names to see who on this forum might know of ANY of these people nominated - and why they were nominated. Maybe a history was written about each taxidermist, so if anyone knows this information, I'd like copies if possible.

    There probably should be oral histories taken on some of the current old taxidermists. In the sciences, they send out people with tape recorders and spend a couple hours getting a particular view on individuals. The key is to ask the right questions and then to transcribe the info. I don't know if you have done it before John, but essentially the stories you are writing in Outlook, at least the last one, is almost the same as what can be obtained from interviews.

    I hope the NTA gets the changes it needs. Vote wisely.........
     
  9. Bill Yox

    Bill Yox Well-Known Member

    John, I too enjoy your articles in the Outlook, its the first thing I read when I get it....sometimes the only thing! I am very interested in our history, more so now then ever, yet Im also a bit ashamed that I didnt take note of the names much earlier in my taxidermy career. As I kiddingly say, I used to spend all my time as a budding young taxidermist trying to tear apart and redo mounts the "right" way (at that stage? yeah right!) and nowadays I can finally admire and respect what those old mounts truly are and what they represent, and do my best to salvage and protect. It really is a shame how much of our history has lined dumpsters or been forgotten because it wasnt valued and therefore not written to be passed on. Thanks again JJ.
     
  10. John Janelli

    John Janelli New Member

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    When the master compliments the student, that's really saying something. Thanks Bill. As I write this there is in fact a dumpster sitting on the property of one of your fellow New Yorker's old studio site. Dickie Wooten said it best when he was here last week, "I have just seen the grave yard of our industry, and it is so sad." Anyway, one of these days Bill, your next. I'll be coming up for that interview about you and your world.
     
  11. michael p.

    michael p. Getting better with age :)


    Very good post Bill & a heck of a way to view things. That made alot of sense.