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Mold of the week in pictures

Discussion in 'Molding and Casting' started by Glen Conley, Jun 17, 2007.

  1. GBRUCH

    GBRUCH "I am nothing without christ".....John 15:5

    Don--when you mold a fish you copy a fish when you mold a skin mounted fish the body was sculpted by someone--no? If it wasn't sculpted by the mold maker I would think permission would need to be given to duplicate that "form". Is it ethical to copy someones sculpture even in part. In my eyes it isn't ethical --you should carve your own body for this process. Is it illegal--I don't know and don't care since it isn't a body I produce. Your also an "expert" and thought the interested parties should know that there may be a cause for concern about marketing such a product. Illegal it may not be but it isn't very ethical in my opinion. Carve your own mannikins and don't copy someone elses sculpture. Not sure what" leave it to me means' but I will add this--good post besides the above mentioned.

    Jeremy in your descriptive some of the terms and products are a bit misplaced--Both Don and I (Hope I can speak Here for Don) use a bit different products. We both get good results using our specific materials and they can be interchanged. I would suggest, since this is your first attempt that you utilize just one of our methods so as not to be too confused. I have a pretty self explanatory article in breakthrough and you can always call with questions. Don has a website with contact info and I am sure He will be by bye here sooner or later. Good Luck with your sons fish!
     
  2. jeremy

    jeremy Have you hugged your snake today!

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    Thanks Gary, Im stuck at work untill tommorow morning so I will go home and read your articles in my breakthroughs. Up untill now if didnt have much to do with birds I just skimmed over stuff in them but thats the benifit to having them so I can go back a learn somthing new by rereading them. I let you know if I ahve questions. Thanks again
     

  3. Glen Conley

    Glen Conley KARMA GOOSE R.I.P. 2006-2006

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    Here's a couple of photos of one of the forms to come out of the mold that heated up on me when I did the lay-up on the mold. Terry Lipscomb and crew poured the foam, and they do have it down pat.

    Part of my deal is that I get to choose someone to send a form to as I make each mold (I get to pick state associations for CARE packages also). No one had spoken for this one, so I figured to put up one of these first out of the mold forms for a TERF auction fund raiser. I keep getting my plans changed for me, otherwise I would already have had it auctioned off. Watch for the auction towards the end of this week.

    Food for thought, if some of you other guys that make molds for production pieces could see your way clear to do so, you might want to consider putting up one of your pieces for TERF also. I bet that these high end pieces that some of the fish gurus put out could generate a nice little donation for TERF.

    Addition:
    The first form out of the mold was auctioned off on behalf of TERF.
    Steve Favour was the winning bidder.
    http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php/topic,45339.0.html

    Just an idea.........

    P.S. The form is a 6 3/4" x 16". straight semi-sneak
     
  4. These really are not Molds but casts. I will take a few photos of the production molds.
    The originals were molded in bondo and then remolded in silicone mold max 30 after chasing the casts

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  5. mk

    mk -30 below

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    jknuth- why not just mold it out of mmx30 from the beginning??
     
  6. If you have a perfect specimen or get lucky and have a flawless cast then that would work.
    There is always a few casting flaws, and possible scales missing.
    by chasing the cast I can go in and fix all of this before so I never have to fix it again. It makes for a Higher quality production cast.
     
  7. jeremy

    jeremy Have you hugged your snake today!

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    Awesome casts, one day soon ill give this a try Im having too much casting duck heads.
     
  8. coues_deer

    coues_deer New Member

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    Glen - Great thread, I have a question. Do you put any type of sealer on the sculpture before you begin building the mold?
     
  9. Glen Conley

    Glen Conley KARMA GOOSE R.I.P. 2006-2006

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    Coues_deer, definitely a sealer. A sealer can allow you to use materials that could otherwise be incompatible with the resins. The most common problem maker would be sculpting/modeling clays that contain sulphur.

    I've been kicking the sealer thing up a notch or two. I already pointed out that I primarily use hard mediums, and also mix my mediums to get end results. All is fair in love and war......and art.

    Here is a head I just finished that is done over a foam armature with body filler, Magic Sculpt, and Nitro-Stan. As my side to side symmetry was getting closer, I would spray the piece with sandable primer. That helped to get rid of the camo effect of the mixed mediums, and allowed blemishes to show up better. Sand off the primer, do the touch up. Primer again. Sand the primer back off the high spots, primer again, repeating as needed.

    I used a black, black primer. That shows flaws up really well. However, it also photographs as black, black. I had to photo chop the picture to an over exposed value, and convert it to black and white in order to see what it looks like.

    You will still see what looks like some low, dimply looking spots here and there. You would be best to consider those as optical illusions. The reason I say that is because I started doing a clear lacquer build up over the sculpture.

    The best sealer I have found yet has been Deft SATIN spray cans. I start out building up several light coats, until I get a uniform appearance to the finish. Then I start spraying the low areas, and any of the areas that form a V, or a hard line in the sculpture. I spray to the point the Deft is just beginning to run. Then I start twirling and tilting my sculpt and stand to guide the runs where I want them. The Deft will tack up quick, so the sculpt doesn't really have to be kept in motion for that long. I just keep repeating that step until I get the desired end results. If I loose control to where I actually get a run, no big whoop. I let the Deft dry, sand off the ridge, spray again.

