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Paint schedule for a Lake Erie walleye.

Discussion in 'Fish Taxidermy' started by fordpickupjaybird, Apr 21, 2014.

  1. fordpickupjaybird

    fordpickupjaybird New Member

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    I'm new to the fish taxidermy and was wondering if anyone had a paint schedule that they would share with me for Lake Erie walleye. They have a lot of silver in them more than gold. I'm gonna do some experimenting around but definitely could use some help with being new at it.

    Thanks
    Jason
     
  2. rnviper3

    rnviper3 New Member

    experimenting is a great way to learn what colors do what when mixed. Thought I told you that.
     

  3. fordpickupjaybird

    fordpickupjaybird New Member

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    U did, just trying to cut the learning curve down even farther by seeing what others do and how they do it differently. I never stop learning.
     
  4. 1fish2fish

    1fish2fish Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like you already know what to do. Easy with the yellow, white and pearl-white are your friend.
    Best, Scott
     
  5. fordpickupjaybird

    fordpickupjaybird New Member

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    K thanks , how do you go about getting the pinkish, fleshy and chrome look under and on the side of the jaws.
    Thanks
     
  6. Cecil

    Cecil Well-Known Member

    Be careful with that pinkish flesh look. If you do it incorrectly it looks like sheet. ;D For commercial mounts I forego that pink but do use some burnt seinna on the anus very lightly.
     
  7. Cecil

    Cecil Well-Known Member

    I do a lot of Lake Erie walleye and find that if they are small and taken from early spring turbid water they do look silvery. However the big sows albeit lighter than you would come across in Canadian shield lake waters do have some yellow gold on the flanks.

    Here's how I paint a Lake Erie walleye:

    Offwhite - use this inside the mouth, under the gill covers, gills, underside of the heads, the belly, and branchiostegal rays etc. Use just enough to get good coverage but don't overdo it.

    Chrome Pearlescent - Very sparingly use some on the white areas you painted except any fleshy areas of the head, with it a little heavier on the branchiostegal rays and the bottom of the head that is boney.

    Dark Brown - Use this color to blend in the epoxy area on the top of the head, the bottom lip and to even out any light areas on the skin or repairs on the dorsal fins or caudal fin. If the mottling on the cheeks is inconsistent after the fish dried you can even that out too. Add retarder to your paint about 30 percent to be able to do any detail you might need with this color on fin repairs etc. I use a number 1 tip with a simple single action Paasche and get do just about any detail I want.

    Bright Yellow mixed with Irrridescent Gold and retarder. Mix a ratio of about 3 to 1 Irridescent Gold to Bright Yellow and add some retarder to thin it down and keep it from drying in your airbrush tip. Paint the light areas individually in between the scales on the flanks up to the dorsal area, but purposely do not paint all of them. Don't make them too heavy but allow them to pop a little due to the yellow,but if your mix is right the gold should be evident also. Due the same on the cheeks of the fish in between the darker mottling.

    Note: If you are painting a walleye where the sides are washed out and there is no evident light area on the scales to apply the yellow gold you can first paint the flanks dark brown and go over that with find steel wool.

    Bright Yellow - Use this to even out the brown on the top of the head and the dorsal area and come up with somewhat of a green color. Many Lake Erie walleyes are fairly light in this area and more of a green vs. brown that you find in other waters. You can add dark brown later if you feel it is too green.

    Also lightly enhance the rays on the pelvic fins and anal fin with the yellow and add some to the caudal fin. I also lightly paint the pectoral fin.

    Seal the pelvic, anal, and caudal fins along with the cheeks of the fish with a sealer. I use an aerosol clear lacquer sealer from Ace hardware. This is to keep the white you will add in the next step from bleeding with the yellow you applied to the fins.

    Off White: Very lightly use this color on the bottom edge of the caudal fin (tail), outside edge of the anal fin, and the bottom edges of the pelvic fins. This is one of the trademarks of a walleye and separates it from it's close relative the sauger.

    Dark Brown: Even out the back etc. if need be or if you want the fish darker on the back or more brown. You can add some barring on the side but make it very very subtle as Lake Erie Walleyes don't have pronounced bars like they do in other waters. I've even seen it entirely missing.

    Black: Use this on the top fin that has a subtle black on it.

    Gill Red: Pack the mouth with an old sock or paper towels and paint the gills. If you get over spray on white areas remove it with fine steel wool and paint over it with the offwhite. In the back of the mouth, if you get gill red in the throat area you can just white it out for commercial fish.

    Paint a light sheen of Chrome pearlescent on the cheeks of the fish. Don't over do it. The sealing you did previously will prevent the yellow/gold on the cheek from bleeding with the chrome pearlescent.
     
    Jon Adolph likes this.
  8. fordpickupjaybird

    fordpickupjaybird New Member

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    Wow thanks Cecil for taking the time to type all of that. I really appreciate it. It's good to see how different people paint their fish so you can see how many different ways there actually are to achieve a beautiful finished product.
     
  9. rnviper3

    rnviper3 New Member

    Jason, The way you paint, you will have it in no time. You have an eye for the details that it takes to do great fish work.
     
  10. fordpickupjaybird

    fordpickupjaybird New Member

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    Thanks I appreciate that!