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Drop a wedge????Mounted in Alaska

Discussion in 'Deer and Gameheads' started by DROPPINEM, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. DROPPINEM

    DROPPINEM New Member

    I remember seeing something about them cutting out a pretty good size damaged spot and fixing it by doing something in the shape of a triangle if my memory serves me right.I believe he called it dropping a wedge.I have a deer that has a large exit hole and by the time whoever skinned it out was done with it they put about seven more cuts around it by being sloppy with a knife.Long story short I have an area that after I cut it all out I could put at least two fists through and feel this may be a better approach than a football shaped repair.Thanks for any help
     
  2. bmdakk

    bmdakk Report to moderator

    why not just sew up the smaller cuts?
     

  3. Shawn73

    Shawn73 Active Member

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    Ive done the drop a wedge idea before it all depends the circumstances
     
  4. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Dropping a wedge is intended for lifesized animals were you can make up girth from expanded skin. It won't work on a deer shoulder. Use a football cut but instead of going with the grain of the hair, go ACROSS it. This will allow your neck girth to remain stable and only shorten the brisket slightly.
     
  5. DROPPINEM

    DROPPINEM New Member

    Thanks a lot George.I really appreciate it.
     
  6. DROPPINEM

    DROPPINEM New Member

    Shawn 73,for future reference could you please help me understand exactly what it is.
     
  7. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

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    The bare areas are where antlers penetrated his face and neck. This Deer had scars, next to scars, to nearly scars on top of scars ... and each one was cut out and sewn up, individually.
    [​IMG]

    Each puncture required a dart of skin to be removed, which included all the naked skin surrounding the hole.
    [​IMG]

    I start by knotting off a double thread of fine polyester sewing thread.
    [​IMG]

    After pulling the thread tight, drawing the skin in on itself, I continue to sew using a locking running, or locking whip stitch. The needle is pushed through the two sides of the skin ...
    [​IMG]

    ... and drawn through the loop of thread ...
    [​IMG]


    ... and pulled tight.
    [​IMG]

    This is continued for the full length of the incision. Spacing between the stitches is approximately 1/8" to 3/16" or 4ᵐᵐ to 6ᵐᵐ. The stitching is kept close and tight!
    [​IMG]


    Just two of the many stitch jobs after closing them and tying off the thread.
    [​IMG]

    Using a Ball Peen Hammer - the head of the hammer is perfect for this work - the stitching is flattened ...
    [​IMG]

    Giving a fine repair from the inside, and as seen from the outside!
    [​IMG]

    Yes! Dr. Frankenstein anyone?
    [​IMG]

    Here is the cape after the facial repairs ... and there was a full days worth of them! There are no short cuts!
    [​IMG]
     
  8. joeym

    joeym Old Murphey

    Good post John!
     
  9. DROPPINEM

    DROPPINEM New Member

    Thanks for the post John.Just mounted a deer today that I fixed 6 scars on the same way as you described.I find it helpful to use a wooden ball to stretch the skin over while trimming away the bare skin on the edges before sewing.I understand there are no short cuts,just curious on the drop a edge idea.
     
  10. Megan :)

    Megan :) Well-Known Member

    Wow John, that's great to see! That's how I have been doing mine. :D
     
  11. Brandon, It was interesting to see this post. Just last week we were working on a mule deer pedestal mount and there was a bad spot in the lower part of the neck that was perfect for "dropping the wedge". I wish I would have thought to take some photos. It worked great on this shoulder mount, it just depends on where the damage is. And as John mentioned pounding your stitches flat really helps.
     
  12. DROPPINEM

    DROPPINEM New Member

    Thanks Hudson!!I do get it.I am no good at pics or drawing on the computer either but you pulled off the symbols better than I could.Lol
     
  13. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    What the hell are you guys talking about. It's sure not about "dropping a wedge". And Dale, I don't know how you could have possibly done that on a shoulder pedestal without ending up with a gerenuk pencil necked deer. There's one helluva difference in repairing a football cut (or facsimile) and dropping a wedge.

    ANYTIME you make a repair, you risk diminishing girth, PERIOD. John did a beautiful job, but if at all possible, I never make a football along the the line of the hair. For every football cut out like that, you lose the width of that football in girth. I avoid this by cutting the football ACROSS the the hair pattern. I cut at the bottom of the scar and above it where I get to undamaged hair. The seam will now be completely covered by hair above it unlike the vertical footballs that often require carding. I do lose some LENGTH, but it avoids pencil necking a deer as the girth remains the same and allows the hide to be stretched. The risk of this on the neck is that the brisket will come a bit higher but unless you're dealing with dozens of holes, the hide will still mount properly without distorting.

    Dropping a wedge involves a HUGE damaged area, often several inches wide. When you drop a wedge, imagine the outline of a rowboat. You place a square shape over your damaged area and cut it out. Directly above the damaged area, you set the stern of your "rowboat" against the top of the square and you then cut out a silhouette of the boat with the "bow" facing the head. CAREFULLY cut the rowboat shape without cutting hair. Now, you slide the stern of this boat back to the bottom of the open square you created. Sew the stern and then both gunwhales in place. Now you start pulling hide together as you sew it along both sides of the bow. When they come together, then you sew up the vertical seam. That's dropping a wedge. The length of you boat is always the height of your square cut. All cuts need to be cut from the underside to prevent cutting overhanging hair and they need to be done very carefully so as not to create more work for yourself.

    That's why dropping a wedge can't be used on a shoulder mount. It's designed specifically for areas where the shoulder, back, or butt hair is damaged and where the hide can be stretched significantly without worry of diminishing the girth of the animal. You simply don't have enough hide on a neck to drop a wedge. GEEZ people, this ain't rocket science.
     
  14. *

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Ohub Campfire mobile app
     
  15. HOOKJAW

    HOOKJAW Member

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    GEORGE,
    Excellent way to explain "DAW"...thanks
     
  16. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

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    There was no choice but to remove the skin the way I did. I simply followed the bare skin created by the antler puncture holes in the skin and the resulting hair loss. They were also made along the direction of the hair growth. This skin is so large, little size loss was encountered. ;)
     
  17. George, It actually worked beautifully. The damaged area was large and square shaped with a taper at one end running with the hair. A simple football shape cut wouldn't work. It was a late season mule deer and it still has a nice big neck. The tan we use has great stretch. As I said in my original post it was in the lower part of the neck and ran onto the shoulder so I had plenty of skin to work with. In this particular instance it worked quite well. Probably wouldn't try it mid neck up to the head. I will try to post a photo when I get back from my day job at NASA. :)
     
  18. LordRusty

    LordRusty If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

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    This is an explanation for the oft-mentioned process of "dropping a wedge". Just another in the arsenal of knowledge of skin repair. From the 'Jonas Technique - Vol 3 Game Heads' co-written by Fred Crandall, 1974.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Thank you for the illustrations John. That's what I tried to write but I'm not sure some of these young guys know what a real wedge looks like. LOL

    Thanks Dale for explaining where your repair was.