    I want my sculpture suspended so that I can work all around it. To me, working from BEHIND the sculpture is just as important as working from in front of it. After all, we are looking at a three dimensional finished product that should be able to be viewed from any angle and still look correct.

    My initial prototype sculptures for this line were in excess of thirty pounds. That made things a little awkward when screwing the sculpt off and on a threaded pipe nipple. I had to get waaaay too fancy with my mounting stands to get the results I wanted from the stand.
    The photos are the upgrade version to the stand plans that I have at this address: www.hidetanning.net/TaxidermyMountingStand.html
     
  10. coues_deer

    coues_deer New Member

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    Glen - thank you for the detailed answer. I have been using shellac followed by a few coats of Krylon clear matte spray. Thanks again for the time you spend responding. There are a few "individuals " that constantly berate those on this site and I really appreciate your help!
     
  11. Glen Conley

    Glen Conley KARMA GOOSE R.I.P. 2006-2006

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    coues_deer, something I forgot. I do all of this stuff by hand, including brushing on the PVA.

    The harder carnauba wax formulations especially for mold releases tend to cause the PVA to bead up. Good ol' Johnson's Paste Wax applied three times, and buffed in between coats, works like a charm.
     
  12. brelo

    brelo Winchester

    Thanks to all that have contributed to this post! I have learned a lot and really enjoyed reading this. I am looking forward to more like this.
    Dave
     
  13. Glen Conley

    Glen Conley KARMA GOOSE R.I.P. 2006-2006

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    It doesn't take much of a foundation for an out house. With that being said, here's how I handle setting up a jig fixture for making a pressure mold.

    Sculpting with hard mediums makes it kinda hard to set a T pin to support a clay flange dam. Not only that, trying to separate a clay to clay bond when the mold is flipped over to do the other side can turn into a real mess and a nasty looking seam line.

    A poor fit of the mold halves that would allow foam to escape between the seam flanges can cause distortion of the finished piece. A poor fit at the back board on one side or the other that would allow enough foam to escape to build up pressures can distort the finished piece.

    For the back board, I mill out white pine 1 x stock to make the supporting ribs for 1/2" plywood. I use six of these at a right angle to the directional grain of the ply. These are all glued and screwed together. "IF" a straight edge can then be passed over the piece from any direction, or angle and shows no light underneath it, a piece of 1/4" lauan is then glued over that. Almost half will get rejected. That piece is then sealed front and back, with the tubules built up with lacquer until the working surface is smooth and even. This takes several coats with sanding in between. Once that is done, a 1 x frame is built around that to further stabilize. The object of the game is to be able to use the back boards over and over again.

    Wood or plywood is incorporated into the back of the sculpt right up front. I sculpt on mounting stands, so the same wood is used to secure the sculpture to the molding back board.

    With the sculpture attached to the back board, a simple frame with front legs is built around those components.

    I use the 1/4" lauan again to make "leaves" that will be screwed down fairly close to the sculpture. This gives me a strong support to tool my clay into place to make the flange dam.

    The clay is also shot with lacquer, and then waxed. That makes it easier and faster to clean the first flange surface.

    This is a 6 3/4" x 18" wt pictured here.
     
  14. jermh1

    jermh1 Member

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    hope the pics work
    here is a mold of a leopard tortoise shell, 14in just a simple brush on mold with a 2 piece fiber glass jacket. made with mold max 30 loaded up with Thi-Vex a thixotrophic additive. it is hand roto cast with smooth cast-300, not the smoothest procedure but for shell this size its worth the 15min of fiberglass splinters and spilled plastic. before the plastic fully sets it is backed with foam 2-3lb. It was a fun project.


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    Jeremy
     
  15. Very Cool!!
     
  16. Here is a Fun project. a mold of a Wolf Fish head.

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    And the casting, sorry dark photo.

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  17. A- Fish

    A- Fish Stehling's Taxidermy

    Excellent Josh !! Thanks for sharing your pics !!
     
  18. jermh1

    jermh1 Member

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    horns are molded with mold max 30, made an extra set of molds and use only half of each jacket to store them, during use the rubber is thick enough to keep its shape,
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    made up a cardboard jig to hold all twelve of them in the pressure pot, I cast them @ 90psi with smooth cast 327 and use the butt end of a small paint brush to dislodge bubbles in the tips

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    one run Oribi, bush Duiker, Steinbok
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    skull cap molds or 1/2 skull, and a shot of the Duiker with the dam removed, for these small ones I use 1in pink foam and water based clay to embed 1/2 the skull and make the dam. it is easy to use a straight edge on the foam to get a good clean line on the skull

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    I drill out the ends of the horns, clean up with dremel, then insert into the mold with some wax or vasaline to seal it up, then pour the skull cap into the horns, the molds were made with the horn caps on

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    two of my first ones out of the mold, could have used a more bone colored plastic but didn't have one open.

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    the objective here was to practice some techniques for big horns without the big cost.
     
  19. Very very Nice!
    Did you make your own Pressure Pot?
     
  20. jermh1

    jermh1 Member

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    I didn't make the pressure pot, I sniped it on ebay for $50 its about 7gal. I will make a bigger one once I get a bit more settled probably 30 gal or so which looks like a good size, I however wouldn't recommend anyone but a professional welder even think about it (I managed to pick up 10 AWS welding certifications in my free time), That much pressure can be deadly. I also reccomend if you pick an old one up over 2 gal that you get it hydro tested, to make sure it still has full structural integrity
    Jeremy