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Tacking deer hide to form

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by jhunter13, Jun 19, 2014.

  1. jhunter13

    jhunter13 Member

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    With each deer I finish I am questioning more of my techniques and trying to improve. I have found that I am already doing things "my own way" which is very different from the way I was taught.

    With that said, I was working on a deer this week and got to the step where I was taught to use a brad nailer and tack the hide down to the form. This doesnt leave much room to taxi the hide if you later realize its off. Is this necessary with todays hide paste?

    Thanks

    Jon
     
  2. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Jon please ignore that lesson. Only a quack would EVER recommend that. Prefit your hide to insure it matches. If not, alter the form or replace it. Take the hide off. Sand/scratch/sandblast the form to rough up the surface. Cover 100% if the form with glue. Install your hide. Press all the air rearward. Press the hide down into the form. If it tries to drum, cut small cardboard strips and use T-pins to tack the skin down TEMPORARILY . Leave the cards in place no more than two days without removing the card, adjusting the skin, and grooming before recarding IF NECESSARY. If you don't the hide will be deformed permanently.
     

  3. jhunter13

    jhunter13 Member

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    Thanks George. I was already doing the rest, now I will just skip the brads.
     
  4. ElkinsTaxidermy

    ElkinsTaxidermy www.ronelkinstaxidermy.com

    I was shocked when I saw Meder doing that in a video. He only did some of the 'low spots', but it still looked like a horrible way to teach someone.
     
  5. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Absolutely Ron. That's a great way to get "dimples" in your hide. Bet he would look down on that during show judging.
     
  6. duxdown

    duxdown New Member

    Well I can agree with George mostly. But application of glue 100 percent isn't something I do right away. I coat the face slightly then the neck good and slip the hide on. I finish my eye work then coat the face and slip it on and do the lips and eyes and ears and sewing. Then peal the hide back and finish with glue and make all my adjustment and lightly pin the arm pits and brisket in place after working all the air and making sure everything is were is should be. Then I staple and cut off excess.
     
  7. jhunter13

    jhunter13 Member

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    I have that video. I bought it after i finished classes. That was the main reason I continued the process.

    Thank you George and Ron.
     
  8. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    I had a Breakthrough manual that showed where to brad nail the hide down. A few hundred brad nails and a dried deer head full of dimples later and , well, it was the first and last time I used that method. Now I MIGHT use four to six pins, however, zero pins is the norm.
     
  9. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Will, I do the same thing. But every square inch WILL have hide paste in the end. I was too lazy to type it out on the DROID.
     
  10. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Hide paste on the "hills" is just as important as hide paste in the "valleys". 100% coverage on the entire mount insures that movement is nearly impossible as paste on the high spots keep the paste in the low spots doing it's job as well. Hide paste that is too thick takes longer to dry, so I keep it just a thin layer. A sopping wet hide keeps the paste wet longer. I prefer a hide that is moist with hair as dry as I can get it.
     
  11. Dave Byrd

    Dave Byrd Active Member

    I would never use a brad nailer on a mount but I do use a tack hammer and 20 gauge galvanized brads in certain areas. If there is any dimpling, it is so minute that you would be hard pressed to find it.
     
  12. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    But why?
     
  13. Dave Byrd

    Dave Byrd Active Member

    Just a little more holding power till the glue sets.
     
  14. George

    George The older I get, the better I was.

    Do you pull them out? I've mounted a few Texas deer over the years and the skin is so thin and the hair so short that anything is accentuated . I can't imagine dimples not showing.
     
  15. Dave Byrd

    Dave Byrd Active Member

    I do remove some but leave the ones in areas where the hair easily covers them. You're certainly right about the thin skin and short hair around here and I'll readily admit that when the light and angle is just right, I can sometimes see some very faint dimples in some areas.

    I know these are not the best pictures but this is one that I used brads in the brisket, arm pits, shoulder muscles, wrinkles and down the sides of the neck.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  16. jhunter13

    jhunter13 Member

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    I was taught in class to nail from the neck to brisket on both sides. Every deer since the has seen less and less and now they will see none.
     
  17. duxdown

    duxdown New Member

    I put my hands on the deer for the first few days and work the creases and no nails needed. I will pin the arm pit till the glue grabs then out they come. I find the 6900 form has the hardest brisket and pits to hold naturally without a few pins for a day or so.
     
  18. If you have a thin proper fitting skin and a good paste you should have no need for pins or nails and still get all the detail you desire
     
  19. Tanglewood Taxidermy

    Tanglewood Taxidermy Well-Known Member

    Amen.
     
  20. brushycreek

    brushycreek New Member

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    I agree. All I do is staple a cut out coke box across the stitches to lay the hair down. Other than pinning the tear duct and corner of eye that's all I use . And never have a problem. I do use home made pins to hold the skin in place until I get done sowing