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Birds of Prey & Song Birds

Discussion in 'Bird Taxidermy' started by Jake L, Jun 14, 2014.

  1. Jake L

    Jake L New Member

    How does someone in the states get to the permits to mount birds of prey & song birds? Is it even worth the trouble to get them? If I were to get the permits how do I go about acquire the specimens? I've always wanted to mount them but I've always heard they're "off limits", yet I think I've seen people on here from the states who've posted pics of them. If I'm wrong on that statement, I stand corrected. Just looking for information about the topic
     
  2. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Forget it. The ones you see on here are being mounted for agencies authorized to have them. They are mounted only by special permits issued by the proper authority for THEIR use. It is illegal for private citizens to mount native raptors and songbirds as well as those listed on CITES.
     

  3. Old Fart

    Old Fart Active Member

    George you are WRONG! I don't think anyone has been charged with "illegal mounting"........."possession" is the illegal part. In fact, you DON"T even have to mount them to get into big trouble. LOL


    Pat you are correct, I corrected my post. That's what I get for not proof reading a post and trying to get out the door at the same time.
     
  4. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    LOL OK OF, a faux pas on my part there. They don't even come into my shop without the paperwork preceeding them.

    Why is it that some people are so enamored with doing things that are illegal? I recall the first bald eagle I did. It alit on a transformer and fried. Sadly, it had eaten it's fill of dead or rotten menhaden and as it lay on my freezer, the crop full or those greasy rotten fish ran out on to the floor. Damned sure took the romance right out of the experience.
     
  5. byrdman

    byrdman Well-Known Member

    8,890
    4,120
    OF......do you mean you "don't" even have to mount them .......
     
  6. Nancy C

    Nancy C Well-Known Member

    You don't need a special permit to mount North American non-game birds. All you need is your regular Migratory Bird Permit (federal) and any other taxidermy permits that might be required by your state.
    It's the owner of the non-game birds who needs to have all of their papers in order, and that owner cannot be an ordinary private individual, or you.
    In most cases it will be a park, educational facility, museum, or game dept. Occasionally you might get work from a Native American, but be very careful with that. Many of them don't fully understand the paperwork either, and YOU will be the one who gets the legal hammer of doom if the papers aren't perfect - not them.

    Bottom line: you cannot possess any part of a wild bird that's native to the US unless there is a hunting season for it someplace; in which case you should log it in properly.
    If you really want to have your very own raptor or songbird, shorebird, etc, then you will have to find and purchase a fairly common non-native species. (ie: not Cites I)
    Unless you are lucky and know some exotic bird breeders, you should be prepared. They don't come cheap.
     
  7. Jake L

    Jake L New Member

    Thanks for all the responses. George I'm not wanting to do anything illegal, just the opposite. I find these birds very interesting and was interested in what had to be done in order to do them the legal way. You have a lot of information that I'm glad you post, though at times a bit harshly lol ;D. Again thanks for the input from all who answered.
     
  8. Old Fart

    Old Fart Active Member

    Raptors are neat and "tough" birds and I enjoyed mounting them back in the days when they were "common fare"(pre March 1972).Tough skinned and easy to work with, they were tough to find any "really good" reference for in those days. That was back in the "learning the hard way" days and I know I made a mess of a lot of those that I did.
     
  9. Judysan

    Judysan The Roadkill Queen

    I agree with OF on raptors. Fun. If you want to start doing song birds, practice on some Starlings. It's like working with wet tissue paper ... with tweezers. Get the mounting down before you try to get work with museums or schools.
     
  10. bowerbird

    bowerbird New Member

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    0
    Its always greener on the other side of the fence,,,
    In my honest opinion, go visit the aviculture world and line up some fanciers, they have tons of aviary deaths that if you want to play with thin skinned tiny birds, you will fill a freezer with all sorts in no time.
    That's not to mention the colourful parrots, ,and the reality is you can actually make money by selling these mounts to the public, rather than having your hands tied in a non trade situation.
     
  11. Mac67

    Mac67 New Member

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    You might also try contacting your local game warden. They pick up dead raptors and other migratory birds quite often and may know of a school or a museum who would love to have the bird mounted for educational purposes. School budgets aren't great these days, but if you offer them a discount - perhaps in return for having a small sign on the mount stating it was mounted by you - they might be willing to have you mount it for them.
     
  12. jwprentice1

    jwprentice1 New Member

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    Whomever you mount the bird for, must have a U.S. Fish & Wildlife Educational Permit. Most states also require a permit for Educaational Purposes. The problem becomes one of time-time to get the permits before mounting the specimen. Best to check with Migratory Bird Permit Office in the Region in which you reside along with check at State Game & Fish about state permits.
     
  13. Mac67

    Mac67 New Member

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    The Educational Permit is generally for live birds. Otherwise, I've seen them issued to - for example - falconers who teach kids about falconry and have in their possession several study skins of different raptors. That's in addition to their falconry permits.

    As Nancy stated above, all a taxidermist needs (federally, anyway) is their regular, old Migratory Bird Permit, enabling them to perform taxidermy on MB's.

    The person for whom the bird is being mounted no longer gets any special permit, either. There is a blanket exception under the MBTA for schools, museums, and anyone else having a migratory bird mounted for educational purposes (a DNR office, a wildlife sanctuary, etc.). It's found here:

     
  14. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    I have yet to see anyplace in the regulations "requiring a federal migratory bird permit". We all presume that to be true but I can't find it in any of the CFR's.
     
  15. foxyhawky

    foxyhawky Dont Blame Me, Blame the Vicodin

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    Hell
    I got a owl off the side of the road and mounted it. It was in great shape considering. Haven't gotten in trouble yet.
     
  16. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I'm glad you included the word, YET.
     
  17. foxyhawky

    foxyhawky Dont Blame Me, Blame the Vicodin

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    Hell
    Lol I couldnt save the body, just the wings, so I got a awesome wing mount, and a talon survived the hit so I also got a lucky owl talon.
     
  18. jwprentice1

    jwprentice1 New Member

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    after the State and Feds get through with you =you will probably wish you were in hell. Against the law to pick up road-kill and possess any part-obviously you don't care.
     
  19. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Hawky, after reading the "quotes" you have below your avatar, your replies do not surprise me.