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What color paint do you use?

Discussion in 'Deer and Gameheads' started by 8Point, Feb 15, 2014.

  1. 8Point

    8Point Member

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    What color paint do you guys use for:
    - The nose.
    - The eyes
    - The ears

    I haven't seen much discussion on this. Of the mounts that I've seen it seems that I might be using the wrong colors... does anyone put a gloss coat over the nose when done?
     
  2. 3bears

    3bears Well-Known Member

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    You haven't done much looking, have you? We have had this exact discussion many times. Also while you're looking check the tutorial section, there is some tutorials there, I believe. Now to answer your question, I use white, pink, red, brown, and very little black. It is more about blending and layering than it is about exact colors. Yes many use gloss on the nose, myself included.
     

  3. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Off white, Natural Flesh, Bright Flesh, Dark Brown, Paynes Gray.
     
  4. 8Point

    8Point Member

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    Thanks just thought I'd ask. Do you use the grey for the nose?
     
  5. JerseyJays

    JerseyJays Well-Known Member

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    Nose and Eyes: flesh ..burnt umber ..paynes grey
     
  6. Duckslayr

    Duckslayr Active Member

    Started using Yox gray this year after suggested on this sight. My new favorite color. Many uses. Shoots very nicely. Still use paynes gray on sheep, ect.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. Gray is a winner for competitions, but not so much for customers. They seam to think a deer nose is jet black, but stay away from just black on anything.
     
  8. 8Point

    8Point Member

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    Got it. That's kinda what I was thinking. When you blend deer eyes. What do you use? I have yet to find a brown that I do not need to blend myself to get the desired color.....
     
  9. On the eyes there is not one size that fits all. You have to blend several colors to achieve the results. You are trying to match the natural skin color while the deer is alive, and that varies from region and deer individually. I use Polytranspar superhide white, flesh, chocolate brown and black umber to get the color for the eyes, all done in very thin layers.
     
  10. Bill Yox

    Bill Yox Well-Known Member

    Thanks Jared. Let me give you guys some advice on the nose grey color. I liked that color because its base was not blue like paynes grey is, but it was meant as a foundation color, and a light coat of scale detail black helps it out. I actually "pattern paint" my nose pads, so that is part of the deal, too. I dont care for paynes in mammal work. Hope that helps some of you!
     
  11. Cole

    Cole Amateur Taxidermist

    Mr. Yox touched on it, but there is no magic color. Yox Nose pad gray is a fine color, and I use it on all of my noses. However, that certainly isn't the only color I use. Flesh, mars red, blending brown and scale detail black are also used, as well as some dry cosmetics from time to time. Eyes, I like white, mars red, cocoa brown, and blending brown. My ears are pre colored before hand so when finishing I can get by with just white and blending brown. These colors can change if there is a certain look I am trying to replicate. It isn't the colors, it's how they are used. Blending, layering, and creating depth is far more important than the name on the label.
     
  12. 8Point

    8Point Member

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    Awesome advice! Thank you!!!
     
  13. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I don't blend colors in the cup. I use Hdo-mist water base paints. All paint are done in thin almost transparent washes. For eyes, I spray 50% off white with 50% alcohol. Follow that up with natural flesh 50/50 with alcohol. Follow this with 50/50 bright flesh. Now 75% alcohol to 25% dark brown. 75% alcohol to 25% Paynes gray around the inside of the "eye ring" where it touches the glass eye and the nictitating membrane. The result is a medium to dark brown at ten feet away or more. Five feet away they look medium brown. Up close you can't tell if they are brown or flesh or what, because of the depth, all the colors slightly come through. Depending on the light, it will take on different hues. I noticed this hue changing with the light, by studying successive pictures of deer as they walked into and out of different light and shadow. I should mention that this is for black tailed deer as that is what I do the most.
     
  14. 8Point

    8Point Member

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    Wow sounds like a process but quality work requires that. One thing that I really struggle with is a stupid problem.... my air brush seems to be inter mittentent and difficult to control..... I'm still getting used to using it I guess.... right air pressure, right tip, right spray etc..... nothing is easy about the process I guess. Thanks for help everyone!!!!
     
  15. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    If you use water based paint, you can thin it down with rubbing alcohol and it gives you more control with out clogging. It will dry faster also.
     
  16. JerseyJays

    JerseyJays Well-Known Member

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    Something also to consider;
    I use paynes grey from wildlife colors.... Which is almost black with a hue of blue.. Mostly dark tho.

    I've seen it by other brands and it is as blue as blue can get... Nowhere near the same color lol.
     
  17. 8Point

    8Point Member

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    Awesome advice guys! Thank you!
     
  18. coryhammett

    coryhammett New Member

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    I too am a big fan of Yox nose pad grey. If it looks to light just darken it up a little. I apply all my paint in a thinned down for. Seems to go on smoother and look lots better. As far as the eyes seems like every deer is a little different so they all get layered a little different. Lots of trial and error. If you don't like the way it looks in the end remove it and start over
     
  19. Depends on the deer, of course. Most of what I've sen on a deer are black, very few gray.
     
  20. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    126, actually none of the live deer you have seen had black noses. They may have APPEARED to be black, but, if you do an in-depth study and looked at noses at extreme close ups magnified, you won't find any black. You will find browns, flesh, and grays. Now, if you are talking about mounted deer, then ya, black is a common taxidermist mistake.